Skip to main content

Past Events

L

Genghis Khan's Descendants and Post-Communist Mongolia

Nov 9, 2017, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Eggers 341

Morris Rossabi (Columbia University and Queens College)

After more than two centuries of Chinese rule and seventy years of Soviet Communist influence, Mongolia finally had an opportunity to chart its own policies and future in 1990.  Rossabi's talk describes both its successes and failures, which has now led to economic crisis and political stalemate.

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making, Being, and Belonging Through Multimodal Composing

Nov 9, 2017, 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

319 Sims

Jody Shipka (University of Maryland)

What does making have to do with belonging and composition?  In this half-day hands-on workshop, Jody Shipka invites participants to consider the impact of doing something beyond, or in addition to, “thinking with objects”—or, as is often the case when objects are even considered and given their due, simply writing about objects. Designed in part to resist a tendency in the field to conflate multimodality with digital media, the workshop encourages participants to explore how composing with objects provides opportunities to create different kinds of arguments and tell different kinds of stories about themselves and the world around them. In so doing, the workshop explores the complex relationship between making, being, longing, and belonging through the lens and practice of multimodal composition. 

Participants, please note: coffee and light breakfast served at 8:30 a.m.; activities begin promptly at 9:00.

UPDATE: This workshop has already filled to capacity. For more info, please contact pwberry@syr.edu.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making and Remaking a Literate Life: Being, Longing, Belonging

Nov 8, 2017, 2:15 PM-3:45 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Paul Prior (University of Illinois)
Jody Shipka (University of Maryland)
This joint presentation by Prior and Shipka challenges static notions of being and belonging in accounts of literacies and disciplines. Instead, it offers a dynamic view of the embodied, affective, and historically situated processes of making and remaking literate lives.

Paul Prior on Becoming and Belonging With: Laminating Literate Activity and Disciplinarity
"
Typical approaches to disciplines frame participation as a question of belonging to a disciplinary community, of tracing a developmental path that makes one a bona fide member. Seeing disciplinarity as ongoing dynamic flows, as a moving and morphing laminated assemblage rather than a bordered territory, I consider here an alternative framing, belonging with, a matter of aligning to flows rather than fitting into territories or being accepted as a member of the club. Drawing in part on a case study of a biologist (Nora) and her lifespan engagements with scientific practices, and contextualizing that case study in the centuries-long dispersion of biology into lifeworld artifacts, environments, and practices, I will sketch out the empirical and theoretical grounds for seeing disciplinarity and literate activity as laminated becoming and consider the ethical and political implications of this notion of belonging with instead of belonging to."

Jody Shipka on Be/longing: On the Distributed, Embodied, and Affective Dimensions of Composing Processes
"
Historically speaking, composition—as a discipline and a course—has focused on human agents/agencies (writers) and the production of print-based (alphabetic) scholarly texts. I argue for an expanded, increasingly dynamic focus for composition: one that advocates for the inclusion of more beings (both human and nonhuman) and that recognizes various forms of longing and, in so doing, facilitates a greater capacity for belonging. More specifically, I argue for the importance of treating writing in relation  to the other rich and varied resources composers employ in their works and lives as a way of highlighting events, artifacts, affects, and bodies that have been underrepresented by scholars in the field, and also for the importance of frameworks that allow us to conceptualize research and composing processes as highly distributed and complexly layered arrangements of humans and nonhumans."


Additional supporters:
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
School of Education
Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
Composition and Cultural Rhetoric Graduate Circle

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Enough with All These Border Walls: Redrawing Disciplinary Becoming and Belonging

Nov 8, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Paul Prior (University of Illinois)

This workshop invites participants to consider the heterogeneous trajectories that become entwined in their own disciplinarity and then to use their autobiographical reflections to rethink relevant problem spaces in theory, research, and/or practice. In the first part of the workshop, Paul Prior has participants reflect about their own becoming and their engagements in disciplinarity. These activities are designed to encourage a critical re-narration of that becoming and a deeper awareness of the system of terms, tropes, and interests that constructs typical models of disciplines as walled, territorial, Herderian communities entered through the narrow passages of school curricula.  The second part of the workshop explores implications for their theory, research, and practice of seeing disciplinary becoming and belonging as laminated assemblage rather than category membership.

UPDATE: This workshop has already filled to capacity. For more info, please contact pwberry@syr.edu.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Where Have All the Alphabets Gone? Disappearing Traditional Writing Systems and the Worldwide Loss of Cultural Identity

Nov 3, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Tim Brookes (Champlain College)

Tim Brookes, founder of the Endangered Alphabets Project, uses art to draw attention to imperiled languages and cultures, creating wood carvings that display the beautiful scripts of languages on the verge of extinction.  Brookes will address questions of how a culture’s writing system reflects a sense of value, legitimacy and belonging, why cultures around the world are losing their traditional scripts, and what else is being lost in the process.

An exhibit of works by Tim Brookes will be on display on the first floor of Bird Library from October 25, 2017 through November 3, 2017.

Additional Supporters:
The University Libraries
The College of Arts & Sciences
The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
Languages, Literature & Linguistics
Religion
The Indigenous Values Initiative
The School of Education
Reading and Language Arts
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition

top
L

Creative Conversations: Water + Photography

Nov 2, 2017, 6:30 PM-7:45 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

Jeffrey Karson (Syracuse University - Earth Sciences)
Ed Morris (Syracuse University - Transmedia)
Susannah Sayler (Syracuse University - Transmedia)
Romita Ray (Syracuse University - Art & Music Histories), moderator

How do humanists, artists, and scientists approach similar subjects through different disciplinary lenses? Acclaimed scientist Jeffrey Karson joins award-winning artists Susannah Sayler and Edward Morris in a conversation moderated by art historian Romita Ray about water and photography. Co-author of Discovering the Deep: A Photographic Atlas of the Seafloor and Ocean Crust, Karson has photographed the ocean floor, while Sayler and Morris co-direct The Canary Lab, which develops research-based art and media focused on ecology. Q&A and reception to follow.


Co-Sponsors:

  • The College of Arts & Sciences
  • Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • Art Education
  • Art & Music Histories
  • Light Work
  • Multimedia Photography & Design
  • The Canary Lab
  • Communication & Rhetorical Studies
  • Geography
  • Earth Sciences
  • Science Communications
  • Science Teaching
  • Syracuse University Humanities Center
top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs on Post-WWII Japanese Culture

Oct 28, 2017, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM

Slocum Hall Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Keiko Ogura (Japan)
Dr. Daisaku Yamamoto (Colgate University)
Rahna Reiko Rizzuto (author)
Dr. Chad Diehl (Loyola University)
Dr. Sue Napier (Tufts University)

On That Day in 1945, the first atomic bomb attacked Hiroshima, and three days later Nagasaki, and changed the world ever after. This interdisciplinary symposium will hear from Hiroshima survivor Keiko Ogura and scholars whose research reveal the bombs’ lasting effects on our daily lives. The panel includes guests from Syracuse University and beyond, hosted by the Languages, Literatures and Linguistics department and the Moynihan Institute.

Related activities:

August 23 - November 26
Exibition: That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

October 19 - November 3
Installation: "That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Slocum Hall Marble Room

October 22
Video Projection: "After Hiroshima Mon Amor" and "Let Me Count the Ways"
Slocum Hall Auditorium

October 24
AM: Ms. Ogura meets with local high school students
Everson Museum of Art

5:30 p.m.: "Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art & Architecture of That Day Now"
Panel discussion and reception
Slocum Hall Atrium

October 23 - 25 - 26 - 27
Ms. Ogura meets with various community groups, students, media

October 28
LLL / Moynihan Symposium: That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs in Post-WWII Japanese Culture
Slocum Hall Auditorium

October 30
Individual / small group meetings with Ms. Ogura, available by appointment; email for information.

November 16
Closing reception for That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

Visit the School of Architecture website for additional details.

"That Day Now" series made possible by:

  • The Japan Foundation
  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
  • Hiroshima Fukuyama Technical High School
  • Hiroshima Motomachi High School
  • Everson Museum of Art
  • Clear Path for Veterans
  • Syracuse City School District
  • Syracuse University units/programs, including: the School of Architecture; The Canary Lab at the College of Visual and Performing Arts; the East Asia Program at Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs; Syracuse University Galleries; the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs; Office of Veteran and Military Affairs; the School of Education; the Humanities Center; Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at Arts and Sciences; Syracuse University Study Abroad; the Center for Human Policy; the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications; and the Syracuse University libraries.

BIOGRAPHY: On August 6, 1945, at age 8, Keiko was exposed to the atomic bomb 2.4km away from the hypocenter. She graduated from Hiroshima Jogakuin University in 1959. In 1962, she married Mr. Kaoru Ogura,  director of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and Secretary General of Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. His work engaged in the promotion of A-bomb exhibitions outside Japan. Following her husband's death in 1979, Ogura began working for Hiroshima herself and deepened international exchanges with writers and journalists, becoming an interpreting coordinator for peace-movement visitors from abroad. In 1984, she established Hiroshima Interpreters for Peace and published Hiroshima Handbook, Hiroshima Peace Park Guide, Hip's Hiroshima Guide and One Day in Hiroshima. She was delegated as the official teller of Hiroshima A-bomb experience in English by Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation in 2011. 

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Geocriticism

Oct 27, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Bertrand Westphal (University of Limoges)

Westphal, a humanist of international acclaim known for his work on Geocriticism and spatiality leads a small-group mini-seminar delving into an approach to literature and culture which considers all types of geographical and imaginary peripheries, borders, and maps. Please RSVP to Kathy Everly by October 15 and include any requests for accessibility accomodations.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "LLC 11 Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery." 

top
L

Mapping the Heavens: How Radical Ideas Have Transformed Our Cosmic View

Oct 26, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities - 2017

Priyamvada Natarajan (Yale)

From time immemorial humans have been charting the night sky and trying to make sense of it and contemplating their place in the cosmos.  Dr. Natarajan recounts the evolution of celestial map-making and shows how maps literally track our ever evolving cosmic view. Tracing our understanding of the universe, its contents and its evolution, this Wali lecture will focus on recent developments in our understanding of two invisible entities: dark matter and black holes.

About the presenter:
Dr. Priyamvada Natarajan, Ph.D. holds the Sophie and Tycho Brahe Professorship at the Dark Cosmology Center at the University of Copenhagen, and an Honorary Professorship for life at the University of Delhi

Kameshwar C. Wali is Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus the Department of Physics. Wali is internationally recognized for his scholarship in the symmetry properties of fundamental particles and their interactions, and for his work on the physics of music. He has held positions at Harvard, The University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel), Institutes des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, and the International Center for Theoretical Physics.

The Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities was established by Wali’s daughters, Alaka, Achala, and Monona, as an expression of their admiration and gratitude for his vision, leadership, and dedication to Syracuse University and the community.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Where is the Center of the World? On Literature and Mapping

Oct 26, 2017, 2:30 PM-4:50 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Bertrand Westphal (University of Limoges)

Westphal, a humanist of international acclaim, delivers this public lecture and a three-hour mini-seminar (October 27) to interested students, faculty and staff. Westphal is known for his work on Geocriticism and spatiality. This approach to literature and culture considers all types of geographical and imaginary peripheries, borders, and maps. Geocriticism is an innovative theoretical approach to literature that takes geographical spaces into account.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "LLC 11 Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery." 

top
L

The Politics of Transligualism: After Englishes

Oct 25, 2017, 2:15 PM-3:40 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

a photo related to the event

Jerry Won Lee (University of California, Irvine)

Drawing from his newly released book The Politics of Translingualism: After Englishes, Professor Won Lee discusses the politics of evaluating language, including different Englishes, at a moment of unprecedented linguistic plurality worldwide. He argues for an ongoing need to confront the metadiscourse of plurality and difference and to re-evaluate the very epistemologies of evaluation in the first place.

Presented by:
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
Syracuse University Humanities Center

Co-Sponsors:
Democratizing Knowledge
School of Education
Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
Composition and Cultural Rhetoric Graduate Program


BIOGRAPHY: Jerry Won Lee is an Assistant Professor in the departments of English, Anthropology, East Asian Languages & Literatures, and Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. As an interdisciplinary scholar, the overarching goal of his research has been the examination of the cultural politics of globalization, with a particular focus on questions of “language” and “nation,” oftentimes seeking to understand their interrelationships.  In terms of “language,” Dr. Lee focuses on the politics of multilingualism and “global” Englishes from both theoretical-sociolinguistic and pedagogical angles. In terms of “nation,” he has focused on the official and vernacular functions and forms of ethnic identity in the context of and in spaces beyond the rubric of the nation-state. Dr. Lee has published on these topics in a range of journals, including Verge: Studies in Global AsiasInternational Journal of Applied LinguisticsCollege Composition and CommunicationCollege EnglishNational Identities, and Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.

top
W

Translingual Dispositions: A Teaching Workshop

Oct 25, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

141 Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

Jerry Won Lee (University of California, Irvine)

In this mini-seminar setting, Lee challenges narrow views of Englishes by sharing current theories of translingualism through cutting-edge scholarship from sociolinguistics, critical theory, and composition studies. Please RSVP to Kristen Krouse by October 18 and include any requests for accessibility accomodations.

Presented by:
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
Syracuse University Humanities Center

Co-Sponsors:
Democratizing Knowledge
School of Education
Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
Composition and Cultural Rhetoric Graduate Program


BIOGRAPHY: Jerry Won Lee is an Assistant Professor in the departments of English, Anthropology, East Asian Languages & Literatures, and Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. As an interdisciplinary scholar, the overarching goal of his research has been the examination of the cultural politics of globalization, with a particular focus on questions of “language” and “nation,” oftentimes seeking to understand their interrelationships.  In terms of “language,” Dr. Lee focuses on the politics of multilingualism and “global” Englishes from both theoretical-sociolinguistic and pedagogical angles. In terms of “nation,” he has focused on the official and vernacular functions and forms of ethnic identity in the context of and in spaces beyond the rubric of the nation-state. Dr. Lee has published on these topics in a range of journals, including Verge: Studies in Global AsiasInternational Journal of Applied LinguisticsCollege Composition and CommunicationCollege EnglishNational Identities, and Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art and Architecture of That Day Now

Oct 24, 2017, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium and Marble Room

a photo related to the event

Keiko Ogura (Japan)
Edward Morris, Moderator (The Canary Lab)
Yutaka Sho (Syracuse University)
Linda Zhang (Syracuse University)

Artists and architects who archive, represent, question and disseminate memories of past events will join Hiroshima atomic bomb survivor Keiko Ogura in this panel discussion. Opening reception for the interactive exhibition That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima follows, in the Marble Room at Slocum. 

Related activities:

August 23 - November 26
Exibition: That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

October 19 - November 3
Installation: "That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Slocum Hall Marble Room

October 22
Video Projection: "After Hiroshima Mon Amor" and "Let Me Count the Ways"
Slocum Hall Auditorium

October 24
AM: Ms. Ogura meets with local high school students
Everson Museum of Art

5:30 p.m.: "Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art & Architecture of That Day Now"
Panel discussion and reception
Slocum Hall Atrium

October 23 - 25 - 26 - 27
Ms. Ogura meets with various community groups, students, media

October 28
LLL / Moynihan Symposium: That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs in Post-WWII Japanese Culture
Slocum Hall Auditorium

October 30
Individual / small group meetings with Ms. Ogura, available by appointment; email for information.

November 16
Closing reception for That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

Visit the School of Architecture website for additional details.

"That Day Now" series made possible by:

  • The Japan Foundation
  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
  • Hiroshima Fukuyama Technical High School
  • Hiroshima Motomachi High School
  • Everson Museum of Art
  • Clear Path for Veterans
  • Syracuse City School District
  • Syracuse University units/programs, including: the School of Architecture; The Canary Lab at the College of Visual and Performing Arts; the East Asia Program at Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs; Syracuse University Galleries; the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs; Office of Veteran and Military Affairs; the School of Education; the Humanities Center; Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at Arts and Sciences; Syracuse University Study Abroad; the Center for Human Policy; the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications; and the Syracuse University libraries.

BIOGRAPHY: On August 6, 1945, at age 8, Keiko was exposed to the atomic bomb 2.4km away from the hypocenter. She graduated from Hiroshima Jogakuin University in 1959. In 1962, she married Mr. Kaoru Ogura,  director of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and Secretary General of Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. His work engaged in the promotion of A-bomb exhibitions outside Japan. Following her husband's death in 1979, Ogura began working for Hiroshima herself and deepened international exchanges with writers and journalists, becoming an interpreting coordinator for peace-movement visitors from abroad. In 1984, she established Hiroshima Interpreters for Peace and published Hiroshima Handbook, Hiroshima Peace Park Guide, Hip's Hiroshima Guide and One Day in Hiroshima. She was delegated as the official teller of Hiroshima A-bomb experience in English by Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation in 2011.

top
L

Bringing Theater into Life: Pirandello’s 'Tonight We Improvise,' From Short Story to Theatrical Vision

Oct 19, 2017, 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

311A Huntington Beard Crouse

Pietro Frassica (Princeton)
To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Luigi Pirandello’s birth, Professor Frassica, a leader in Pirandello studies in North America and Europe, investigates the playwright’s strategies in Tonight We Improvise which challenge the thresholds between art and life -- questions still relevant today since the work's 1930 opening in Königsberg, Germany. Tonight We Improvise will appeal to those interested in Modernism, Expressionism, European studies, theater and literature.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Decolonizing Digital Networks: Women of Color Feminism, Open Access, and What it Means to be Woke

Oct 19, 2017, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Gamble Room, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester

a photo related to the event

Presenter:
Lisa Nakamura
(University of Michigan)

Participants:
Joanne Bernardi (University of Rochester)
Kyoko Omori (Hamilton College)
Arnika Fuhrmann (Cornell University)
Leah Shafer (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
Joan Rubin (University of Rochester)
June Hwang (University of Rochester)
A. Joan Saab (University of Rochester)
Morris Eaves (University of Rochester)
Will Bridges (University of Rochester)
Iskandar Zulkarnain (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
Patrick Sullivan (University of Rochester)
Harry Gu (University of Rochester)
Byron Fong (University of Rochester)

This public lunch talk is part of the CNY Humanities Corridor working group DH8: Digital Humanities Speaker Series and the Global DH's "Digitizing Decolonization" theme that seeks to make space for broader perspectives in digital humanities, and to bring otherwise marginalized voices to the fore. To RSVP, please contact Jennie Gilardoni and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
A

Syracuse International Film Festival: 'The Road To Where'

Oct 18, 2017, 6:30 PM-9:30 PM

121 Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

This year's Syracuse International Film Festival kicks off with a screening of The Road To Where, a new feature film by Michal Bat-Adam -- Israel’s first woman feature filmmaker -- and a new documentary about her by Netalie Braun, I Hope I'm in the Frame, which just won the Israeli Academy Award for Best Mid Length Documentary. Syracuse will be the first U.S. festival to screen the piece, since the award.

Michal’s film deals with the human interactions of a group of people who live in an apartment building in Jerusalem that used to be occupied by Arab families. The accompanying documentary shows her struggle to make films and be accepted as an artist in her own right, especially as she is married to Moshe Mizrahi, Israel’s most recognized filmmaker and Academy Award winner.

The 14th annual Syracuse International Film Festival starts Wednesday, October 18th and runs through Sunday, October 22nd.  Students will be admitted free with Syracuse University ID.

top
L
A

Into the Mystic: A Night of Turkish Sufi Music and Poetry with Latif Bolat

Oct 17, 2017, 7:15 PM-9:30 PM

308 Setnor (lecture), Setnor Auditorium (performance)

a photo related to the event

7:15-7:45 p.m. - Lecture in Setnor Room 308

8-9:30 p.m. - Performance in Setnor Auditorium

Musician and scholar Latif Bolat presents an evening of Turkish Sufi songs and devotional poetry by Jalal ad-Din Rumi and Yunus Emre. Bolat has performed in more than a dozen countries, recorded four albums, and composed music for television programs. He is the co-editor of Quarreling with God: Mystic Rebel Poems of the Dervishes of Turkey (White Cloud Press, 2007).

Additional supporters:
South Asian Studies
Performance Live course
Art & Music Histories
Religion

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Foucault, Power, and Government

Oct 16, 2017, 4:30 PM-7:00 PM

Guerlac Room, A.D.E. White House, Society for the Humanities, Cornell University

Paul Patton (University of New South Wales)
Scientia Professor Paul Patton presents a public lecture co-sponsored by PH8 -- Society for the Study of Biopolitical Futures. For more information, please contact Gregg Lambert.
top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Wafaa Bilal: On Art and Resistance

Oct 13, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

Wafaa Bilal (New York University Tisch School)

Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for provoking dialogue about international politics and internal dynamics through high profile, technologically-driven art projects that employ the use of robotics, the internet, and photographic mobile mapping.

By underscoring the powerful associations between Iraq, Islam, and the United States, Wafaa Bilal’s art reflects on the coexistence of the “comfort zone” in the US and the “conflict zone” in the Middle East. These paradigms of conflict and comfort support an unstable binary that disconnects individuals from each other and de-sensitizes them to the struggles of others. Achieving a resolution between the two drives much of the impetus behind his work.

Participants in this mini-seminar will consider Bilal's works as instances of how art initiates dialogues in unexpected ways/places. Please RSVP to Amy Kallander by October 4; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Additional supporters:

  • English
  • History
  • Middle East Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Women's and Gender Studies
top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Performing Change: Diaspora and Belonging

Oct 12, 2017, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Wafaa Bilal (New York University, Tisch School)

Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for provoking dialogue about international politics and internal dynamics through high profile, technologically-driven art projects that employ the use of robotics, the internet, and photographic mobile mapping. For his 2007 installation, Domestic Tension, Bilal spent a month in a Chicago gallery with a paintball gun that people could shoot at him over the internet.

Bilal’s work is constantly informed by the experience of fleeing his homeland and existing simultaneously in two worlds – his home in the “comfort zone” of the U.S. and his consciousness of the “conflict zone” in Iraq. Using his own body as a medium, Bilal continues to challenge our comfort zone with projects like 3rdi and and Counting.... His work can be found in the permanent collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA; Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL; MATHAF: Arab Museum of Modern Art, Doha, Qatar; amongst others. He holds a BFA from the University of New Mexico and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is currently an Associate Arts Professor at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts.


Additional supporters:

  • English
  • History
  • Middle East Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Women's and Gender Studies
top
L

Public Humanities Fellows Showcase

Oct 12, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

CUNY Graduate Center, Skylight Room, 365 Fifth Avenue, NYC

a photo related to the eventMax Hayward, former Fellow at Columbia University
Cara Shousterman, former Fellow at New York University
Thomas Guiler, former Fellow at Syracuse University
Tonya Lewis, former Fellow at the University at Buffalo
Sarah Litvin, former Fellow at the CUNY Graduate Center
Francisco Delgado, former Fellow at Stony Brook University

Humanities New York and the humanities centers of its nine partner universities (see below) welcome all to the Public Humanities Fellows Showcase, featuring six young scholars presenting work on the cutting edge of the growing field of the public humanities. Registration requested.

Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowships are a project of Humanities New York, in partnership with:
  • Binghamton University’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities
  • The City University of New York Graduate Center’s The Center for the Humanities
  • Columbia University’s Heyman Center for the Humanities
  • Cornell University’s Society for the Humanities
  • New York University’s The Center for the Humanities
  • State University of New York at Buffalo’s Humanities Institute
  • State University of New York at Binghamton’s Humanities Institute
  • Syracuse University’s Humanities Center / CNY Humanities Corridor
  • The University of Rochester’s Humanities Center
top
L

[CANCELLED] All the Agents and Saints

Oct 9, 2017, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Bird Library

Stephanie Elizondo Griest (UNC-Chapel Hill)

Unfortunately, this public lecture has been cancelled, with no immediate plans to reschedule.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Embodied Belongings: Exploring the Politics of ‘Queer’ in South Asia

Oct 5, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

a photo related to the event

Vivek Shraya (Toronto)
Multidisciplinary South Asian artist Vivek Shraya will show and discuss a range of media -- literature, song and film -- to highlight the complex relationship between belonging and the body itself.  Her work consistently tackles what it means to belong (and not belong) in relation to family, religion, community spaces, queerness and transness.

Shraya appears as part of the South Asia Center's Fall Symposium -- in collaboration with the Ray Smith Symposium.

Friday, October 6
6:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages
This session features a reading by widely published, award-winning author, Shyam Selvadurai. His novel Funny Boy draws on his experience of being gay in the violent 1980s of Sri Lanka.  


Additional supporters:
South Asia Center
Ray Smith Symposium
Anthropology
Religion
Women’s and Gender Studies
English
LGBTQ Program
Ford Maxwell Professor South Asian Studies

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Deadness: The Social Practices of Sound Reproduction

Oct 4, 2017, 2:00 PM-5:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Benjamin D. Piekut (Cornell University)

Dr. Piekut leads a mini-seminar devoted to two works: his award-winning article “Deadness: Technologies of the Intermundane” (co-authored with Jason Stanyek) and a manuscript version of a second article on “deadness.” To request a copy of the readings and to RSVP for dinner following the event, please e-mail Sarah Fuchs Sampson by 9/27/17.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group LLC10 "Sound & Media."

top
L

Teach-in on Charlottesville

Oct 3, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

a photo related to the event

Panelists:
Zachary Braiterman (Religion)
Kathleen Feyh (Communication & Rhetorical Studies)
Biko Gray (Religion)
Margaret Thompson (History / Political Science)
Meina Yates-Richard (English)

Moderator:
Amy Lutz (Sociology)

Join members of the Syracuse University community for discussion about, and reflections on, Charlottesville. Addressing historical and contemporary contexts and drawing from personal and academic insights, a panel of faculty come together for this teach-in to listen, learn, and jump-start important dialogues about resistance and forging solidarities within and across our communities, in the classroom and beyond.

Download the event flier here.


Additional supporters:
African American Studies
Cultural Foundations of Education
History
Jewish Studies Program
Sociology
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition

top
A
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

An Evening of Spanish Poetry: Aguado and Vilas

Oct 2, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

446 Reilly Hall, Le Moyne College

All are invited to enjoy an evening with award-winning Spanish poets Jesús Aguado and Manuel Vilas as they read from and discuss their work.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "LLC13 Alguien al Otro Lado (SU)."

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lipstick Under My Burkha

Sep 30, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

LIPSTICK UNDER MY BURKHA
Alankrita Shrivastava (India, 2016, 116 min, Hindi with English subtitles)

Set in the crowded lanes of small town India, this film chronicles the secret lives of four women in search of freedom. A burkha-clad college girl struggles with issues of cultural identity and her aspirations to be a pop singer. A young, two-timing beautician seeks to escape the claustrophobia of her small town. An oppressed housewife and mother of three, lives the alternate life of an enterprising saleswoman. And a 55-year-old widow rediscovers her sexuality through a telephone romance. Challenging the prerogatives of the male gaze in popular Indian cinema, Alankrita Shrivastava’s exuberant feminist comedy drama has garnered critical acclaim and awards but also faced a high-profile struggle with the Indian film censorship board over its domestic release.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Plastic China

Sep 30, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

PLASTIC CHINA
Jiu-liang Wang (Hong Kong/China, 2016, 82 min, Mandarin with English subtitles)

Director Jiu-liang Wang captures the striking, melancholic beauty of a vast and lifeless artificial landscape — a Chinese countryside covered almost entirely in imported plastic. Men and women build lives upon this waste, and children learn about the outside world through tattered western advertisements and tabloid images. Yet even within such a profoundly isolating and toxic atmosphere, hope and humanity find their way into the defiantly optimistic 11-year-old Yi-Jie. When she’s not building forts beneath massive plastic mounds, or constructing fake computers from magazine cutouts, Yi-Jie dreams of eating real fruits and raising healthy animals, as well as attending school and befriending kids her own age. She finds a kindred spirit in the young and optimistic Kun, the local recycling facility owner, who dreams, like she does, of one day escaping the plastic countryside and finding a better life. (Sundance Film Festival) 

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Good Postman

Sep 30, 2017, 1:00 PM-3:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

THE GOOD POSTMAN
Tonislav Hristov (Finland/Bulgaria, 2016, 82 min, Bulgarian with English subtitles)

In an almost deserted Bulgarian village on the border with Turkey, known for centuries as “The Great Gate,” there are only 38 voters left. Among the candidates running for mayor is Ivan the postman. He has come up with an unconventional and generous-minded plan to breathe new life into his village. Since the times of the Roman and Ottoman Empires, refugees have been entering Europe through this “gate.” So why not offer the passing Syrian refugees a home and a new beginning in the empty village? In this tragicomic portrait of a sleepy village that suddenly finds itself at the center of current affairs, we see how the villagers’ fears and worries compete with their hope and compassion. Includes discussion with Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Memories of a Penitent Heart

Sep 29, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

MEMORIES OF A PENITENT HEART
Cecilia Aldarondo (USA, 2016, 77 min, closed-captioned in English)

Originating from filmmaker Cecilia Aldarondo’s suspicion that there was something ugly in her family’s past, this film charts her excavation of the buried family conflict around her uncle Miguel’s death, and her search for Miguel’s partner Robert a generation later. After two years of dead ends, Robert turns up: but he’s not the same man. He’s reinvented himself as Father Aquin, a Franciscan monk with twenty-five years of pent-up grief and bitterness. For the first time, a member of Miguel’s family wants to hear Aquin’s side of the story—but is it too little, too late? A story about the mistakes of the past and the second chances of the present, Memories of a Penitent Heart is a cautionary tale about the unresolved conflicts wrought by AIDS, and a nuanced exploration of how faith is used and abused in times of crisis. Includes introduction and Q&A with director Cecilia Aldarondo.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Through Film We Fight On!

Sep 28, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

screenings in various locations

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Themes of “Belonging” weave throughout the program selections in this 15th anniversary year, September 28-30. Screenings are free and open to the public.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for the complete schedule and additional details.

There will also be a workshop opportunity on Friday:

Lunch Seminar with Festival Filmmakers
September 29,
11:30 - 1 p.m.
I3 Center, Room 432-434, Newhouse 3
Presenters: Jeremy Levine, Landon van Soest, Cecilia Aldarondo
RSVP by September 22 to Kristen Northrop (315) 443-7358; include any requests for accessibility accommodations

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

For Ahkeem

Sep 28, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: Opening Night Film and Reception

FOR AHKEEM
Jeremy Levine and Landon van Soest (USA, 2017, 89 min, closed-captioned in English)

Beginning one year before the fatal police shooting of a Black teenager in nearby Ferguson, Missouri, For Ahkeem is the coming-of-age story of Daje Shelton, a Black 17-year-old girl in North St. Louis. She fights for her future as she is placed in an alternative high school and navigates the marginalized neighborhoods, biased criminal justice policies and economic devastation that have set up many Black youth like her to fail. Over two years we watch as Daje struggles to maintain focus in school, attends the funerals of friends killed around her, falls in love with a classmate named Antonio, and navigates a loving-but-tumultuous relationship with her mother. Through Daje’s intimate coming of age story, For Ahkeem illuminates the challenges that many Black teenagers face in America today, and witnesses the strength, resilience, and determination it takes to survive. Includes introduction and Q&A with directors Jeremy Levine and Landon van Soest.

Themes of “Belonging” weave throughout the program selections in this 15th anniversary year, September 28-30. Screenings are free and open to the public.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for complete information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Belonging to the International: Gender, Sexuality, and Communist Identity During the Spanish Civil War

Sep 28, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum (West Chester University, PA)
As an official "Syracuse Symposium" course, the combination of RUS/LIT 400 (Revolution and the Avant-garde in Russia) with SPA 400 (Revolution: Cultural Responses in Spain) welcomes Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum, Professor of Russian History to present this public lecture, open to all.

Dr. Kirschenbaum’s talk will focus on communism as a way of life during the Spanish Civil War. She will explore how communist commitments shaped cultural and political identities as citizens sought to implement Soviet ideologies about class and gender. The incorporation of Communist iconography into Spanish daily life is read as transnational political solidarity during a time of national upheaval.

Kirschenbaum is the author of International Communism and the Spanish Civil War: Solidarity and Suspicion (Cambridge UP, 2015). This study won the Best Book by a Woman in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies awarded by The Association for Women in Slavic Studies.

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Working Between Worlds: Conversation with Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz

Sep 27, 2017, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Janice Harrington
Oliver de la Paz
Following public readings the night prior, poets Harrington and de la Paz meet with interested writers and readers in a small group setting. Please RSVP by September 20 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Poetry and Belonging: Readings by Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz

Sep 26, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

a photo related to the eventAcclaimed poets Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz have dealt with the idea of Belonging in interesting ways: Harrington through her unique explorations of the nursing home community, and the life of African American artist Horace H. Pippin; de la Paz through the themes of immigration and national/ethnic identity. Their reading will be followed by audience Q&A.
top
L

14 Black Classicists: The Politics of American Learning

Sep 21, 2017, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Michele Ronnick (Wayne State University)

This public presentation is part of Syracuse University's African American Studies Department's Fall Colloquium, with a companion exhibit at the Community Folk Art Center. Ronnick's talk provides a historical framework for considering the meanings and purpose of higher education in black struggles for equality.  It maps experiences of black men and women who gained early access to American colleges and universities, including Latinist and activist William Bulkley - the first person of African descent to earn a Ph.D. at SU (1893).  These students, teachers, and scholars of Greek, Latin, ancient history, and pedagogy engaged classicism when it was the ultimate standard of being learned and educational opportunities for black people were limited.  Their endeavors are pertinent as intensified scrutiny of Affirmative Action raises (enduring) questions about whether people of African descent belong in “elite” educational institutions.

Michele Ronnick is author of many pioneering publications, articles, chapters, and reserach notes on black teachers and scholars in the field of classical studies.

top
W
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Processes of Translation: a Workshop in Photo Collage with Artist Suné Woods

Sep 16, 2017, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

Light Work Lab, 316 Waverly Avenue

Space for this Suné Woods workshop is limited.  To register, contact mlhodgen@syr.edu by September 8 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

'You are mine. I see now, I’m a have to let you go.'

Sep 13, 2017, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

a photo related to the event

Exhibit, Reception and Conversation with Suné Woods, Fred Moten and James Gordon Williams 

Los Angeles-based artist Suné Woods creates multi-channel video installations, photographs, sculpture, and collage. Her practice examines absences and vulnerabilities within cultural and social histories. She also uses microcosmal sites such as family to understand the larger sociological phenomenon, imperialist mechanisms, and formations of knowledge. She is interested in how language is emoted, guarded and translated through the absence/presence of the physical body.  Poet Fred Moten and James Gordon Williams will join in conversation.

About the presenters:

Suné Woods has participated in residencies at Headlands Center of the Arts, Vermont Studio Center, The Center for Photography at Woodstock, and Light Work in Syracuse. Woods is a recipient of the Visions from the New California initiative, TheJohn Gutmann Fellowship Award, and The Baum Award for an Emerging American Photographer. Her work has been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Lowe Art Museum, Miami; School of the International Center of Photography, New York; Time Life Building, New York; and The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, and Koplin Del Rio, Los Angeles. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts in 2010.

Fred Moten lives in Los Angeles, where he teaches at the University of California, Riverside. He is author of Arkansas (Pressed Wafer); In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition (University of Minnesota Press); I ran from it but was still in it. (Cusp Books); Hughson’s Tavern (Leon Works); B Jenkins (Duke University Press); and The Feel Trio (Letter Machine Editions), which is a finalist for the National Book Award.

James Gordon Williams is an assistant professor of African American Studies in the College of Arts & Sciences. His research and teaching interests include: Practices of resistance in Afro-diasporic improvisation and composition; performance of racial identity through music technology; epistemologies of African American music; and digital humanities.

top
A

An Outrage: Documentary Film About Lynching in the American South

Sep 12, 2017, 5:00 PM-6:15 PM

220 Eggers Hall

a photo related to the event

Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren (Filmmakers)

All are invited to this free public screening. Filmed on-location at lynching sites in six states and bolstered by the memories and perspectives of descendants, activists, and scholars, this unusual historical documentary educates even as it serves as a hub for action to remember a long-hidden past.

An Outrage was co-directed, -produced, and -edited by Syracuse University alum Lance Warren (A&S, Maxwell ’04). Following its premiere at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in March 2017, the film is on a 20-state tour and in distribution to 500,000 teachers at K-12 schools across the country through the Southern Poverty Law Center.


Co-supporters:
Department of History
Department of Poitical Science
The Humanities Center

top
L
W

Local and Global Contexts of World Englishes

Jun 30, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Syracuse University

Conference June 30 - July 2, 2017

This conference features lectures and workshops on a broad array of topics drawn from a variety of interdisciplinary fields ranging from Information Studies, Computer and Electrical Engineering, Linguistic and Cognitive Sciences to International Business, English, Composition and Rhetoric, Media, Global Affairs and Policy Studies. Link to complete details at the conference website.


Support comes from the Humanities Center in addition to these Syracuse co-sponsors:

Office of the Chancellor

Office of the Vice Chancellor and Provost

College of Arts & Sciences

Office of Research

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Newhouse Center for Global Engagement

IAWE

Kiebach Cener for International Business Studies

Moynihan Global Affairs Institute (The Maxwell School

Center for Advanced Systems and Engineering

Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics

Asian American Studies

Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition

Latino/Latin American Studies Programs

Communication and Rhetorical Studies

Office of Multicultural Affairs

Department of Psychology

SU Abroad and the Associate Provost for International Education

South Asia Center

Linguistic Studies Program

top
A

Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison: Screening and Q&A with Film Writer/Producer Michael Streissguth

Jun 12, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Sutton Pavilion, Syracuse Stage

Michael Streissguth (Le Moyne College)
“Out of darkness comes light” was a pervasive theme for Johnny Cash in his music and personal life. Cash danced on the edge of illegal and illicit and understood the complexity of convicts who are not only perpetrators but also victims. 

In conjunction with its production of Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash, Syracuse Stage will screen the acclaimed documentary, Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison.  Immediately following, the film’s writer & producer, Michael Streissguth will give a talk and engage in Q & A with the audience.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

CNY Ancient Philosophy Spring Workshop

May 6, 2017, 10:30 AM-6:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Jessica Gelber (University of Pittsburgh)
Krisanna Scheiter (Union College)
Ian Hensley (Cornell University)

This semi-annual workshop features presentations and in-depth discussion of current research on a variety of topics in ancient philosophy. Contact cinoble@syr.edu for information or to request accessibility accommodations.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Digital Spaces: 2nd Annual Cornell Graduate Student Digital Humanities Symposium

May 5, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 701, Olin Library, Cornell University

This half-day conference features roundtable panels, discussions and workshops, with an optional second-day co-working session (Saturday, May 6) in the new Olin Digital CoLab at Olin Library.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Humanities NY Graduate Public Humanities Fellows Presentations

Apr 28, 2017, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

Tolley 304 / Sainsbury Library

Jesse Quinn (Ph.D. candidate, Geography )
Kishauna Soljour (Ph.D. candidate, History)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss the experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects with refugee communities in Syracuse and environmental groups in the Adirondacks.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS...

Jesse Quinn Ph.D. candidate in Geography, specializing in political geography and political ecology.
Project Title:  Precious Earth: Stories of Mining and Political Change in the Adirondack Mountains
Quinn's research investigates large industrial mining projects the adirondacks. He spent five years producing wildlife documentaries for National Geographic Television before returning to graduate school, and he plans to continue using these skills in this public humanities documentary.

Kishauna E. Soljour Ph.D. candidate in History, specializing in the modern African Diaspora and transnational history.
Project Title: The Road to Independence: Somali-Bantu Refugee immigration to Syracuse
Soljour's research interests include the use of multi-media in social justice efforts, public policy, immigration, racial identity, gender and citizenship. Her public humanities project will develop 3 short films exploring refugee experiences in the local area.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Foucault to the Second Power: The Posthumous in the Present

Apr 22, 2017, 8:30 AM-5:00 PM

A.D. White House, Cornell University

This 2-day conference (April 21-22) proposes taking a closer look at the remarkable relevance of Michel Foucault’s posthumous work in relation to contemporary society.

For more information, please contact Timothy Campbell.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Sounding Identities: Media and the Sonic Signification of Difference

Apr 21, 2017, 2:00 PM-5:00 PM

Humanities Center, Conference Room D, University of Rochester

Meina Yates-Richard (Syracuse University)

This mini-seminar will focus on the ways in which sound and media have inflected perceptions of differences, whether of race, ethnicity, class, gender, or sexuality.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Foucault to the Second Power: The Posthumous in the Present

Apr 21, 2017, 8:30 AM-5:00 PM

A.D. White House, Cornell University

This 2-day conference (April 21-22) proposes taking a closer look at the remarkable relevance of Michel Foucault’s posthumous work in relation to contemporary society.

For more information, please contact Timothy Campbell.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
A

The Illinois Parables: Screening and Q&A

Apr 20, 2017, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium (401 Harrison Street, Syracuse)

Urban Video Project (UVP) and parent organization, Light Work, are pleased to present this free public screening of Deborah Stratman’s award-winning film The Illinois Parables, followed by Q&A and a reception with the filmmaker. The artist's visit coincides with an ongoing exhibit of Stratman's work -- "Xenoi" -- on display through June 3.
top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

YOU ARE HERE: Expanding the Concept of Place - A Gallery Reception

Apr 20, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Special Collections, 6th floor - Bird Library

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries presents an opening reception for the exhibit, "YOU ARE HERE: Expanding the Concept of Place." 

For most, the term “place” refers to a specific location or a singular state of mind. However, a shift in perspective can redefine “place” to include a vastly wider vocabulary that encompasses displacement, migration, and ways of moving through spaces that connect specifically to the Syracuse community: as in the geographical relevance of the Erie Canal and the imagined destination of the Underground Railroad. The physical manifestation of these historical events and social reform movements are often recorded and defined through handwritten notes, surveyor’s maps, personal photographs and journals. The exhibit “YOU ARE HERE” utilizes rare books, pamphlets, maps, manuscripts, photographs and other artifacts from the permanent collection of the Special Collections Research Center at the Syracuse University Libraries to reframe and expand the notions of what this “place” is, was, and what it can be.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Screening Singapore, Booktalk and Workshop

Apr 20, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

374 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University

Sophia Harvey presents from her forthcoming book Screening Singapore: Sensuous Citizenship Formations and the National. The "Aromatic Images” talk engages with articulations of sensuous citizenship formations that emerge from the inter-sensorial dialogue between the distanced senses of sight and sound and the proximal senses of touch, taste, and smell.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
W

I Am Here: Affirmation as a Form of Resistance

Apr 20, 2017, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

WORKSHOP WITH POET GABRIEL RAMIREZ

Writer, poet, playwright, educator, and activist Gabriel Ramirez conducts a small-group session to follow his evening of poetry (April 19). Ramirez is the 2012 Knicks Poetry Slam Champion and a member of the 2012 Urban Word NYC slam team. Featured in an off-broadway production of “Black Ink” he debuted “Sankofa” a one-man show he wrote and acted in himself, collaborating with award winning choreographer and director, Nicco Annan. Gabriel has performed on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre, United Nations, New York Live Arts, Lincoln Center, Apollo Theatre and other venues & universities around the nation. He has also been featured in the Huffington Post, Vibe Magazine, Blavity, Upworthy and at a TEDxYouth Conference.

Space is limited: please RSVP to pwberry@syr.edu by April 6. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Additional support comes from:

  1. Writing Rhetoric Student Organization
  2. Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  3. Creative Writing Program
  4. Harvey Teres, Dean's Professor for the Public Humanities in English
  5. Verbal Blend
top
A

An Evening of Poetry with Gabriel Ramirez

Apr 19, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Acclaimed spoken-word poet Gabriel Ramirez comes to Syracuse for a public performance (and a writing workshop) on affirmation as a form of resistance. His work has been featured in Huffington Post, Vibe Magazine, and at a TEDxYouth Conference. Ramirez uses powerful language to tackle controversial subjects such as white privilege and what it means to be Afro-Latino.

Requests for accessibility accommodations should be directed to pwberry@syr.edu by April 6.


Additional support comes from:

  1. Writing Rhetoric Student Organization
  2. Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  3. Creative Writing Program
  4. Harvey Teres, Dean's Professor for the Public Humanities in English
  5. Verbal Blend

 

top
A

2nd Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 18, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

a photo related to the event

The Humanities Center celebrates Syracuse University faculty/staff authors whose humanities-related publications were released in 2016. This year's three-dozen releases include fascinating new research, essays, novels, translations and more.  Syracuse University Bookstore staff will be on hand to transact any featured purchases or pre-orders, all at 10% University discounts (except where restricted), and many of these celebrated scholars will be on hand to sign copies of their work. Stop by the reception to browse, buy, and pick-up a commemorative bookmark!

Click to view a reading list from Syracuse University Libraries in support of the SU Humanities Center Book Signing Reception 2017.


The Humanities Center wishes to thank our co-sponsors:

Syracuse University Bookstore

Syracuse University College of Arts & Sciences

Syracuse University Libraries

Syracuse University Office of Research

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Comparison as Relation: From World History to World Literature

Apr 18, 2017, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

214 Hall of Languages

Shu-mei Shih (UCLA)

Contemporary globalization has spurred new conceptualizations of the objects of our research in terms of both scope and scale across the humanities and the social sciences. World literature, as one of the disciplines in the emergence of what can be called global or world studies, is one such example. This lecture will explore how certain world historical approaches would be useful to think along for world literature, and offer relational comparison as a method to better theorize and study world literature.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
L

Living Large in a Waning Public Realm: Intellectual Engagement in a Neoliberal World

Apr 14, 2017, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

104 Tolley Humanities Building

Catherine Tumber (Northeastern University)

Historian, journalist, urban analyst, and independent writer and editor, Professor Tumber is currently Senior Research Associate at the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University.  She is the author of Small, Gritty, and Green: The Promise of America’s Smaller Industrial Cities in a Low-Carbon World (MIT Press, 2012) and articles for the Boston Review, Book Forum, Wilson Quarterly, the Nation, Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, Architectural Record, Raritan, the Baffler, and the Boston Phoenix.    

Sponsored by the Dean’s Professor for the Public Humanities in English, the Department of English, and the Humanities Center

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

DH Lunch Talk: How to #Decolonize the Digital Humanities

Apr 14, 2017, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester

Dorothy Kim (Vassar College)

This talk seeks to make space for broader perspectives in DH and to bring otherwise marginalized voices to the fore.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
L

School-based Mindfulness Interventions for At-risk Youth

Apr 14, 2017, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

123 Sims Hall

a photo related to the event

Dr. Joshua Felver hosts this "brown bag" presentation providing a background in the use of mindfulness-based interventions in public school settings.

Teenagers raised in high-poverty neighborhoods are less likely to succeed in school and are often exposed to maladaptive social behaviors such as community violence and crime. Emerging research suggests that school-based mindfulness practices improve academic and social-emotional outcomes, offering exciting directions for supporting the needs of at-risk youth. This "brown bag" presentation provides a background in the use of mindfulness-based interventions in public school settings and will illustrate these practices by detailing the results from a randomized-control trial of a mindfulness curricula being delivered to Syracuse City School District high school students.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Teaching in Real Time: A Participatory Workshop on Teaching in Music and the Humanities, with Eric Usner

Apr 7, 2017, 9:30 AM-12:00 PM

309 Bowne Hall

This collaborative dialogue aims to foster reflection and lead to renewed resolution about what we are as music educators and why we are called to the work we each do. The goals are thoughtful listening, spirited dialogue, and further collaborative and dialogic pedagogical techniques (concrete activities) and strategies (ideas and theories that techniques enact) to transform our classrooms and courses into encounters in real-time.

 “Humanism is not about withdrawal and exclusion. Quite the reverse: its purpose is to make more things available to critical scrutiny as the product of human labor, human energies for emancipation and enlightenment, and, just as importantly, human misreadings and misinterpretations of the collective past and present.” - Edward Said, Humanism and Democratic Criticism, 22.

What is the work you do? What does it mean to teach? Should our teaching be engaged, site-specific—responsive to the lives of our students, resonating with local, national, and global realities? Perhaps, but only if it has curricular relevance? Or do our responsibilities as teachers extend beyond curricular concerns? Do events beyond the “ivory tower” compel a change in how we act in our roles within? What is higher education’s responsibility in the present moment—in how we arrived here and how we progress? Amidst the constant noise of crises of civil society, democratic governance, forced global migration, continuous war, environmental ruptures, is there a moral imperative to examine why and how we do what we do?

If the humanities are expressions of the human condition, we study them to understand what it has meant to be human, to use them as resource and inspiration in our specific individual and collective explorations of universal questions. What does it mean to teach them—to teach perhaps the most profound expression of all—music. How can music respond to our daily lives, while continuing to foster moments of transformation and hope that nurture the individual and communal capacities to live our lives?

This workshop will not be a lecture, but a collaborative dialogue between participants and guest professor Eric Usner that fosters reflection and leads to renewed resolution about what we are and why we are called to the work we each do. The goals are thoughtful listening, spirited dialogue, and further collaborative and dialogic pedagogical techniques (concrete activities) and strategies (ideas and theories that techniques enact) to transform our classrooms and courses into encounters in real-time. This event is organized primarily by and for those who teach in music, but is open to anyone working in the arts and humanities. We will meet over brunch; reservations required.

 To reserve space or request disability accommodations, please contact Professor Sydney Hutchinson.

ERIC USNER
A teacher, writer, and ethnographer of expressive culture, Eric Martin Usner earned a BA from Dickinson College, an MA from University of California-Riverside, his Ph.D. from New York University. He held a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago and has taught at Riverside & NYU as well as at Sarah Lawrence College, the University of Vienna, the University of Chicago, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University, and in Departments of American Studies and Music at Franklin & Marshall College where he is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Music. He has designed surveys of Western Art, World, American, & popular music, and an array of seminars from a cultural-historical and ethnographic approach to music that integrate fields of musicology, ethnomusicology, jazz studies, and American music. He has also developed courses on critical food studies, the US food system, and material culture within an American Studies curriculum.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
W

THATCamp CNY 2017

Apr 7, 2017, 9:00 AM-4:30 PM

Lower Level, Bird Library

THATCamp CNY 2017 is a day-long "un-conference" open to any interested undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. THATCamp ("The Humanities and Technology Camp") provides a great opportunity for humanists and technologists of all skill levels to learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot. Register online or contact jpwill03@syr.edu for information, or to request accessibility accommodations.
top
L

Doing Antiracist Assessment: Confronting Our Own White Supremacy in the Judgments of Writing

Apr 6, 2017, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Asoa Inoue (University of Washington - Tacoma)

Dr. Inoue offers a brief history of the racism and white supremacy inherent in dominant academic discourses and dispositions of teachers toward language. From this history, he explores possibilities for antiracist writing assessment practices in college classrooms.

Click to view or download the event flier.


Additional support comes from Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, and Communications and Rhetorical Studies.

top
W

Problem-Posing as a Way to Assess Writing with Students

Apr 6, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

a photo related to the event

Asoa Inoue (University of Washington - Tacoma)

Professor Inoue’s workshop explores issues of race, the importance of responding to student diversity in our classrooms, and the assumptions that undergird our assessment practices.  

Contact kjohnson@syr.edu for information or to request accessibility accommodations.


Additional support comes from Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics and Communications and Rhetorical Studies.

top
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Meet The Scholar Coffee Hour

Apr 5, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Tolley Library / Tolley 304

Mauro Novelli (University of Milan, Italy)

This casual gathering provides an opportunity to meet Mauro Novelli, visiting SU for a 3-day series of classroom discussions and a public presentation related to his work focusing on the Fascist years in Italy.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Places of Resistance: Simulation and Dissimulation in Modern Italian Provincial Literature

Apr 4, 2017, 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

Simulation and dissimulation are two rhetorical practices that – despite the more common negative acceptation – hold also positive traits. In "Places of Resistance...," Mauro Novelli (University of Milan, Italy) explores how characters who inhabited the peripheral places of the Italian province during the Fascist years were able to fight the oppressive political regime thanks to dissimulation of their intents.
top
A

The Place of Religion in Film: What Now? Remind Me

Apr 1, 2017, 1:30 PM-5:30 PM

Watson Auditorium

Ray Smith Symposium

Joachim Pinto (Director)

A two-day “Place of Religion in Film” conference (March 31st - April 1st) culminates with Portuguese director Joachim Pinto introducing and facilitating a talkback on his 2013 documentary, What Now? Remind Me, a film that intimately reveals life with HIV, and offers poetic reflections on medicine, human evolution, art, and religion.

•    1:30 - 4:15 p.m., Film screening, Watson Auditorium
•    4:30 - 5:30 p.m., Plenary featuring Joaquim Pinto, director, and Nuno Leonel, cinematographer, Watson Auditorium

View or download the official event flier.


Primary sponsors include the Syracuse University Humanities Council, Humanities Center and Religion Department. 

Additional Syracuse University sponsors include the Jewish Studies Program; Office of Research; Graduate School; English Department; Television, Radio & Film Program; Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Department; and Philosophy Department.

Joaquim Pinto’s plenary session is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts’ 2017 Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds Grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Speculation in Latin America

Apr 1, 2017, 9:30 AM-4:30 PM

Demotte Conference Room in the Campus, IC, Cornell University

Speculation in Latin AmericaSpeculative fiction provides complex reflections on the changes that are produced in the subject and society by technological advances.  For information, please contact Debra Castillo.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
L

The Place of Religion in Film: Son of Saul

Mar 31, 2017, 2:00 PM-6:00 PM

Newhouse

a photo related to the event

Ray Smith Symposium

June Hwang (University of Rochester)
Sara Horowitz (York University) 

Presented as part of the Ray Smith Symposium, this two-day “Place of Religion in Film” conference (March 31st - April 1st) this public plenary features York University Professor Sara Horowitz and University of Rochester Professor June Hwang discussing Jewishness, trauma and memory in their lectures on Lázló Nemes’s 2015 film, Son of Saul.

  • 2 - 3:45 p.m., Film Screening, 141 Newhouse 3
  • 4 - 6 p.m., Plenary lectures with Professors Horowitz and Hwang, 141 Newhouse 3
  • 6 - 7 p.m., Reception, Lobby, Newhouse 1

View or download the official event flier.  


Primary sponsors include the Syracuse University Humanities Council, Humanities Center and Religion Department. 

Additional Syracuse University sponsors include the Jewish Studies Program; Office of Research; Graduate School; English Department; Television, Radio & Film Program; Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Department; and Philosophy Department.

Joaquim Pinto’s plenary session is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts’ 2017 Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds Grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Onondaga Lake: Visualizing the Natural/Historical Continuum

Mar 31, 2017, 9:00 AM-3:30 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

This workshop explores digital methods and tools to visualize the natural and historical continuum of the indigenous, industrial, and post-industrial history of Onondaga Lake. Participants will come away with ideas for how to use digital technologies to layer together and tell stories about seemingly incompatible features, such as the sacred spaces, post-industrial wastebeds, and lost, secret, effaced or poisoned landscapes that make up Onondaga Lake. Includes a visit to Onondaga Lake and Ska-Nonh Great Law of Peace Center.  Participants may choose to attend all day, just morning or just afternoon sessions.

Please contact Jane Read (443-4279) by March 24 to register for the full or half day workshop; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Welikia Project: Discovering a Natural Sense of Place in New York City

Mar 30, 2017, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

100 Falk

a photo related to the event

In this presentation by Dr. Eric Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society, we'll learn how he and his many collaborators have rediscovered the enormous richness and diversity of nature of the place that, through a long process of social-cultural-and natural transformation, has become New York City.  Sanderson describes his process of discovery and how these findings are being used by teachers, government officials and everyday citizens to transform their experience of place, not just with respect to what was, but with an eye toward what can be.

Additional support for Sanderson's visit comes from the SU Departments of Geography, Religion, Ska-Nonh Great Law of Peace Center, and Sustainability Initatives.

PHOTO CREDIT: Historical view: Markley Boyer / The Mannahatta Project / Wildlife Conservation Society; Modern view: Yann-Arthus Bertrand / CORBIS

top
A

Food and Identity - Out Here: A Documentary Film about Queer Farmers in the U.S.

Mar 28, 2017, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Heroy Auditorium

The Food Studies Program in Falk College hosts this screening and Q&A with filmmaker Jonah Mossberg.


Additional support comes from these SU units:

  • Sociology
  • Women's & Gender Studies
  • Anthropology
  • LGBT Studies & Brain Feeders FST student organization
top
A

Kathak: A Dance Concert Featuring Labonee Mohanta

Mar 25, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Marshall Hall, SUNY ESF [1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse]

a photo related to the event

Kathak is a classical dance form from North India. In its 300+ year history, it has influenced the cultures of Asia, Africa and Spain.  Labonee Mohanta, a Kathak dancer of international renown, will be accompanied by Indradeep Ghosh on the violin, Jay Gandhi on the flute, and Indranil Mallick on the Tabla. This performance takes place on the nearby SUNY ESF campus.  Click here to view or download the event flier.


Additional support for this GSO-organized (SPIC MACAY) event comes from South Asia Center, Art & Music Histories, Hendricks Chapel, and the School of Education.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Absurd? Obama, Camus, and the Politics of Hope

Mar 23, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Emerson Auditorium, Palamountain Hall, Skidmore College

David Newheiser (Australian Catholic University)

This talk explores Obama’s politics of hope—a hope that acknowledges its vulnerability but presses forward nonetheless—in the context of the current moment in American political life.


This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Annual Digital Humanities Lecture: Strategic Desire

Mar 15, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Guerlac Room, A.D. White House, Cornell University

Patrick Keilty (University of Toronto)

How do different industries design for desire? Does design work in pornography differ from similar practices in other industries? What can​ theories of desire add to our understanding of how such systems operate?


This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Haunted Ethnography: new experimental documentary

Mar 9, 2017, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium, 401 Harrison Street, Syracuse

a photo related to the event

This group exhibition and related indoor screening showcases six works from an international selection of artists whose work explores the rich but problematic genre of ethnographic documentary as a locus of aesthetic and conceptual innovation in the medium, with an emphasis on the role of places, dislocation, and haunting. Q&A with attending artists and a reception follows the screening. The group exhibition will also be on view in the Everson Plaza.

Featured works / artists:

I’ll Remember You as You Were, Not as What You’ll Become + JaajiApprox., Sky Hopinka
Vague Images at the Beginning and End of the Day + Project Gasbuggy, Carl Elsaesser
Ghost Children + Toré, João Vieira Torres

Learn more at the UVP website.

top
W

Playwright Workshop with Cherríe Moraga (Session 4-of-4)

Mar 3, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Sims Hall 319

Toward a Theater of Consciencia

This 4-session playwriting workshop will introduce students to the basic elements of writing for staged performance, including solo work. Exercises will encourage creative experimentation and critical (political) consciousness drawn personal and embodied experience. The workshop will emphasize the physicalization of character study, dialogue and monologue work drawn from oral traditions, and scene development through improvisation.

Participants should plan to attend all four sessions in the series:

Session 1: February 22 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 2: February 24 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 3: March 1 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 4: March 3 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall

UPDATE: These workshops have filled to capacity - registration is now closed.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
L

Elements of Common Cause: Land and Water in Native and Indigenous Struggles

Mar 3, 2017, 11:00 AM-2:00 PM

Skä•noñh - Great Law of Peace Center, 6680 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool

Cherríe Moraga will read briefly from A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness to open up a trans-national and cross-cultural conversation on land, water, sovereignty, spirit-practice, and community.  This community dialogue is hosted by Native American Studies.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
W

The Humanities as Profession and Practice

Mar 2, 2017, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

114 Bird Library (Peter Graham Room)

Teresa Mangum (University of Iowa)

Many humanities departments ask how they can prepare their graduate students for diverse careers. In many cases, graduate students are quietly going rogue, creating their own opportunities. However, some departments are also threading an “applied” approach to the humanities through students’ scholarly studies. Professor Mangum, a national leader in the public humanities, presents successful examples while reflecting on the challenge of maintaining the intellectual values of humanities departments while also expanding students’ opportunities.  

top
L

Theory in the Flesh: Insurgent Knowledge and Radical Praxis

Mar 2, 2017, 11:00 AM-1:00 PM

Kilian Room (500 Hall of Languages)

Conveners for this conversation with Cherríe Moraga include Pedro Javier DiPietro (WGS), Kathryn Everly (LLL), Myrna Garcia-Calderon (LLL/LAS), Aja Martinez (WSRC), and Silvio Torres-Saillant (ENG).


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
W

Playwright Workshop with Cherríe Moraga (Session 3-of-4)

Mar 1, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Sims Hall 319

Toward a Theater of Consciencia

This 4-session playwriting workshop will introduce students to the basic elements of writing for staged performance, including solo work. Exercises will encourage creative experimentation and critical (political) consciousness drawn personal and embodied experience. The workshop will emphasize the physicalization of character study, dialogue and monologue work drawn from oral traditions, and scene development through improvisation.

Participants should plan to attend all four sessions in the series:

Session 1: February 22 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 2: February 24 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 3: March 1 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 4: March 3 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall

UPDATE: These workshops have filled to capacity - registration is now closed.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
L

The Native Country of a Heart: A Geography of Desire

Feb 28, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

001 Life Science Building

Cherríe Moraga reads from her forthcoming memoir.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
L
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Colloquium Disrupting Genre, Gender, and Generation: Conversations with Maestra Cherríe Moraga

Feb 27, 2017, 2:15 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

This panel discussion moderated by SU's Myrna García-Calderón includes:

Presenters
Mary Pat Brady (Cornell)
Helena María Viramontes (Cornell)
Michelle Martin-Baron (Hobart & William Smith)
Eddy Alvarez (SUNY-Oneonta)

Respondents
Cristina Serna (Colgate)
Aja Martinez (Syracuse)
Pedro DiPietro (Syracuse)


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.  Additional support comes from the CNY Humanities Corridor.

 
top
A

Caribbean Cinematic Festival

Feb 25, 2017, 11:00 AM-5:00 PM

Community Folk Art Center, 805 E. Genesee Street, Syracuse

The Community Folk Art Center highlights the richness of Caribbean culture through a series of film screenings, performances, workshops and discussions, February 23-26, thanks to support from African American Studies and the College of Arts & Sciences.

The Humanities Center is pleased to provide support for Saturday's film festival. The tentative schedule includes:

11 a.m.
Songs of Redemption (Jamaica) – 1 hour 18 minutes
A group of inmates at the General Penitentiary in Kingston, Jamaica are involved in a rehabilitation program based in music.

1:30 p.m.
Murder in Pacot (Haiti) - 2 hours 10 minutes
After the terrible January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, a privileged couple struggles to reinvent a life amid the rubble of their villa in Port-au-Prince's upscale neighborhood of Pacot. Destitute and in desperate need for money to repair their home, the couple decides to rent the remaining habitable part of the villa to Alex, a high-level foreign relief worker, accompanied by Jennifer, aka Andrémise, his sassy, ambitious Haitian girlfriend.

4 p.m.
Dominica – 45 minutes
This is part 2 of a domentary depicting the aftermath of the earthquake that hit Dominica in October of 2016. 

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Media Studies and Popular Culture in Contemporary Japan Conference

Feb 25, 2017, 10:30 AM-5:00 PM

Kilian Room (500 Hall of Languages)

Joanne Bernardi (University of Rochester)
Aaron Gerow (Yale University)
Ogawa Hitoshi (Yamaguchi University, Japan)
Josh Romphf (University of Rochester)
Paul Roquet (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Fukuya Toshinobu (Yamaguchi University, Japan)
Rebecca Xu (Syracuse University) 

The Media Studies and Popular Culture in Contemporary Japan Conference brings together leading scholars from the U.S. and Japan to discuss emerging questions and recent research related to Japanese film, media, and culture studies.  Mixing structured scholarly presentations with open-ended dialogue and exhibitions of creative work, the conference connects a range of perspectives in Japan Studies to broader dialogues in the humanities writ large.  

top
W

Playwright Workshop with Cherríe Moraga (Session 2-of-4)

Feb 24, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Sims Hall 319

Toward a Theater of Consciencia

This 4-session playwriting workshop will introduce students to the basic elements of writing for staged performance, including solo work. Exercises will encourage creative experimentation and critical (political) consciousness drawn personal and embodied experience. The workshop will emphasize the physicalization of character study, dialogue and monologue work drawn from oral traditions, and scene development through improvisation.

Participants should plan to attend all four sessions in the series:

Session 1: February 22 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 2: February 24 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 3: March 1 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 4: March 3 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall

UPDATE: These workshops have filled to capacity - registration is now closed. 


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
W

Humanities Book Publishing Workshop with SUNY Press and SU Press

Feb 24, 2017, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Those interested in learning more about publishing a book in the humanities can brush up on best practices in a workshop led by:

Beth Bouloukos, Senior Acquisitions Editor, SUNY Press
Suzanne E. Guiod, Editor-in-Chief, Syracuse University Press

Through brief presentations and Q&A, participants will learn...

• How to effectively connect with an editor and find the press that is best for you
• Qualities of compelling book proposals and what editors look for
• What authors should consider when publishing their first book
• Tips and strategies for publishing in mid-career

Download the event flier to print or post.

Contact humcenter@syr.edu to request accessibility accommodations.


About the speakers…

Beth Bouloukos holds a Ph.D. from Cornell and taught at Fairfield University before pursuing editorial work, with particular interest in Latin American literatures and cultures, gender and queer studies. Beth is currently a senior acquisitions editor at SUNY Press and an affiliated member of the Languages, Literatures and Cultures Department at SUNY Albany.

Suzanne E. Guiod was appointed editor-in-chief at Syracuse University Press in 2012, after serving many years as editorial director of the University of Rochester Press. She has more than 15 years’ editorial experience in scholarly, professional, and trade publishing, and currently acquires projects in Middle East Studies, Arab American Studies, peace and conflict resolution, disability studies, and the history of sport.

About the presses…

A publisher of distinguished research and notable works of general interest since 1966, SUNY Press supports the commitments of the State University of New York to teaching, research, and public service. The press sponsors nationally recognized publication lists in African American studies, Asian studies, environmental studies, Indigenous studies, Italian American studies, Jewish studies, philosophy, political science, queer studies, religion, transpersonal psychology, and women’s studies. Through its Excelsior Editions imprint, the press produces exceptional works for all readers and showcases the peoples, histories, and natural beauty of the New York region.

Founded in 1943 by Chancellor William Pearson Tolley, Syracuse University Press is committed to serving scholars, promoting diverse cultural and intellectual expression, and preserving the history, literature, and culture of our region. SU Press produces rigorously edited, beautifully designed, and critically acclaimed books in specialized areas including Middle East Studies, Irish Studies, Native American Studies, Jewish cultural and literary history, peace and conflict resolution, television and popular culture, sports and entertainment, and New York State topics.

top
A

Speaking in Tongues

Feb 23, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

La Casita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco Street, Syracuse

This multi-faceted event includes a public reception, a screening of "En Memoriam," and a performance of Gloria Anzaldúa's "Speaking in Tongues" with choreography by Cherríe Moraga.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
L

Roundtable: Remembering This Bridge Called My Back

Feb 23, 2017, 2:00 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

Maria Lugones (Binghamton University)
Vivien Ng (University at Albany)
Margo Okazawa-Rey (Hamilton College) 
Susy Zepeda (UC-Davis)
Gwen Pough (Syracuse University)


Chandra Talpade Mohanty (SU Women's and Gender Studies Chair) moderates a panel of speakers on This Bridge Called My Back, an anthology of writings by women of color, co-edited by Cherríe Moraga, this year's Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
W

Playwright Workshop with Cherríe Moraga (Session 1-of-4)

Feb 22, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Sims Hall 319

Toward a Theater of Consciencia

This 4-session playwriting workshop will introduce students to the basic elements of writing for staged performance, including solo work.  Exercises will encourage creative experimentation and critical (political) consciousness drawn personal and embodied experience.  The workshop will emphasize the physicalization of character study, dialogue and monologue work drawn from oral traditions, and scene development through improvisation. 

Participants should plan to attend all four sessions in the series:

Session 1: February 22 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 2: February 24 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 3: March 1 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall
Session 4: March 3 (6-8 p.m.), 319 Sims Hall

UPDATE: These workshops have filled to capacity - registration is now closed.


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
A

Welcome Reception: An Evening with Cherríe Moraga

Feb 21, 2017, 4:30 PM-5:30 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Members of the campus community are invited to welcome Cherríe Moraga to Syracuse for her two-week residency as this year's Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor.  Enjoy refreshments, a book-signing, and introductory remarks from and about Moraga, a poet, playwright-director, writer-essayist, educator and cultural activist.
top
A

The Mathematics of Love, Play Reading

Feb 20, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Syracuse Stage

a photo related to the event

The Department of Drama hosts a reading of The Mathematics of Love (written by Cherríe Moraga, Directed by Misha Chowdhury).


This event is part of the 2017 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series.

top
A

Disadvantage and Discipline: Jackiem Joyner's Artistic Journey

Feb 20, 2017, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

a photo related to the eventJackeim Joyner, Billboard #1 saxophonist and emergent author, describes his path from emancipated student (having attended Fowler High School in Syracuse) to renowned artist. Joyner's sounds and stories mix with panel discussion from Sydney Hutchinson (Art and Music History) and Meina Yates-Richard (English), moderated by Kal Alston, Executive Director of the Community Folk Art Center.
top
L
W
A

Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor: Cherríe Moraga

Feb 20, 2017, 12:00 AM-8:00 PM

See individual entries for locations

a photo related to the event

This year's Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor is Cherríe Moraga, Artist-in-Residence in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies and the Comparative Program of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University.

Moraga’s body of work contributes centrally to an inclusive humanities horizon for the twenty first century. She is widely recognized for groundbreaking interventions in literature, drama, and feminist activism and theory. An array of lectures and workshops will connect Moraga to students and interested publics during her two week residency in Syracuse.  View or download the announcement of Watson events.

Scheduled activities:

February 20, 7 - 9 p.m.
The Mathematics of Love, Play Reading
Hosted by the Department of Drama / Syracuse Stage

February 21, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.
Welcome Reception
Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

February 22, 6 - 8 p.m.
Playwright Workshop (Session 1-of-4)
319 Sims Hall

February 23, 2 - 5 p.m.
Roundtable: Remembering This Bridge Called My Back
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

February 23, 6 - 8 p.m.
Screening / Performance: Speaking in Tongues
La Casita Cultural Center

February 24, 6 - 8 p.m.
Playwright Workshop (Session 2-of-4)
319 Sims Hall

February 27, 2:15 - 5 p.m.
Colloquium Disrupting Genre, Gender, and Generation: Conversations with Maestra Cherrie Moraga
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

February 28, 7 - 9 p.m.
The Native Country of A Heart, public lecture
001 Life Science Building

March 1, 6 - 8 p.m.
Playwright Workshop (Session 3-of-4)
319 Sims Hall

March 2, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Theory in the Flesh, Undergrad Dialogue
500 Hall of Languages

March 3, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Elements of Common Cause: Land and Water in Native and Indigenous Struggles
Skä•noñh - Great Law of Peace Center

March 3, 6 - 8 p.m.
Playwright Workshop (Session 4-of-4)
319 Sims Hall

Partners and Co-Sponsors include:
Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies, Democratizing Knowledge Collective, Department of Drama, English Department, Goldring Arts Journalism Program, La Casita Cultural Center, State University of New York Press, LaLUCHA (Latino Undergraduates Creating Change in America), Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Latino and Latin American Studies Program, LGBT Studies Program, Native American and Indigenous Studies Program, Skä•noñh Great Law of Peace Center, Syracuse Stage, Women’s and Gender Studies, Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, The Writing Program. 


The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship established by the Watson family to support the visits of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists. Previous holders of the professorship include: Saul Bellow, Laura Freixas, Noam Chomsky, Angela Davis, Hans Mommsen, Toni Morrison, Mario Vargas Llosa, Leo Steinberg, Teresa de Lauretis, Stephen Greenblatt, Anthony Grafton, and Margaret Atwood.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Vision of Sound: (making) PLACE

Feb 17, 2017, 7:30 PM-9:15 PM

Carrier Theater, Civic Center, Syracuse

The award-winning Society for New Music celebrates its 45th season by gathering an impressive roster of upstate composers and choreographers to collaborate on new works focused on what "place" has meant in their lives.

Choreographers:
Rose Pasquarella Beauchamp (Alfred University)
Brandon Ellis (Syracuse University)
Nanako Horikawa Mandrino (SUNY-Brockport)
Edward Murphy (SUNY-Brockport)
Cheryl Wilkins-Mitchell (SUNY-Oswego)
Kaitley Wozer (Hobart-William Smith Colleges)

Musicians:
Rob Auler (SUNY-Oswego)
John Friedrichs (Syracuse University)
Ahreum Kim (Liverpool)
Jennifer Vaughn (Syracuse University)

Find complete details at the official website.

top
L

Writing Our Lives as a Space of Healing in Troubling Times

Feb 17, 2017, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

123 Sims Hall

a photo related to the event

Marcelle HaddixChair of Reading and Language Arts; Dean's Associate Professor, Director of RLA Doctoral Programs

Young people are increasingly dealing with violence and experiencing trauma in their everyday lives.  Schools and communities must be prepared to help students deal with these lived realities.  This Contemplative Collaborative "brown bag" presentation and discussion highlights the experiences of young writers, teachers, parents, artists, and community members who partner together to cultivate spaces for authentic writing practices through the Writing Our Lives youth writing project for students in grades 6-12 in the greater Syracuse area.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Juan Juarez: Corpus

Feb 16, 2017, 5:00 PM-8:00 PM

Point of Contact Gallery, Nancy Cantor Warehouse, 350 W. Fayette Street, Syracuse

Corpus is a multi-media exhibition and presentation by Syracuse University professor and artist Juan Juarez. The collection includes photographs and videos that explore the meaning of space/place and a human desire to leave tangible remains after death, providing context to a larger physical existence.
top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Queering Sexy B(l)ack: Queer Youth and Pedagogies of Sexual Agency

Feb 9, 2017, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Edward Brockenbrough, Ph.D. (University of Rochester)

Despite growing concerns in recent years over the plight of queer students in American schools, efforts to make schools more responsive to the needs of queer youth continue to fall short of queer-inclusive sexual health education. For Black queer youth in particular, the limited access to sex education in public schools persists as the stakes surrounding their sexual health have intensified. This presentation will draw upon findings from multiple scholarly projects to explore how Black queer youth engage in pedagogical acts that nurture their sexual agency, and it will consider how P-12 educators and other select stakeholders can support Black queer youth and other queerly identified young people in ways that are culturally responsive and socially just. 

Dr. Edward Brockenbrough, Associate Professor of Teaching and Curriculum in the Warner School of Education at the University of Rochester, focuses on negotiations of identity, pedagogy, and power in urban educational spaces, particularly through the lenses of Black masculinity studies and queer of color critique.  Dr. Brockenbrough's visit is hosted by the School of Education within this year's Douglas P. Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

University Lectures: Jhumpa Lahiri

Feb 7, 2017, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

a photo related to the event

Jhumpa Lahiri was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2000 for Interpreter of Maladies (Houghton Mifflin, 1999) her debut story collection exploring issues of love and identity among immigrants and cultural transplants. She delved further into the immigrant experience with The Namesake (Houghton Mifflin, 2003), which was made into a Fox Searchlight feature film in 2007.

Her book of short stories, Unaccustomed Earth (Alfred A. Knopf, 2008), won the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award -- the world’s largest prize for a short story collection -- and was a finalist for the Story Prize. Lahiri’s The Lowland (Alfred A. Knopf/Random House, 2013) won the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature and was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Award for Fiction.

Lahiri's most recent work, In Other Words (Alfred A. Knopf, 2016) explores the often emotionally fraught links between identity and language.

This appearance is part of SU's University Lectures series, with additional support from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Syracuse University Humanities Center, as part of its Syracuse Symposium series.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Place and Displacement: Staging Diverse Cultural Geographies in American Theater

Jan 29, 2017, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Sutton Pavilion, Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee St., Syracuse

Christian DuComb (Colgate University)
M. Gail Hamner (Syracuse University)
Clea Hupp (University of Arkansas)
Emad Rahim (Kotouc Family Endowed Chair and Professor at Bellevue University)

In conjunction with its production of Disgraced, Syracuse Stage will host a panel of cultural scholars, theatre artists, and community members for an in-depth public discussion following the matinee performance on Sunday, January 29.

If we understand cultural geography as the study of cultural products and norms and their variations across and relations to spaces and places, what is the theatrical meaning of cultural geographies? How have contemporary writers such as Ayad Akhtar used the stage to explore and interrogate one’s relationship to place. And when does theatre become a provocative act of cultural displacement? This panel discussion is indented for community-wide audiences interested and eager to engage important and relevant questions about the role of art, especially theatre, in problematizing issues and discussion of race, religion, culture and place.

top
L

Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows Presentations

Jan 27, 2017, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

Tolley 304

a photo related to the event

This year's Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows briefly discuss their work and engage in a Q&A / feedback session. Coffee and light breakfast will be available. [View / download a postable / shareable flier for this event.]

Amy Burnette, Ph.D. Candidate, English
Good on-set boads good end: Poetics of Origin in Edmund Spenser's Two Cantos of Mutabilitie
The fragmentary nature of Edmund Spenser’s Two Cantos of Mutabilitie, an apparently unfinished book of his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590; 1596), has been a subject of extensive debate. Published posthumously in 1609, it is unclear as to whether the Cantos were intended as a final installment to Spenser’s epic, part of a continuation thereof, or if they constitute a standalone poem. Drawing on English Renaissance ideas about memory, Burnette shows what the poem reveals, self-reflexively, about its incomplete status, arguing that the Cantos are crafted as a miniature analog of Spenser’s larger poetic process in The Faerie Queene.

Jessica Pauszek, Ph.D. Candidate, Composition and Cultural Rhetoric
Access, Inclusion, and Preservation: Building The Federation of Worker Writers and Community Publishers Archive
This presentation focuses on the collaborative, transnational print and digital archive which documents a network of community writing groups known since 1976 as The Federation of Worker Writers and Community Publishers (FWWCP). Through a discussion of access, inclusion, and preservation, Pauszek argues that such collective work encourages us to consider the discursive boundaries and material conditions of embodied labor. Collaboration shifts how we understand knowledge production and literacy practices across community and university spaces.

top
W

Humanities Research Roundtable: Archival Methods

Dec 9, 2016, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

The Humanities Center aims to foster intellectual community, highlight humanities scholarship at SU, and support humanities research.  A range of humanities scholars, working in different disciplines, eras, and cultural contexts, assembles in this roundtable to discuss how they engage in archival research. Enjoy coffee and a light breakfast as we hear more about our colleagues’ fascinating work!

Presenters include:
Joan Bryant (African American Studies)
Norman Kutcher (History)
Scott Stevens (Native American Studies & English)
Patrick Williams (Digital Humanities & SU Libraries)
Sascha Scott (Art History & Native American Studies)
Stephen Parks (Writing Studies, Rhetoric, Composition)
Beth Ferri (Disability Studies)
Wayne Franits (Art History)
Mario Rios Perez (Cultural Foundations of Education)
Amanda Winkler (Music History and Cultures)

Contact humcenter@syr.edu with any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Download the event flier.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Inside the Brain: Synapses Lost and Found in Development and Alzheimer's Disease

Dec 8, 2016, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Lyman 132

a photo related to the event

Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities

The 2016 Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture will be presented by distinguished neuroscientist Dr. Carla Shatz, Director of Bio-X at Stanford University and most recently recipient of the 2016 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience. 

In her talk, Shatz explains how connections in the adult brain are precise, but do not start out that way. Precision emerges during critical developmental periods as synapses - the delicate contacts between neurons that relay and store information - are either pruned away or grow in a process driven by learning. An unexpected set of molecules once thought only to function in the immune system was discovered in neurons and found to regulate pruning. Blocking the function of these molecules not only reopens a critical period for vision in adult brain, but also protects against memory loss in mice models of Alzheimer’s disease. New avenues for treating developmental disorders and AD may come from understanding the function of these molecules in the brain.

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Performance/History: Remembering the Dérive: Attunement, Mimesis, and Performance in the City

Nov 18, 2016, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Little Hall 201, Colgate University

Professor Elin Diamond (Rutgers University) is best known for her book, Unmaking Mimesis: Essays on Feminism and Theater, and her edited volume, Performance and Cultural Politics. She's also the author of Pinter's Comic Play and numerous articles that explore theater and performance through the lens of feminist and critical theory. Her seminar will be followed by a casual dinner. Professor Diamond will share a few texts for attendees to read in preparation; To RSVP, please contact Mary Simonson.
top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

The sonic mask: Digging up ethnicity and racism through music – The Dominican case

Nov 18, 2016, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Mini-Seminar with Darío Tejeda 

Visiting scholar, member of the Academy of Sciences of the Dominican Republic and director of the Instituto de Estudios Caribeños (INEC, Santo Domingo and New York City) Darío Tejeda, will explore the topics of music, race, and activism in the Dominican Republic and beyond. Participants are encouraged to attend the performance by New York City-based Afro-Dominican music group Pa’lo Monte on Tuesday, November 15 at 7 PM at the Community Folk Art Center.

Space for the mini-seminar is limited; please RSVP to Sydney Hutchinson. Include any requests for accommodations.

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Alguien al Otro Lado: Fall Roundtable on Poetry

Nov 15, 2016, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

340G Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

Three poets from Spain will discuss the theme of happiness in contemporary poetry with comments from Professor Josefa Alvarez and Professor Kathy Everly. 

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Early Modern Spanish: Literature, Politics and the Public Sphere in the Early Modern Mediterranean

Nov 11, 2016, 9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Kilian Room (500 Hall of Languages)

This workshop brings together scholars from the Central New York area and other nearby regions in order to discuss topics related to the relationship between Spain and the Mediterranean in the Early Modern period. Presentations will focus on a variety of Spanish literary and historical texts, as well as key individuals and events, that illustrate the complex cultural and political reality of the Mediterranean world, and how the different peoples of the region interacted with the dynamics of the Spanish Habsburgs empire. Presentations will be in Spanish and English.

For more information, contact Alejandro Garcia-Reidy.

top
L

African American Studies Colloquium: Black Lives Matter in Art, History, and Literature

Nov 9, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Slocum Hall 214

This colloquium features scholars in art, history, and literature whose interdisciplinary research intersects with the current social and political conversations surrounding the modern civil rights movement, Black Lives Matter. Discussion focuses on the importance of the Humanities in shaping “Black World” responses to freedom, civil rights, and justice movements. Participants on the panel include: Clemmie Harris, Ph.D., African American Studies, Meina Yates-Richard, Ph.D., English and Casarae Gibson, Ph.D., African American Studies.
top
A

Galician Landscapes in The Winterlings, by Cristina Sánchez Andrade

Nov 8, 2016, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Tolley 304 / Sainsbury Library

a photo related to the event

Award-winning bilingual author, Cristina Sánchez Andrade, stops in Syracuse to present the recent translation of her 2014 novel, The Winterlings (in English). In this meet-and-greet setting, Andrade will sell and sign copies of her book as she talks about her craft and current Spanish literature.

Space is limited; please RSVP to Kathy Everly by 11/1/16.  Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective: When Sacred Space Becomes a Heritage Place: Pilgrimage, Worship, and Tourism in Contemporary China

Nov 7, 2016, 2:10 PM-3:30 PM

341 Eggers Hall

Professor Robert Shepherd (George Washington University) co-presents this talk with Professor Shin-yi Chao of the University of Rochester. For more information, contact Gareth Fisher. gfisher@syr.edu

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Jewish Studies: Technologies of Memory Series “Memory and Post-Memory”

Nov 5, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Barnes Hall, Cornell University

This presentation on memory and post-memory features Marianne Hirsch (Columbia) and Leo Spitzer (Dartmouth). For more information, contact Ayla Cline.

top
W
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellowship: Info Session about Applying for 2017-18 Fellowships and Presentation by Scarlett Rebman, 2015-16 Fellow

Nov 4, 2016, 10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Tolley 304 / Sainsbury Library

a photo related to the event

2015-2016 Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellow Scarlett Rebman (History) and colleagues discuss working with the Southwest Community Center on her project, “Time Travelers: A Local History Summer Camp.”  In the camp project, students explored local struggles for human rights by taking field trips throughout central New York.

Following her presentation, Rebman and representatives from the CNY Corridor provide information and answer questions about the Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowship Rebman served, and about the application process for the upcoming selection.  

The next application deadline is February 17, 2017.  Click to browse the fellowship FAQs and download the call for applicants.

A joint initiative between the Humanities Center and the Central New York Humanities Corridor, these fellowships are supported in partnership with the New York Council for the Humanities supported in part by Daniel and Joanna Rose and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

top
A

Gustav Deutsch and Hanna Schimek present Shirley: Visions of Reality (2013)

Nov 3, 2016, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Huntington-Beard Crouse, Kittredge Auditorium

Gustav Deustch and Hanna Schimek will accompany a screening of their film, Shirley: Visions of Reality. Shirley is constructed of shots that are composed to closely replicate Edward Hopper using remarkable trompe l'oeil effects. All are welcome to join film studies students in this opportunity to meet and work with the visiting filmmakers.
top
W

Workshop with Filmmakers Gustav Deutsch and Hanna Schimek

Nov 3, 2016, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Tolley 304

Viennese artists Gustav Deutsch and Hanna Schimek lead a small group discussion prior to a screening of their film Shirley: Visions of Reality (2013), based on the work and life of American painter Edward Hopper. Drawing from the lives of Hopper and his wife, painter Josephine Nivison (who was sometimes called “Shirley” when modeling for Hopper), the film intimately explores a narrative of recollections and shifting social and cultural norms in the U.S. from the 1920s to the early 1960s.  Space is limited; contact cphanson@syr.edu for availability. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Site Specific Art and Native History

Nov 2, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Tolley 304

New York based Mohawk artist, Alan Michelson, conducts a small-group workshop for students from the visual arts and art history as well as those interested in the Native American aspect of his work.  He'll discuss the associated challenges, opportunities, and meditation on how a Native American visual artist draws on historical notions of place and its intimate relationship to the indigenous peoples connected to it.

Advanced registration required. RSVP to humcenter@syr.edu by 10/24/16. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing Place Through Indigenous Histories

Nov 1, 2016, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

a photo related to the eventNew York based Mohawk artist, Alan Michelson, who recently won a commission to create a permanent monument to the Native nations of what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia, will talk about his art and the issues that inform its creation.  Michelson’s artwork is perfectly suited for a meditation on how a Native American visual artist draws on historical notions of place and its intimate relationship to the indigenous peoples connected to it.
top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective: Lecture on Islam in Tibet

Oct 27, 2016, 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Rush Rhees Library, Room 442, University of Rochester

Professor David Atwill (Penn State) explores the roots of Muslims in Tibet and offers an overview of their central role in the diplomatic tensions between India and China in 1960.  [Download the event flier here.]

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Anna Karenina

Oct 23, 2016, 5:00 PM-8:00 PM

Crouse-Hinds Hall 101

This free, public screening of the 2012 film Anna Karenina, directed by Joe Wright, includes a panel discussion on the roles of place and space in Tolstoy’s novel and the movie’s use of stage sets to capture or subvert those roles. Panelists include Dr. Rachel May, former professor of Russian literature at Macalester College and SUNY Stony Brook, and Karel Blakely, professor of scenic design and stagecraft at Le Moyne College. Refreshments will be provided. 

Space is limited; please RSVP to Rachel May.

top
L

American Sisters: Sarah and Angelina Grimke and the First Fight for Human Rights

Oct 21, 2016, 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

Eggers 151

Louise Knight, author of two biographies of Jane Addams, will discuss her book-in-progress, a dual biography of the Grimke sisters, pioneering 19th c. American abolitionists and feminists.

The sisters, born in Charleston, S.C. to a wealthy slaveowning family, fled north in the 1820s to Philadelphia to escape life in a slave state. But their horror at slavery did not translate into social action until the new, immediate abolition movement persuaded them that the institution of slavery could end. They joined the campaign, lecturing widely, organizing abolition societies and gathering petition signatures on slavery.  They were the first American women to travel, lecture and organize for a secular cause. The opportunities the movement gave them and its emphasis in these years on human rights helped the sisters reinterpret their lives as women, while friendships with African American Quaker abolitionists deepened their understanding of racism.

top
W

Interested in Pursuing Humanities Funding & Fellowships? Learn about Support Tools and Resources Available for Research!

Oct 21, 2016, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

Tolley 304 / Sainsbury Library

Faculty and graduate students are invited to learn more about a range of University resources for pursuing Humanities grants, fellowships, and awards.

In this workshop we will cover:

• Using "Pivot" for tailored / curated searches
• Using "Grants Advisor" to identify humanities funding
• Other guides to funding in the humanities and interpretive social sciences
• Research support from SU Librarian specialists in the Humanities

Specialized staff from the Office of Sponsored Projects and the Libraries will introduce these tools and engage in Q&A with participants. Coffee and light breakfast available. Download the flier to post or share with interested colleagues.

Hosted by the Humanities Center, this event is supported by the Office for Research, OSP and the Syracuse University Libraries.

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Urban Video Project's Screening + Q&A with Apichatpong Weerasethakul: Cemetery of Splendor

Oct 20, 2016, 6:30 PM-9:00 PM

Everson Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium, 401 Harrison Street, Syracuse

a photo related to the event

Fresh from the Cannes Film Festival, experience the latest feature-length film by celebrated Thai filmmaker, Apichatpong Weerasethakul at this screening of Cemetery of Splendor. The filmmaker conducts a live-stream Q&A following the screening. Attendees are invited to stay for a reception.


The screening of Cemetery of Splendor and Q&A with the filmmaker is made possible through the generous support of CNY Humanities Corridor and the Syracuse University Visiting Artist Lecture Series. This event is part of the official program of the 2016 Syracuse International Film Festival

top
A

Syracuse International Film Festival

Oct 19, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

various screening locations

a photo related to the eventThe Humanities Center is a co-sponsor of the 13th annual Syracuse International Film Festival.  Screenings take place October 19-23 at various locations throughout the Syracuse area.  

Visit the official festival website for details or download the schedule here.
top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Critical Asian Cinematic Spaces Seminar: “Is Art Lighthearted?”

Oct 18, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

325 Slocum Hall

Led by Una Chung, PhD, Assistant Professor of Modern and Classical Literatures (Sarah Lawrence College) this seminar on Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendor (2015) explores its unusual film semiotics, which not only puts into play compositional elements of visual representation but also directly incorporates thresholds of wakefulness and rhythms of awareness to produce an immersive cinema. The group investigates the aesthetics of lightness and the affective register of humor in this film for what they tell us about the changing conditions of knowledge and experience of art today.

Participants should RSVP to Lawrence Chua lachua@syr.edu for copies of the readings.

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Workshop: The Poetry of Place with Writers Adrian Matejka and Stacey Lynn Brown

Oct 14, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Serious writers and writing teachers, adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, and creative writing MFA students are encouraged to register for this mini-seminar with poets Matejka and Brown, a follow-up to their evening of readings at the YMCA Downtown Writers Center the night prior. 

Advanced registration required. RSVP to pmemmer@syracuseymca.org or 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) by 10/7/16. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Poetry of Place: Readings by Adrian Matejka and Stacey Lynn Brown

Oct 13, 2016, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street, Syracuse

a photo related to the event

National Book Award finalist Adrian Matejka and acclaimed poet Stacey Lynn Brown are two writers for whom place (Matejka’s Indianapolis, Brown’s American South) has served as a crucial influence, affecting the subject matter, texture, and even form of their work. Their reading will be followed by a Q&A and book-signing.

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery: Fall Lecture and Workshop on Language, Culture, and Writing

Oct 13, 2016, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

Falk 275

Algerian/Italian author Amara Lakhous speaks about his relationship with language and culture as evidenced in his award winning fiction.
top
L
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Introduction to the USC Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive: Conducting Research with Audiovisual Testimonies of Genocide Survivors

Oct 10, 2016, 9:00 AM-11:30 AM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

Presented by Emilie Garrigou-Kempton (Center for Advanced Genocide Research, University of Southern California), this gathering serves as an introduction, for researchers and teachers, to the USC Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive database, a repository of over 50,000 video testimonies from survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides. Initially a repository of Holocaust testimony, the VHA has expanded to include testimonies from the Armenian Genocide of World War I, the 1937 Nanjing Massacre in China, the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, and the Guatemalan Genocide of 1978-1996. Collected interviews span 63 countries and 41 languages.

In a vast majority of VHA survivor testimonies, interviewees speak of matters related to “place,” e.g., beloved family homes from which they had to flee or from which they were forcibly removed because of persecution; places of incomprehensible suffering; and places of refuge. The USC Shoah Foundation is “dedicated to making audio-visual interviews with survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides a compelling voice for education and action.” The VHA workshop will familiarize attendees with the database interface and search engine; showcase examples of testimony use in innovative research and teaching by scholars from a wide range of disciplines; and allow attendees to start exploring material relevant to their own research and/or teaching.


Sponsors:
Humanities Center
University Libraries

Co-sponsors:
School of Education - Holocaust & Genocide Education Program
Maxwell School - Department of History, with the Newhouse School, Documentary Film & History
College of Arts & Sciences - Department of Languages, Literature, & Linguistics

top
W

Wooden Stick Festival

Oct 8, 2016, 10:00 AM-4:00 PM

Skä·noñh - Great Law of Peace Center, 6680 Onondaga Lake Pkwy, Liverpool

a photo related to the event

Lacrosse descends from games played by various Native American communities. This festival celebrates its history in Onondaga Nation territory through Haudenosaunee speakers, music, dancing, stickmaking, crafters and food.

NOTE: This was originally scheduled as a two-day event and was publicized as such in our October mailer. While the Skä·noñh Center welcomes visitors all weekend, the festival itself runs Saturday only.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Todd Gray: A Place That Looks Like Home

Oct 7, 2016, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

a photo related to the event

In his exhibition, Todd Gray presents a series of collages that juxtapose images of pop culture, documentary photographs, portrait and visions from the Hubble telescope. His complex layered imagery generates a dialogue about the current state of identity politics, race relations, the African Diaspora and colonialism. In this lecture, Gray discusses his career that spans over 40 years of documentary photography, performance, sculpture and installation. Gray's 6pm lecture will be followed by a reception at 7pm.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Writing Suburban Citizenship: Place-conscious Education and the Conundrum of Suburbia

Oct 6, 2016, 4:30 PM-5:45 PM

Schine Student Center 304 ABC

In this public talk, Robert Brooke (John E. Weaver Professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln) will discuss theories and practices of place-conscious education in relation to suburban geographies.

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Workshop: Designing Place-Conscious Courses

Oct 6, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Prior to his public afternoon lecture, Robert Brooke (John E. Weaver Professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln) presents a small-group workshop to help participants design and coordinate interdisciplinary place-conscious assignments, activities, and projects.

Advanced registration required. RSVP to rverity@syr.edu (315-443-1091) by 9/29/16. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Finding Their Place: Performance by Merasi Musicians

Oct 4, 2016, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Slocum Auditorium

a photo related to the event

The music and traditions of the Merasi, a group of former untouchable Muslim performers, are deeply rooted in place -- the district of Jaisalmer in the Thar desert of Rajasthan, India.  The Merasis have carried on a tradition that they received from thirty-eight generations of musicians who performed for Rajput maharajas and at temple festivals, where Muslim musicians, Hindu devotion, and rich local culture blend with striking results. Merasi performances embody the ecstatic lyrics of their Sufi and Hindu mystic songs. Dr. Sarwar Khan anchors an ensemble of seven to nine virtuoso musicians spanning three generations. 

Click to download the event flier.

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Workshop: Finding Their Place: Social Change and Merasi Identity

Oct 4, 2016, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

341 Eggers

For generations, the Merasi of northwest Rajasthan, India have been scorned as "Manganiyars", meaning beggars. Considered "untouchable", they have been denied access to education, healthcare, and political representation. Traditional folk music is the Merasi's only recognized means of social worth and today despite on-going caste prejudice, they persist in their roles as oral genealogists, storytellers, and musicians. With the assistance of two non-governmental organizations (NGOs), US-based Folk Arts Rajasthan (FAR) and India-based Lok Kala Sagar Sansthan (LKSS) the Merasi envision a tomorrow where they can live in peace and celebrate their heritage with dignity. In this presentation, Merasi performers and NGO staff will discuss the challenges that the Merasi face and how they are working toward social change. 

Advanced registration recommended. RSVP to elbridge@syr.edu by 9/26/16. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Download the workshop flier.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: various screenings

Oct 1, 2016, 1:00 PM-9:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium at Shaffer Art Building

The 14th annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival concludes with a trio of features and a bonus presentation on Saturday, October 1, to feature interaction with filmmakers.

1:00 pm

The Crossing (George Kurian, 2015, Norway, Arabic and English with English subtitles, 55 min )

Following one of the most dangerous journeys of our time with a group of Syrian refugees fleeing war and persecution, this vivid documentary offers an intimate perspective into their harrowing experiences. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with new immigrant students from local high schools.

4:00 pm

Koza (Ivan Ostrochovský, 2015, Slovakia/Czech Republic, 75 min)
Skype Q&A with filmmaker

Watch trailer 

In a subtle fusion of documentary and fiction, Koza follows a young Roma boxer as he embarks on a tragicomic return to the ring in order to pay for his girlfriend's abortion. Ivan Ostrochovský's debut narrative feature casts Peter "Koza" Baláz as "himself," mixing details of Baláz's real life with invented situations to illuminate the grinding poverty and social marginalization experienced by Europe’s Roma communities.

Plus: a sneak-preview of a short film in progress by Lida & Mišo Suchý (2016, USA/Ukraine/Slovakia, closed captioned in English)

7:00 pm

Aligarh (Hansal Mehta, 2015, India, 120 min)
Skype Q&A with filmmaker

Watch trailer 

Based on a true-life story, this groundbreaking feature follows a young journalist in Aligarh as he uncovers a homophobic conspiracy behind the case of an Indian college professor who is caught by the press in bed with his lover.

Plus:

Reluctantly Queer (Akosua Adoma Owusu , 2016, Ghana, 8 min.)
A young Ghanaian man struggles to reconcile his love for his mother with his same-sex desire amid the increased tensions of sexual politics in Ghana.


Download the festival poster or find more info at the official festival website.

Festival Presenters:
Syracuse University Humanities Center (Arts & Sciences)
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: Trick or Treaty?

Sep 30, 2016, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium at Shaffer Art Building

Legendary Canadian and Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin’s inspiring documentary reveals how collective challenges to settler colonialist interpretations of key treaties can bring political empowerment to indigenous communities as they fight for the protection of their lands and their natural resources. Screening features introduction and Q&A with filmmaker.

Trick or Treaty? (Alanis Obomsawin, 2014, Canada, 85 min, closed-captioned in English)

Watch trailer 

Download the festival poster or find more info at the official festival website.


Festival Presenters:
Syracuse University Humanities Center (College of Arts & Sciences)
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

top
W
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Workshop with Filmmaker Trisha Ziff

Sep 30, 2016, 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

The Dressler Room - Room 305 Newhouse 1

Writer, editor, curator and documentary filmmaker Trisha Ziff [The Man Who Saw Too Much, 2015] hosts a small group seminar, during her visit to SU for the Human Rights Film Festival.

Advanced registration required: RSVP to kmnorthr@syr.edu or 315-443-7358 by 9/21/16. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: The Man Who Saw Too Much

Sep 29, 2016, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Winner of two Ariels (Mexican Academy Awards), Trisha Ziff’s enthralling documentary follows Enrique Metinides, who has spent his life documenting death in Mexico City as one of its most renowned and notorious photojournalists. This opening night screening and reception includes an introduction and Q&A with filmmaker.

The Man Who Saw Too Much (Trisha Ziff, Mexico, 2015, 88 min., Spanish and English with English subtitles)

Watch trailer

Download the festival poster or find more info at the official festival website.


Festival Presenters:
Syracuse University Humanities Center (College of Arts & Sciences)
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Atelier 17: A Gathering Place for Avant-Garde Artists [Print Fair]

Sep 25, 2016, 12:00 PM-4:00 PM

SUArt Galleries at Shaffer Art Building

Atelier 17 was a collaborative print center located in Paris that had a major impact on contemporary printmaking.  Organized and operated by Stanley William Hayter, the Atelier was relocated to New York City during World War II where it became a meeting place for European artists escaping persecution by the Nazi regime. These artists had a profound impact on American thinking about the graphic arts and helped usher in the Abstract Expressionist movement.

SUArt's series of events features guest speakers and print sellers Susan Teller Gallery, Dolan Maxwell, The Annex Galleries, The Old Print Shop and Thomas French Fine Art. 

SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSIONS at Shemin Auditorium at Shaffer Art Building:
Friday, September 23, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 24, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
Presenters include:  Domenic Iacono (Director, SUArt Galleries), Joann Moser (Smithsonian Museum), Christina Weyl (Freelance Curator), Andrew Raffery (RISD Professor)

PRINT FAIR HOURS at Shaffer Art Building Galleria:
Friday, September 23, Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 24, Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 25, Noon to 4:00 p.m. 
Presenters include: Susan Teller Gallery (NYC), Annex Galleries (San Jose, CA), Old Print Shop (NYC), Dolan Maxwell (Phila, PA), Thomas French Gallery (Akron,OH)


ONGOING (through May 2017)...

On display in SUArt Galleries' Print and Photo Galleries are two exhibitions that explore the 2016-17 Syracuse Symposium theme of "Place." Wanderlust: Travel Photography from the Syracuse University Art Collection investigates how artists from the late 19th century until today have been captivated by the potential of landscape images and its ability to transport our imagination whether the locale be exotic or not. Curated by exhibition and collection manager Emily Dittman, this display brings together historic albumen prints, travel albums, and contemporary black and white and color images from a variety of photographers working in the photographic medium over the past 120 years.

21 Etchings and Poems, a landmark publication that had a profound impact on contemporary art and culture, will be presented in its entirety in the Print Study Room. Curated by College of Visual and Performing Arts, Museum Studies graduate student Courtney Spencer Eppel, this exhibition presents twenty-one paired artists and authors to create unique works of art. The partnerships for this project included well-known artists and poets Peter Grippe and Dylan Thomas, Willem de Kooning and Harold Rosenberg, Letterio Calapai and William Carlos Williams, and Franz Kine and Frank O’Hara, among others. Many of the artist represented in this portfolio are also represented in the main gallery special exhibition About Prints: The Legacy of Stanley William Hayter and Atelier 17.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Atelier 17: A Gathering Place for Avant-Garde Artists [Symposium and Print Fair]

Sep 24, 2016, 10:00 AM-6:00 PM

SUArt Galleries at Shaffer Art Building

Atelier 17 was a collaborative print center located in Paris that had a major impact on contemporary printmaking.  Organized and operated by Stanley William Hayter, the Atelier was relocated to New York City during World War II where it became a meeting place for European artists escaping persecution by the Nazi regime. These artists had a profound impact on American thinking about the graphic arts and helped usher in the Abstract Expressionist movement. 

EXHIBITION DATES: August 18 through November 20, 2016

SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSIONS at Shemin Auditorium at Shaffer Art Building:
Friday, September 23, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 24, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
Presenters include:  Domenic Iacono (Director, SUArt Galleries), Joann Moser (Smithsonian Museum), Christina Weyl (Freelance Curator), Andrew Raffery (RISD Professor)

PRINT FAIR HOURS at Shaffer Art Building Galleria:
Friday, September 23, Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 24, Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 25, Noon to 4:00 p.m. 
Presenters include: Susan Teller Gallery (NYC), Annex Galleries (San Jose, CA), Old Print Shop (NYC), Dolan Maxwell (Phila, PA), Thomas French Gallery (Akron,OH)


ONGOING (through May 2017)...

On display in SUArt Galleries' Print and Photo Galleries are two exhibitions that explore the 2016-17 Syracuse Symposium theme of "Place." Wanderlust: Travel Photography from the Syracuse University Art Collection investigates how artists from the late 19th century until today have been captivated by the potential of landscape images and its ability to transport our imagination whether the locale be exotic or not. Curated by exhibition and collection manager Emily Dittman, this display brings together historic albumen prints, travel albums, and contemporary black and white and color images from a variety of photographers working in the photographic medium over the past 120 years.

21 Etchings and Poems, a landmark publication that had a profound impact on contemporary art and culture, will be presented in its entirety in the Print Study Room. Curated by College of Visual and Performing Arts, Museum Studies graduate student Courtney Spencer Eppel, this exhibition presents twenty-one paired artists and authors to create unique works of art. The partnerships for this project included well-known artists and poets Peter Grippe and Dylan Thomas, Willem de Kooning and Harold Rosenberg, Letterio Calapai and William Carlos Williams, and Franz Kine and Frank O’Hara, among others. Many of the artist represented in this portfolio are also represented in the main gallery special exhibition About Prints: The Legacy of Stanley William Hayter and Atelier 17.

top
A

Terra Sangue Mare: Sicilian Folk Music and its Roots

Sep 23, 2016, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Setnor Auditorium

Sicilian Folk singer Michaela Musolino and her group, Terra Sangue Mare perform a collection of traditional and contemporary Sicilian folk music with elements of various world music traditions woven throughout the compositions. Narration throughout the concert will help explain and translate the represented experiences, history and culture of Sicily.

top
W

Workshop: Sicilian Folk Music with Terra Sangue Mare

Sep 23, 2016, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Hall of Languages 114

Sicilian Folk singer Michaela Musolino and her group, Terra Sangue Mare present a workshop on Sicilian music and its roots, in which Ms. Musolino teaches dances from Southern Italy and Sicily and explains their origins and history.

Advanced registration required due to space limitations: RSVP to jtsorci@syr.edu by 9/16/16. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Atelier 17: A Gathering Place for Avant-Garde Artists [Symposium and Print Fair]

Sep 23, 2016, 10:00 AM-6:00 PM

SUArt Galleries at Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

Atelier 17 was a collaborative print center located in Paris that had a major impact on contemporary printmaking.  Organized and operated by Stanley William Hayter, the Atelier was relocated to New York City during World War II where it became a meeting place for European artists escaping persecution by the Nazi regime. These artists had a profound impact on American thinking about the graphic arts and helped usher in the Abstract Expressionist movement. 

EXHIBITION DATES: August 18 through November 20, 2016

SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSIONS at Shemin Auditorium at Shaffer Art Building:
Friday, September 23, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 24, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
Presenters include:  Domenic Iacono (Director, SUArt Galleries), Joann Moser (Smithsonian Museum), Christina Weyl (Freelance Curator), Andrew Raffery (RISD Professor)

PRINT FAIR HOURS at Shaffer Art Building Galleria:
Friday, September 23, Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 24, Noon to 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 25, Noon to 4:00 p.m. 
Presenters include: Susan Teller Gallery (NYC), Annex Galleries (San Jose, CA), Old Print Shop (NYC), Dolan Maxwell (Phila, PA), Thomas French Gallery (Akron,OH)


ONGOING (through May 2017)...

On display in SUArt Galleries' Print and Photo Galleries are two exhibitions that explore the 2016-17 Syracuse Symposium theme of "Place." Wanderlust: Travel Photography from the Syracuse University Art Collection investigates how artists from the late 19th century until today have been captivated by the potential of landscape images and its ability to transport our imagination whether the locale be exotic or not. Curated by exhibition and collection manager Emily Dittman, this display brings together historic albumen prints, travel albums, and contemporary black and white and color images from a variety of photographers working in the photographic medium over the past 120 years.


21 Etchings and Poems, a landmark publication that had a profound impact on contemporary art and culture, will be presented in its entirety in the Print Study Room. Curated by College of Visual and Performing Arts, Museum Studies graduate student Courtney Spencer Eppel, this exhibition presents twenty-one paired artists and authors to create unique works of art. The partnerships for this project included well-known artists and poets Peter Grippe and Dylan Thomas, Willem de Kooning and Harold Rosenberg, Letterio Calapai and William Carlos Williams, and Franz Kine and Frank O’Hara, among others. Many of the artist represented in this portfolio are also represented in the main gallery special exhibition About Prints: The Legacy of Stanley William Hayter and Atelier 17.

top
L
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Radical Healing in Schools and Communities, Dr. Shawn Ginwright (San Francisco State University)

Sep 22, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

a photo related to the event

The Douglas P. Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series

This year's series, hosted by the School of Education, begins with Shawn Ginwright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education and African American Studies, who weaves his years of research into touching examples to illustrate how strategy, logic, and plans seldom produce the transformation we seek. Schools, city governments and businesses can adjust their policies and practices but true change only happens when people’s hearts are transformed. Bold and nuanced, Dr. Ginwright’s talk inspires fresh, exciting views on how to transform schools from empty places of learning into hubs for social change.

top
A
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mande Strings - Music and Place around the Black Atlantic

Sep 20, 2016, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Setnor Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Mande Strings consists of three Malian artists, Kokanko Sata Doumbia, Assaba Dramé, and Lamine Soumano, playing guitar, kora, and two types of ngoni stringed instruments —the lute-styled jeli ngoni, and the harp-styled kamelen ngoni. Their performance demonstrates the connection of musical instruments to a Mande sense of place, as well as how aspects of Mande tradition (including techniques like slides, bends, pulls, and hammers) live on across the Black Atlantic in African American musical performance. 

top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

The Chinese Quest for Modernity from the Religious Perspective (LLC2): The Book of Changes: from Confucian Classic to Counterculture Icon

Sep 16, 2016, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Rush Rhees Library, Room 456, University of Rochester

Professor Hon Tze-ki (SUNY Geneso) will discuss how I Ching (The Book of Change), a canonized Confucian classic, was translated into German and English, and eventually became a popular text in the counter-culture movement in the United States in the 1950s. For more information, contact Elya Zhang.
top
Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Jewish Studies (LLC17) Technologies of Memory Series: Concert by Julia Wolfe and Michael Gordon

Sep 15, 2016, 8:00 PM-10:00 PM

Sage Chapel, Cornell University

Composers Julia Wolfe (2015 Pulitzer Prize) and Michael Gordon, co-founders of the renowned NYC-based group, Bang on a Can, team up for a concert of their works that focuses on spirituality and music. Features music for choir, string quartet, amplified rock ensemble, and the premiere of Wolfe’s duo for cello and double bass by John Haines-Eitzen and guest bassist Tomoya Aomori. For information, contact jewishstudies@cornell.edu.
 
Co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program and the Department of Music, and funded in part by a grant from the Cornell Council for the Arts.

top
W

Fulbright Fellowships for Faculty: A Strategic Approach

May 6, 2016, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley

Recently tenured faculty will gain tips and strategies for pursuing support, placing particular emphasis on projects of broad scope and high significance

top
W

Fulbright Fellowships for Faculty: A Strategic Approach

May 5, 2016, 2:30 PM-4:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons(Bird Library)

Understand key factors for developing successful Fulbright proposals, including review panels and their expectations. Suitable for faculty in all fields (Humanities, Social Sciences, Science, Law, Arts, Journalism, Education, Business)

top
W

A First Step in Humanities Competitions: Short-Term Fellowships at Humanities Research Libraries

May 5, 2016, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley

Explore the importance of pursuing short term residencies as a pivotal step in effectively pursuing larger awards and appointments.

top
W

Effective Applications for Humanities Funding & Fellowship:A Substantive Approach

May 4, 2016, 2:30 PM-4:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons(Bird Library)

Alan Rutenberg presents strategies for conceptualizing then crafting compelling, competitive proposals for Humanities funding and fellowships (NEH, ACLS, Guggenheim, Rome Prize)

top
L

CNY Humanities Corridor Seminar: Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellow Paul Arras

Apr 27, 2016, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

304 tolley

Advanced Registration Required

RSVP by April 25 to mmditmar@syr.edu. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

2015-2016 Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellow Paul Arras(History) discusses working with near Westside initiative to produce stories with neighborhood residents. The fellowship is supported in part by Daniel and Joanna Rose and a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

top
W

Barefoot Solutions: A Mini-Seminar. Syracuse Symposium Networks Series

Apr 22, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 tolley

Advanced Registration Required

To get on the waitlist contact:elbridge@maxwell.syr.edu

In this small group session, Bunker Roy delves deeper into the 'Barefoot' solutions that have become agents of change for millions of rural villagers in India. NOTE: this session has filled to capacity.

top
L

Barefoot Solutions: Networking Rural India and a Global Initiative. Syracuse Symposium Networks Series

Apr 21, 2016, 5:30 PM-6:30 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

'Bunker' Roy, founder of internationally acclaimed Barefoot College in India, helps empower rural communities through efficient use of solar energy, water, education, women’s empowerment, and wasteland development. Principal partners for Roy’s visit include the South Asia Centre at Syracuse University, South Asia Program at Cornell University, and SUNY ESF with additional support from SU’s college of Arts and Sciences. School of Architecture, School of Education, Whitman School of Management, WiSE(Women in Science and Engineering), Democratizing Knowledge Project, Renee Crown University Honors Program.
top
A

Humanities Book Signing Reception

Apr 20, 2016, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Faculty and Alumni Center

In what may become an annual signature event, the Humanities Center invites the campus community to celebrate books in the humanities published by SU faculty and staff in 2015.

top
L

Saya Woolfalk: Chimeras, Empaths, and Utopias. VPA Visiting Artist Lecture Series

Apr 14, 2016, 6:00 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum, 401 Harrison Street

Advanced Registration Required

Multimedia artist Saya Woolfalk talks about her fictional utopian universe that blends science fiction, fantasy and cultural anthropology, imagining plant-human hybrids and their society.

top
W

The Pitfalls and Promises of Translation

Apr 8, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 tolley

Advanced Registration Required

RSVP to keverly@syr.edu by March 31. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Participants gain insight into the process of professional translation from English to Spanish through close textual readings from Elizabeth Smart’s novel By grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept, translated by Laura Freixas. Registrants will receive materials before the workshop.

top
L

Implications of Embodied Neuroscience for Understanding of the Self. Contemplative, Collaborative, Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Group, Syracuse Symposium Networks Series

Apr 6, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Kittredge Auditorium at Huntington Beard Crouse(Opening reception at 5 p.m.)

Supported by recent neuroscience studies, Kerr argue for a view of the self that is rooted in multisensory integration and embodied feelings, posing important implications for humanistic scholarship, interdisciplinary inquiry, and understanding of a sense of well-being.

top
L

Brown Girl Dreaming: Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series

Apr 5, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Gifford Auditorium at Huntington Beard Crouse

The school of Education hosts Jacqueline Woodson, celebrated author of Brown Girl Dreaming (2015 Newbury honor) and Miracle Boys(2001 Coretta Scott King Award), who visits SU to share stories about growing up as an African American in the 1960s and ‘70s.

top
L

Women Writers and Autobiography: A Gendered Genre

Apr 5, 2016, 3:30 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons(Bird Library)

Advanced Registration Required

It is generally supposed that women’s literature is prone to using autobiographical material. Are there similar tendencies in other subaltern groups(e.g, African Americans, Latino/as, Jews, gays)? Freixas explores the social and political implications of these ideas.

top
L

Conversation with Writer, Critic, and Feminist Laura Freixas

Apr 4, 2016, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM

202 Hall of Languages

The creative Writing Program hosts this engaging small group conversation with Spanish writer Laura Freixas

top
W

Moving For Social Justice: Putting Your Whole Self In

Apr 1, 2016, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

123 Sims

Attendees should wear comfortable clothes.

Although many of us grew up treating our minds and bodies as separate, they are one entity. This participatory session explores ways (and music) to move our bodies as part of building community, challenging oppression, and creating new vision.

top
A

The First Page: The Importance of Beginning a Novel

Apr 1, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley

Advanced Registration Required

RSVP to keverly@syr.edu by March 24. Include any request for accessibility accommodations.

The first page of a novel is crucial. It needs to grab the reader and present the principal elements of the story. In this workshop, participants qill produce the first page of their novel and move from a vague idea to a concrete beginning.

top
W

Internet, Darknet, Alternet // The Past, Present, and Future of Cooperatively Run Networks

Feb 26, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 tolley

Advanced Registration Required

RSVP to awinkler@syr.edu by February 16, 2016. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Emerson leads the group in imagining what a cooperatively owned/run network might look like.

top
L

Other Networks: Hands-on History in the Media Archaeology Lab (Lori Emerson)

Feb 25, 2016, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons(Bird Library)

Emerson directs the Media Archaeology Lab, a facility providing access to obsolete but functional media from the early 20th century to the 21st century for research and educational purposes.

top
L

Black Lives Matter - Black History Month Commemorative Lecture

Feb 23, 2016, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Garza, co-creator of #BlackLivesMatter, is a writer and community organizer who advocates for black people and queer communities, fights against racial profiling and police violence, and campaigns for improved working conditions for all underserved minority communities.

top
W

Musical Methods for Teaching and Researching Movement in Sport

Feb 22, 2016, 4:00 PM-5:15 PM

304 tolley

Advanced Registration Required

RSVP to drjustic@syr.edu by February 15, 2016. Include any requests for accessibility accomodations.

This participatory workshop explores strategies for understanding kinetic ethnography through social media, video interview, motion captures.

top
L

Players on the Field: Thinking about Musical Humanity through Sport

Feb 22, 2016, 2:15 PM-3:35 PM

Killian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

What can music scholars learn from studying sport? Using ethnography, Dr. Dueck connections to the music- and dance like- social textures in sports.

top
W

Modeling Qualitative Data

Feb 11, 2016, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley

Advanced Registration Required

RSVP to jpwill03@syr.edu by February 4, 2016. Include any request for accessibility accommodations.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own qualitative data(field notes, interviews and texts) to practice techniques for analyzing patterns and claims.

top
L

Three networks walk into a bar...

Feb 10, 2016, 2:15 PM-3:45 PM

Killian Room, Hall of Languages

What is network? in social science research, there are at least three answers to that question...
top
L

Imagining Mattering: Hip Hop Civics Ed, Intersectionality, & Black Joy

Feb 4, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

Dr. Love describes creating a space where black lives matter and students become engaged in the work of fighting for visibility, inclusion and justice.
top
W

For Those Who Cant be Here Today: Prison Mindfulness. Contemplative Collaborative Brown Bag Series

Jan 29, 2016, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

123 Sims Hall

This moderated discussion considers mindfulness as a form of social justice, integrating the spoken words of incarcerated people.

top
W

Public Humanities Fellowships Info Session

Jan 29, 2016, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Tolley Library(301 Tolley)

This informal dialogue highlights the work of current and prior and NYS Public Humanities Fellows and provides guidance for grad students interested in pursuing a 2016-2017 Public Humanities Fellowship before the February 12th application deadline. Light refreshments available.

top