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Curatorial Concerns in Jazz

Feb 24, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholary Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Gerald Veasley (Philadelphia, PA)
Jazmin Ghent (Bartow, FL)
Tanisha Jackson (Community Folk Art Center)
Theo Cateforis (Art and Music Histories)

Veasley, renowned bassist, founder of the Bass Boot Camp, musical host of the Berks Jazz Fest, and curator of the “Unscripted” Jazz Series -- along with fast-rising saxophonist/vocalist/educator Ghent – a Veasley protégé and 2019 NAACP award winner -- reflect on their paths to success in the music industry. All are welcome to this hour of music and dialogue hosted by CNY Jazz Central, facilitated by panelists Jackson and Cateforis.

Music students and spectators are also invited to register for free a master class opportunity offered in the evening, from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Community Folk Art Center (CFAC), 805 E. Genesee Street. Please RSVP by Feb. 21 to Spencer Stultz at 315-442-2230. Include any accessibility requests.


Biographies:

Gerald Veasley, musical polymath, played in West Philly RnB bands in his teens. He entered the international marketplace as bassist for the legendary Joe Zawinul, playing in The Zawinul Syndicate from 1988 to 1995. A successful recording and touring career as leader followed. Among his many musical associations are projects with Odean Pope and Grover Washington, Jr.

The young Jazmin Ghent was voted "2017's Best New Smooth Jazz Artist" and was awarded the prestigious 2019 NAACP Image Award" for Outstanding Jazz Album: The Story of Jaz. Jazmin has three Billboard #1 singles to her credit: "Work Wit It," “Heat” and “Compared to What”. Jazmin has performed at major festivals and venues throughout the country, in Europe, and Australia. In addition to performing, she teaches music in Polk County Florida. Jazmin received a bachelor’s degree (Mus.Ed.) from Florida State University and a Masters degree from Tennessee State University. 


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Religion
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • CNY Jazz Central
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Visibly Hidden: Exploring Queer Masculinities in 1950s Popular Music

Mar 2, 2020, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird

a photo related to the event

Vincent Stephens (Dickinson College)

American audiences of the 1950s regularly consumed gender transgressions in popular media well before they were aware of LGTBQ identities, communities, or politics. “Visibly Hidden” examines how the public personae of four popular male musicians of the era, Johnnie Ray, Little Richard, Johnny Mathis and Liberace, deftly expanded the boundaries of male gender expression before the emergence of queer visibility politics.

Stephens talk draws from his forthcoming 2019 book, Rocking the Closet: How Little Richard, Johnnie Ray, Liberace, and Johnny Mathis Queered Pop Music (University of Illinois Press). Stephens is currently Director of the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Diversity, and a contributing faculty member in the Department of Music, at Dickinson College. He has published widely in the Humanities, on topics ranging from hip hop and gender, and the aesthetics of vocal jazz and pop to the politics of sexual disclosure in popular music. Stephens was also a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Syracuse University (2006–2010).

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Communications and Rhetorical Studies
  • Goldring Arts Journalism
  • LGBTQ Studies
  • Women and Gender Studies
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The Roma Case for Reparations

Mar 3, 2020, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

010 Crouse Hinds Hall

a photo related to the event

Margareta Matache (Harvard University)

The call for reparations as a critical element in healing and accountability for state wrongs has mobilized many constituencies across the globe in the past decades. Drawing from the enslavement of Roma on the territory of Romania and anti-Roma collective injustice, Matache -- hosted by the School of Education -- examines the concept of reparations and focuses on translating theory into possible strategies to heal and repair past and present harm and to prevent future wrongdoing.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Education
  • College of Law Journal of Global Rights & Organizations and Impunity Watch News
  • Lender Center for Social Justice
  • International Relations Program
  • Social Sciences Ph.D. Program
  • Department of History
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Participatory Action Research and the Reclaiming Adolescence Project

Mar 4, 2020, 9:00 AM-10:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Margareta Matache (Harvard University)

Matache leads an informal seminar connected to her talk, The Roma Case for Reparations, for those interested in youth-based participatory action research. Matache presents her work on the Reclaiming Adolescence project, on the educational and career experiences and voices of young Roma.

Please RSVP to Julia White, 443-9321 by Feb. 26 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Education
  • College of Law Journal of Global Rights & Organizations and Impunity Watch News
  • Lender Center for Social Justice
  • International Relations Program
  • Social Sciences Ph.D. Program
  • Department of History
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The Radical Potential of Mothering During the Egyptian Revolution

Mar 4, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

220 Eggers Hall

Nadine Naber (University of Illinois-Chicago)

In celebration of International Women’s Day, Naber -- a leading scholar of Arab and Arab American transnational feminism -- explores the radical potentials of mothering in the context of revolution. Based on ethnographic research with leftist women activists who participated in the Egyptian revolution of 2011, Naber seeks to “unsentimentalize mothering” arguing how it constitutes a practices of resistance to state violence rather than a sentimentalized identity confined to domestic space that supports the nation. Naber is an award-winning author, public speaker and activist on the topics of racial justice; gender justice; women of color feminisms; Arab and Muslim feminisms; Arab Americans; and Muslim Americans. 

Contact Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs for additional information.

Additional supporters:

  • Middle East Studies
  • English
  • Political Science
  • Women's and Gender Studies
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

2126 Mt. Eliott St.: Late American Late Antiquity

Mar 6, 2020, 2:30 PM-4:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

C.M. Chin (UC-Davis)

Historian and artist Catherine Michael Chin's animate-object installation and discussion explores the resonance between contemporary and ancient practices of object animation, re-animation, and remembrance, as forms of embodied knowing that traverse human and nonhuman.

For more information and accommodation requests, contact mvburrus@syr.edu.

This event is organized by the "HS4 Late Antiquity" working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Concert by The American Spiritual Ensemble

Mar 8, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Dr. Everett McCorvey (University of Kentucky)

This performance, featured as part of Hendricks Chapel's "Music and Message" series, includes American Negro Spirituals and music of the Black Experience performed by the American Spiritual Ensemble. Reception follows.

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Mar 9, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Times and locations listed on individual event pages

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency unfolds in two separate one-week visits.

 

"Week 1" [March 9-13] schedule includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception for Professor Winn

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Friday, March 13 - Building Connections: Grad Student Talkback (social hour)

 

"Week 2" [April 6-10] schedule includes:

Monday, April 6 - Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration (interdisciplinary panel featuring Cati de los Ríos, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday 7- Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Lawrence "Torry" Winn, Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research? (discussions led by Winn and TJE colleagues)

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle (dialogue about how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices)


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Welcome Reception for Maisha T. Winn

Mar 9, 2020, 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Community Folk Art Center, 805 E. Genesee Street

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts, and Activism

Meet Winn, this year's Watson Professor, and learn more about the topics she'll address during her mini-residency -- two separate weeks on campus -- March 9-13 and April 6-10.

Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.

ASL provided. Please contact dscole@syr.edu by Feb. 28 with any other accessibility accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mother Music: How African-American Spirituals Shaped American Musical Styles

Mar 10, 2020, 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Everett McCorvey (University of Kentucky)

McCorvey, director of the American Spiritual Ensemble, presents a lecture recital that outlines the history and context of the negro spiritual and focuses on the way in which American musicians adapted the musical forms and melodic content of spirituals to create genres of jazz, blues, and gospel. The lecture includes live musical demonstrations by the American Spiritual Ensemble and excerpts from a PBS documentary that focuses on the group and the spiritual genre.

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Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education

Mar 10, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Watson Theater

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Winn discusses how the Black Arts Movement and Independent Black Institutions (IBIs) cultivated and celebrated Black literate lives. She connects this history to contemporary transformative justice activism in schools and communities. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods

Mar 11, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Winn offers a workshop on equity-oriented, justice-seeking research in the humanities, focusing on listening, storytelling, and acting with and through communities. Space is limited. Please RSVP by Feb. 26 to Kristen Krause and include any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Why Dutch Art Matters Now

Mar 11, 2020, 5:30 PM-6:30 PM

121 Shaffer Art Building

Stephanie Dickey (Queens University)

Dickey presents a public lecture on 17th-century Dutch art and its relevance today, held in connection with the exhibition, “Masterpieces of Seventeenth-Century Dutch Painting from Regional Collection,” currently on view in SUArt Galleries.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lift Every Voice and Sing!

Mar 11, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Setnor Auditorium, Crouse College

The American Spiritual Ensemble performs with the Syracuse University choirs, including University Singers, Hendricks Chapel Choir, Crouse Chorale, and Setnor Sonority.

The American Spiritual Ensemble is a critically-acclaimed professional group composed of some of the finest singers in the classical music world. The vocalists have thrilled audiences around the world with their dynamic renditions of classic spirituals and Broadway numbers. Tenor Dr. Everett McCorvey founded the group in 1995, and many of its members have performed in such venues as the Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, Houston Grand Opera, San Francisco Opera, Boston Opera and the Atlanta Civic Opera. They have also performed abroad in England, Germany, Italy, Japan, Scotland, and Spain.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Mar 12, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Juanita Rivera-Ortiz (YWCA of Syracuse and Onondaga County and Jamesville-Dewitt CSD Boards)
Rob Scott (Cornell Prison Education Program)

Educators and community members join Winn to discuss how restorative justice can help schools effectively address race, class, and gender inequalities. Fifteen copies of Justice on Both Sides will be given to graduate students and community partners at the event. Co-sponsored by the Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Building Connections: The Grad Student Talkback

Mar 13, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

Sainsbury Library, 300 Tolley Humanities Building

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Graduate students are invited to meet with Winn to discuss shared interests over a light breakfast. Please contact Kristen Krause by Feb. 28 with any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Water and Land: Words that Contain Worlds

Mar 25, 2020, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM

341 Eggers Hall

UPDATE: This event was rescheduled from the fall semester.

Luisa Cortesi (Cornell University)

How do people who live in the midst of floods think about water? Informed by multidisciplinary long-term ethnographic fieldwork, this presentation presents ethnographic evidence that, in North Bihar, land and water are though of as in intimate correspondence with each other. By virtue of comparison, then, the ethnographic encounter is held to defy other ontologies of water that see the two substances as in opposition. Since ontologies of natural substances are often “watertight”, mutually exclusive and unable to adapt, this presentation suggests, their encounter may result in semiotic conflict.

For more information, contact Carol Babiracki.

This event was organized by the “LLC23 Social and Cultural Sustainability in South Asia” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Tracing Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape

Mar 26, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Lauret E. Savoy (Mount Holyoke College)

Syracuse Symposium celebrates Syracuse University's Sesquicentennial week with a return by alumna Lauret Savoy (Ph.D. '91). 

Drawing from her prizewinning images, current work on Washington, DC, and Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape, her award-winning volume exploring identity, place, and the unvoiced presence of the past, Savoy discusses how this country’s still unfolding history marks a person, a people, and the land itself. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Indigenous ancestry, she weaves together narratives of migration, displacement, and erasure to counter longstanding and damaging public silences to reveal often-unrecognized ties, such as the siting of the nation’s capital and the economic motives of slavery. None of these links is coincidental. Few appear in public history.

Savoy's lecture is a distinguished feature of the Humanities Center's Syracuse Symposium on "Silence."

(Photo credit: Kris Bergbom)

Additional supporters:

  • Earth Sciences K. Douglas Nelson Lecture Series
  • Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility Offices of the Provost and Chancellor
  • Religion
  • The Graduate School
  • The SOURCE

Bio: Lauret Edith Savoy is the David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies & Geology at Mount Holyoke College as well as a writer, photographer, and pilot. Winner of Mount Holyoke’s Distinguished Teaching Award and an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, she explores the marks of this nation’s history on a people and the land.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Narrating Personal, Familial, and Historical Silences

Mar 27, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Lauret Savoy (Mount Holyoke)

Savoy explores how, to live in this country is to be marked by the land, by the presence of the past, and by selective memory and countless historical silences. Space is limited: RSVP to humcenter@syr.edu by Mar. 20 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

  • Earth Sciences K. Douglas Nelson Lecture Series
  • Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility Offices of the Provost and Chancellor
  • Religion
  • The Graduate School
  • The SOURCE
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Political Listening: The Forensic Turn in Art and Architecture

Mar 27, 2020, 5:15 PM-7:15 PM

214 Slocum Hall Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Ana Naomi deSousa (London, England)

In this screening and talk, filmmaker Ana Naomi de Sousa discusses her experience as a research fellow with Forensic Architecture working on the Saydnaya project, which used "ear-witness" testimony of survivors of Syria’s infamous Saydnaya prison to reconstruct its architecture. The lecture will be accompanied by screenings, including excerpts from Saydnaya and Lawrence Abu Hamdan’s Walled Unwalled

This event is held in conjunction with the exhibition Lawrence Abu Hamdan: Walled Unwalled at Urban Video Project’s architectural projection venue on the north façade of the Everson Museum every Thursday-Saturday from dusk to 11pm February 13 - March 28, 2020.


Biography: Ana Naomi de Sousa is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and writer whose work addresses history, spatial politics and identity. Her documentaries include The Architecture of Violence (2013), Angola - Birth of a Movement (2012), and Hacking Madrid (2015). As a collaborator with Forensic Architecture, she was the filmmaker on the 2016 Saydnaya project. She has written for The Funambulist, The Guardian and Al Jazeera English, among others. Her latest short, about a rainforest conservation project led by women in Ecuador, aired on Al Jazeera English in February 2020 as part of the Women Make Science series. 


Additional supporters:

  • Light Work UVP
  • School of Architecture
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Department of Transmedia
  • SI Newhouse School of Communications | Television, Radio, Film
  • Everson Museum of Art
  • Peter A. Horvitz Endowed Chair in Journalism Innovation
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing Drawing as Meditation

Mar 30, 2020, 10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford C. Grant (Howard University)

In this experiential workshop, Grant provides participants with materials and guidance in carefully seeing the world by drawing what we really see, verses scribing what we know or think we see to encourage reflection, understanding and transformational change. This workshop is ideal for beginners as well as those experienced with sketching and drawing and focuses on the silent process of seeing and knowing rather than the resulting sketch. The workshop aims to provide the participants a way of acknowledging and promoting positive personal and community change.

Please RSVP to Meghan Graham (315-443-2005) by Monday, March 9 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

  • Center for Learning and Student Success
  • Falk College
  • Vice President for the Student Experience, Robert Hradsky
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Diversity Office
  • Student-Athlete Academic Support
  • School of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Contemplative Collaborative

Bio: Bradford C. Grant is a Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, Washington DC. He has been in leadership roles at Hampton and Howard Universities as Chairperson, Director, Associate Dean and Interim Dean. As a registered architect and educator he has extensive experience in community design and contemplative practices in design education. Grant is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), a former board member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), past chair of the Humanities DC and the current board president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

Grant holds a Masters of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and the undergraduate first professional degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing, Drawing, Silence

Mar 30, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford C. Grant (Howard University)

In this public presentation, Grant calls upon his experience as professor of Architecture and former president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society to explore and discuss the way that drawing is not only a visual means of describing and communicating but is also a foundation to seeing the world and oneself as a way of mindfulness and reflection. Seeing the world honestly is far more than just looking at the world. The presentation centers on how Seeing is enhanced by drawing, how Drawing awakens understanding and spikes the imagination of Silence as the sound of seeing. Grant links Seeing, Drawing, Silence to self-awareness, and transformational personal and social change.

Additional supporters:

  • Center for Learning and Student Success
  • Falk College
  • Vice President for the Student Experience, Robert Hradsky
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Diversity Office
  • Student-Athlete Academic Support
  • School of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Contemplative Collaborative

Bio: Bradford C. Grant is a Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, Washington DC. He has been in leadership roles at Hampton and Howard Universities as Chairperson, Director, Associate Dean and Interim Dean. As a registered architect and educator he has extensive experience in community design and contemplative practices in design education. Grant is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), a former board member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), past chair of the Humanities DC and the current board president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

Grant holds a Masters of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and the undergraduate first professional degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA.

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Comedy Night: Stand-Up Spectacular

Apr 3, 2020, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life, 102 Walnut Place

Stephen Rosenfield (American Comedy Institute)

Rosenfield, Founder and Director of the American Comedy Institute in Manhattan, wraps up a series of classroom visits and coaching sessions with an evening of stand-up and sketches, developed with students from Ken Frieden's "Jewish Humor and Satire" course.

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts and Sciences: Jewish Studies Program and Tolley Professorship
  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence

 

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Apr 6, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency unfolds in two separate one-week visits.

 

"Week 1" [March 9-13] schedule includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception for Professor Winn

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Friday, March 13 - Building Connections: Grad Student Talkback (social hour)

 

"Week 2" [April 6-10] schedule includes:

Monday, April 6 - Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration (interdisciplinary panel featuring Cati de los Ríos, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday 7- Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Lawrence "Torry" Winn, Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research? (discussions led by Winn and TJE colleagues)

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle (dialogue about how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices)


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Too Creative for Science

Apr 6, 2020, 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Ahna Skop (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Have you ever wondered what it is like to grow up in a family of artists and then end up a scientist? What does thinking like an artist offer the scientist? Can the blending of art and science encourage a more diverse population of students to pursue science, and improve the public understanding of science? Skop gives us an exciting glimpse into her life and how she has impacted science, education and the public with her two passions: science and art.

Additional supporters:

  • WiSE
  • Department of Biology
  • Norma Slepecky Memorial Lecture
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Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration

Apr 6, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Erika Bullock (UW Madison)
Cati de los Ríos (UC Davis)
Rita Kohli (UC Riverside)
Danny C. Martinez (UC Davis)

What does it mean to teach and learn in an age of mass/hyper-incarceration? Countering how multiply-marginalized students and their families continue to be criminalized, panelists share teaching strategies drawing on transformative justice paradigms across disciplines and stages of education. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

 

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Restorative Justice Community Circles

Apr 7, 2020, 9:00 AM-7:15 PM

(choose from session times and locations below)

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (Co-Founder/Co-Director, Transformative Justice in Education Center, UC Davis)
Vanessa Segundo (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)
Adam D. Musser (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)

Members of the Transformative Justice in Education Center offer workshops introducing communication strategies for restorative justice work and tools for generating critical dialogues about race, class, gender, ability, and privilege.

Two morning sessions offered at 304 Tolley Humanities Building:

  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
  • 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Two afternoon sessions offered at Café Sankofa Cooperative, 2323 South Salina Street:
  • 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • 5:15 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.
Space is limited. Please RSVP by March 24 to Kristen Krause: include your top two time preferences from sessions above, and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research?

Apr 8, 2020, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (Co-Founder/Co-Director, Transformative Justice in Education Center, UC Davis)
Vanessa Segundo (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)
Adam D. Musser (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)

Members of the Transformative Justice in Education Center facilitate roundtable discussions focused on methods and theories for humanizing research. Topics include the California School Discipline Project, the Black Child Legacy Campaign, the Black Parent Survey Project, writing workshops in youth detention centers, and the role of campus student centers. Please contact Kristen Krause by March 25 with any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle

Apr 9, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Marcelle Haddix (Syracuse University)
Carol Fadda (Syracuse University)

Centered on Winn’s Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom, Haddix (Dean's Professor & Department Chair, Reading and Language Arts Center and Co-Director of The Lender Center for Social Justice) and Fadda (Associate Professor, English; Middle Eastern Studies affiliate) join Winn to discuss how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Feminist Methodologies: Dalit Women's Education in Modern India

Apr 13, 2020, 4:00 PM-7:30 PM

319 Sims Hall

A Graduate Student Workshop

Shailaja Paik (University of Cincinnati)

As part of the first Dalit History month event at Syracuse University, Paik presents both a public talk and this workshop for grad students, focusing on epistemological and methodological frameworks that emerge from Ambedkarite and Dalit liberatory discourse.

Grad students, please RSVP by April 6 to Himika Bhattacharya and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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Politics of Performance: Contesting Caste, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Maharashtra (Western India)

Apr 14, 2020, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

Shailaja Paik (University of Cincinnati)

As part of the first Dalit History Month event at Syracuse University, Paik's public lecture focuses on the politics of caste, race, gender and sexuality in India and engages contemporary debates across disciplines in the humanities and the humanistic social sciences. These topics foreground the contributions of Dalit and Transnational Feminist theories on a variety of themes including solidarity practices (within and between Dalit and African American Women), research methods, and the crisis of representation. Paik highlights Dalit feminist thought and histories, as well as drawing connections with interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks such as Transnational Black Feminism and U.S. WOC Feminisms.

Additional supporters:

  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • South Asia Center
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5th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 21, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date for the Humanities Center's growing annual gathering of Syracuse University authors and editors celebrating humanities-related books released in 2019. In this Sesquicentennial year, it is especially fitting to showcase the great writing and research taking place reguarly across our campus!

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Syracuse University Bookstore
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Syracuse University Office of Research
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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Festival

Apr 22, 2020, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Life Sciences Atrium / CST

This 3-day event highlights the diversity and strength of research conducted by undergraduates in the humanities and STEM disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Between April 22-24, students will share their work through poster sessions in the Life Sciences Atrium and brief presentations in CST classrooms.

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit and provide questions and feedback.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala on display

Apr 23, 2020, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 23rd and with a closing ceremony at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Architecture
  • SU Art Galleries
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Begins

Apr 23, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 23rd, with observation through the week and a closing event at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Architecture
  • SU Art Galleries
  • Moynihan South Asia Centeron
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Festival

Apr 23, 2020, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Life Sciences Atrium / CST

This 3-day event highlights the diversity and strength of research conducted by undergraduates in the humanities and STEM disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Between April 22-24, students will share their work through poster sessions in the Life Sciences Atrium and brief presentations in CST classrooms.

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit and provide questions and feedback.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Muslim Spaces, Jewish Pasts: Genealogies of the Split Arab / Jew Figure

Apr 23, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Ella Shohat (New York University)

Shohat argues that the question of the Arab-Jew must be posed in order to address the complex imaginaries of both “the Arab” and “the Jew,” which in contrast to present-day nationalist common sense, must be rearticulated as mutually constitutive categories. Event includes reception and audience Q&A.

Shohat's talk is co-presented by the Ray Smith Symposium in the College of Arts & Sciences.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

HNY Public Humanities Fellows Presentations

Apr 24, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Myriam Lacroix (MFA Student in Creative Writing)
Alanna Louise Warner-Smith (PhD Student in Anthropology)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss their experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects. Additional details will be posted soon!

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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Festival

Apr 24, 2020, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Life Sciences Atrium / CST

This 3-day event highlights the diversity and strength of research conducted by undergraduates in the humanities and STEM disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Between April 22-24, students will share their work through poster sessions in the Life Sciences Atrium and brief presentations in CST classrooms.

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit and provide questions and feedback.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Ends

Apr 29, 2020, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

First opening at 10 a.m. on April 23 and observable throughout the week, a closing event takes place at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Architecture
  • SU Art Galleries
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
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