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Upcoming Events

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Queer Terror: Refusing Settler Empire and the 'Value of Life'

Oct 22, 2019, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

Heike Schotten (University of Massachusetts-Boston)

Schotten’s lecture draws on her new book, Queer Terror: Life, Death, and Desire in the Settler Colony (Columbia UP, 2018) which mobilizes queer theory and critical indigenous theory to re-think biopolitics in Nietzschean service to challenging the hidden moralisms of “terrorism” discourse, Islamophobia, and US Empire.

View or download the event flier.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • LGBT Studies
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Transatlantic Abstraction

Oct 23, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library

Megan Sullivan (University of Chicago)
Amy Chun Kim (Cornell University)

In this panel discussion on the trajectories of abstract art, two emerging scholars present papers: one  focuses on the work of the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian, perhaps the most significant abstract painter in Europe before WWII, who ended his career in the U.S. A second paper focuses on the Spanish-Uruguayan artist Joaquin Torres-Garcia, who was active in Europe and Montevideo until his death in 1949.

Please RSVP to Sam Johnson by Oct. 15.


This event is organized by the VAC23 “Modernist Geographies” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Perspectives: Centers, Margins, Boundaries

Oct 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM

Falk 275

This one-day symposium explores the complex relationships between centers and peripheral spaces, as well as boundaries and borders that define our world and how they are represented in literatures and the visual arts. Invited speakers include Burcu Dogramaci, Elizabeth Otto, and Bertrand Westphal.

View or download the event schedule here.

This event is funded in part by a CUSE grant from the Syracuse University Office of Research, and co-sponsored by CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • English and Textual Studies
  • Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
  • Center for European Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

'Cripping' Graphic Medicine: Psychiatric Disability, 'Crip' Culture, and the Health Humanities

Oct 29, 2019, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Elizabeth J. Donaldson (NYIT)

Today, graphic memoirs are both popular and acclaimed: for example, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home (2006) is taught in college courses and has been adapted into an award-winning Broadway musical. Yet, when Justin Green published his 40-page autobiographical comic, Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary in 1972, he was breaking new ground and inventing a new form. By reading Binky Brown as a disability memoir, Donaldson argues that psychiatric disability and the empathetic treatment of mental health issues are foundational to this genre. Contemporary graphic memoirs of psychiatric disability are both a legacy of Green’s innovative confessional comics and an extension of his work. For students of disability studies, these graphic texts challenge stereotypes of mental illness and offer important and unique insights into the experiences of people living with madness and psychiatric disability.

This Syracuse Symposium event addresses issues of power in the silencing of disability and the “voices” of those who experience barriers in healthcare and healthcare education and practice. The event also addresses how disabled people’s “voices” are sometimes silenced in Graphic Medicine, the comics industry, and beyond, thus demonstrating why adaptations are necessary to (re)fashion a primarily visual medium so that it is consistently accessible to a spectrum of creators and audiences.

Additional supporters:


Biography: Elizabeth J. Donaldson, who teaches courses in bioethics and American literature and directs a minor in Medical Humanities, draws lines between Graphic Medicine, Disability Studies, and Health Humanities, focused on psychiatric disability.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Drawing Out the Public Sphere: A Workshop on 'Cripping' Graphic Medicine

Oct 30, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Elizabeth J. Donaldson (NYIT)

Using specific examples from a short comic in Daryl Cunningham's Psychiatric Tales, this workshop examines themes of violence alongside representations of mental illness in the larger culture, in order to discuss how comics can amplify or combat stigma.

This Syracuse Symposium workshop addresses issues of power in the silencing of disability and the “voices” of those who experience barriers in healthcare and healthcare education and practice. The session will also explore how disabled people’s “voices” are sometimes silenced in Graphic Medicine, the comics industry, and beyond, thus demonstrating why adaptations are necessary to (re)fashion a primarily visual medium so that it is consistently accessible to a spectrum of creators and audiences.

Space is limited; please RSVP by 10/23 to Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri, 315-443-2156. Include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:


Biography: Elizabeth J. Donaldson, who teaches courses in bioethics and American literature and directs a minor in Medical Humanities, draws lines between Graphic Medicine, Disability Studies, and Health Humanities, focused on psychiatric disability.

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Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework

Oct 30, 2019, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

Kia Melchor Hall (Fielding University)

Situated at the intersection of IR and Black feminist theory and praxis, Hall argues that a Black feminist tradition of engaging the international exists, has been neglected by mainstream IR and can be written into the IR canon using the TBF framework. Using grounded theory research within the Black indigenous Garifuna community of Honduras, as well as the scholarship of Black feminist anthropologists, the Hall focuses on five TBF guiding principles—intersectionality, solidarity, scholar-activism, attention to borders/boundaries, and radically transparent author positionality, offering an Interdisciplinary, critical alternative for engaging IR studies.  Hall’s work is profoundly interdisciplinary, bringing the social sciences (IR) into conversation with the deeply humanistic trajectory of Black feminist theory and politics.

Biography: With academic credentials in both computational and social sciences, K. Melchor Quick Hall, Ph.D. is a transdisciplinary scholar-activist. Her dissertation research explored the importance of cassava bread, or "ereba" in the Garifuna language, which is central to development in Honduras’ rural, Black indigenous Garifuna community. Highlighting the importance of Black women’s work in community development is an important aspect of Dr. Hall's socio-political commitments. In addition to working with rural farmers in Honduras, she also works in solidarity with food activists in the US, such as those at Soul Fire Farm, and understands how important science is to Black and indigenous livelihoods. Having taught and trained in various STEM disciplines, including mathematics, computer science, and environmental science, Dr. Hall is committed to increased access and opportunities for historically under-represented populations, including Black and Latino populations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Speaking Truths Unspoken: New Directions and New Voices in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

Nov 1, 2019, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Yessica Garcia Hernandez (University of California, San Diego)
Allan Lumba (Virginia Tech)
Shanae Aurora Martinez (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee)
Regina Mills (Texas A&M University)

In an engaging examination of the power of breaking through historical, institutional, and cultural modes of silencing, scholars in African American, Asian American, Latinx and Native American studies talk about their areas of research and the current issues animating critical race and ethnic studies.

This moderated roundtable discussion is jointly supported by the College of Arts & Sciences Ray Smith Symposium and the Syracuse Symposium.

Additional supporters:

  • Campbell Public Affairs Institute
  • Department of English
  • Department of History
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • The LGBT Resource Center
  • Maxwell African Scholars Union
  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Transmedia Historical and Architectural Reconstructions: Forensic Traces of Apartheid-Era Human Rights Violations in Soweto

Nov 5, 2019, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Slocum Auditorium

Angel David Nieves (San Diego State Unversity)

Over the past two decades, scholars and community leaders have experimented with the use of new digital technologies to tell the complex histories of the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. Technologies now at our disposal allow us to layer victim testimony using online platforms and multiple tools for mapping, text mining, and 3D visualizations. Architectural reconstructions of sites where apartheid-era crimes occurred can now be used to document more complex histories of the liberation movement. As a field, digital humanities (DH) can also help analyze new forms of documentation so as to reconstruct and recover an alternative historical narrative in the face of conventional wisdom or officializing histories for the foreign tourist market. Nieves' lecture looks at the ways scholars and community leaders in South Africa have used new digital technologies to tell the complex histories of the anti-apartheid movement.

This event is organized by the HS3 “Urban Humanities” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Julieta tiene la culpa: Women, Guilt, Empowerment, and Performance

Nov 6, 2019, 12:45 PM-3:35 PM

Eggers (see below)

Bárbara Colio (Voces Teatrales)

12:45 – 2:00 p.m. in Eggers 113
  2:15 – 3:35 p.m. in Eggers 341

Mexican playwright, Bárbara Colio, uses Mexico as a case study to discuss the active role of women in theater and to address some of the challenges women face in the arts. Colio discusses and reads scenes from her recent play Julieta tiene la culpa (It’s Juliet’s Fault), a piece intertwining references from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire.

Colio's classroom talks are open to anyone interested. For further information, contact Marie O’Leary.


This event is organized by the LLC12 “Lake Erie Latin American Cultural Studies (LELACS)” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Water and Land: Words that Contain Worlds

Nov 7, 2019, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

341 Eggers

Luisa Cortesi (Cornell University)

How do people who live in the midst of floods think about water? Informed by multidisciplinary long-term ethnographic fieldwork, this presentation presents ethnographic evidence that in North Bihar, India, land and water are thought of as in intimate correspondence with each other. By virtue of comparison, then, the ethnographic encounter is held to defy other ontologies of water that see the two substances as in opposition. Since ontologies of natural substances are often “watertight”, mutually exclusive and unable to adapt, this presentation suggests, their encounter may result in semiotic conflict.

This event is organized by the “LLC23 Social and Cultural Sustainability in South Asia” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Grief, Healing, and Creative Possibilities

Nov 8, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Holly Greenberg (Syracuse University VPA)
DJ Hellerman (Everson Museum of Art) 
Brian Konkol (Syracuse University Hendricks Chapel) 
Mary Murray (Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute)

Presented in correlation with the fall 2019 exhibition, Not A Metric Matters, this moderated panel discussion brings together contemporary printmaker and CVPA faculty member Greenberg, curator Hellerman, Hendricks Chapel Dean Konkol, and Murray, art historian, to discuss the isolating and often silent aspects of death, grief, and remembrance. Using Greenberg’s current artwork commemorating her late husband as a starting point to discuss the process of healing, we'll explore the reality of life’s transience and the creative possibilities for commemorating an individual human’s life.

Additional supporters:

  • Hendricks Chapel
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TitBits: Breast Cancer Stories [REVISED DATES!]

Nov 9, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Documentary theater dramatizes the stories behind breast cancer—patient, survivor, caregiver, medical practitioner, and advocate.

Choose from two performances:

  • Saturday, November 9, 7-9 p.m.
  • Sunday, November 10, 2-4 p.m.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TitBits: Breast Cancer Stories [REVISED DATES!]

Nov 10, 2019, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Documentary theater dramatizes the stories behind breast cancer—patient, survivor, caregiver, medical practitioner, and advocate.

Choose from two performances:

  • Saturday, November 9, 7-9 p.m.
  • Sunday, November 10, 2-4 p.m.
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Gandhi in the Gallery: The Art of Disobedience

Nov 13, 2019, 2:15 PM-3:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Sumathi Ramaswamy (Duke University)

Mohandas K. Gandhi has been described as “an artist of non-violence,” crafting a set of practices of the self and politics that earned him the mantle of Mahātma, “the great soul.” There is an enormous body of scholarship that has explored and critiqued Gandhi’s philosophy and praxis of satyāgraha, non-violent civil disobedience. Yet what does it mean to think of satyāgraha as an aesthetic regime, and its principal exponent as the paradigmatic artist of disobedience?

In this presentation, prof Ramaswamy sets out to answer these questions with the help of India’s modern artists who have turned to the Mahātma as their muse over the past century, but especially in recent decades.

Additional supporters:

  • South Asia Center
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Department of History
  • Department of Photography
  • Department of Magazine, News and Digital Journalism
  • Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Light Work
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Gandhi in the Gallery: Mini-seminar with Sumathi Ramaswamy

Nov 15, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Lemke Room, Bird Library

Sumathi Ramaswamy (Duke University)

Following a public lecture earlier in the week, Ramaswamy conducts a mini-seminar in the Special Collections Research Center of Bird Library.

Focusing on an iconic set of photographs of Mohandas K. Gandhi taken by the American photographer Margaret Bourke-White when she visited India in the 1940s, this mini-seminar considers the role played by the camera in creating and consolidating an image of Gandhi as Mahatma.  In addition, Ramaswamy explores how iconic photographs (such as Bourke-White’s) have an afterlife in the work of the contemporary artist of India who turns to them as productive resource but also as problematic inheritance and provocative incitement.

RSVP to Emera Bridger by November 5. Include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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An Evening of Performance by ALOK

Nov 18, 2019, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Alok Vaid-Menon

ALOK Vaid-Menon is a gender non-conforming writer, performance artist, and educator, with an eclectic style and poetic that challenges the gender binary itself. In honor of Trans Day of Remembrance, ALOK will explore through poetry, stand-up comedy, drag, and more the issues that affect the queer and trans community as well as fashion, aesthetics, and trauma. A Q&A will follow the performance.

Additional supporters:

  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • School of Education
  • Goldring Arts Journalism Program
  • School of Design/Fashion Design
  • South Asia Center
  • Newhouse School of Public Communication
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

What You Have Heard Is True: A Reading by Carolyn Forché

Dec 5, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street, Syracuse

a photo related to the event

Carolyn Forché (Chapman University)

Acclaimed poet Carolyn Forché’s body of work is centered on the poetry of witness, bringing to light the unseen, crucial, and often terrifying stories of our times. Her reading focuses on poems that illustrate how poetry can give voice to those who have been silenced, as well as on her new memoir, What You Have Heard is True. Q&A and book-signing follow.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Against Silence: The Vital Work of Telling

Dec 6, 2019, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Carolyn Forché (Chapman University)

In this craft discussion moderated by poet and YMCA Downtown Writers Center director Philip Memmer, Forché will focus on the vital role poetry can play in giving voice to those who have been silenced, and in ensuring that suppressed stories can be made heard.

Space is limited for this event. Please RSVP to Phil Memmer by Nov. 27. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Graphic Medicine: Can Comics Improve Our Health?

Jan 23, 2020, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

New Academic Building 4414BC (Accessible through Weiskotten Hall) SUNY Upstate Medical University

MK Czerwiec (Nurse and comic creator)

Learn how the growing field of graphic medicine can benefit all involved in health/care, whether in the clinic, the classroom, or the community.

Additional supporters:

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Info Session: Applying for New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellowships for 2020-21

Jan 24, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Interested students are welcome to attent this information session in prepreparation for the next call for applicants for the 2020-21 Public Humanities Graduate Fellowship program, a shared initiative of the Humanities Center and the CNY Humanities Corridor, in partnership with Humanities New York.

At this jointly-hosted information session, current and former fellows will talk about the fellowship and answer questions. Light breakfast available.

Download the event flier for additional information.

More about the fellowships:

At Syracuse University, the program is open to graduate students pursuing a PhD in Anthropology, Composition & Cultural Rhetoric, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Cultural Foundations of Education, or Literacy in Education. It is also open to graduate students pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing or in VPA (3-year MFA programs only).

Each year, Syracuse University is granted two fellowships. Learn more about our current and prior fellows.

Application links are at the HNY website.​

Early/additional questions? Contact Humanities New York Program Officer Adam Capitanio, 212-233-1131.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Cultivating Care: A Graphic Medicine Workshop

Jan 24, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Setnor Hall 3509/10 (Accessible through Weiskotten Hall) SUNY Upstate Medical University

MK Czerwiec (Nurse and comic creator)

Engage with graphic medicine exercises to explore creative, reflective, and inclusive practices for care of self and others. RSVP by 1/17 to Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri, 315-443-2156. Include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Intertwined Journeys

Jan 24, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Community Folk Art Center, 805 E. Genesee Street

Amed Badr (Wesleyan University)

This exhibit showcases an ongoing collaboration between Narratio, a global platform for the creative expression of refugee youth; the Northside Learning Center; Syracuse University; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This official reception features a public talk from writer and founder of Narratio, Ahmed Badr, and readings of original poetry by resettled refugee writers from across the world.

Exhibit runs January 20-31, during CFAC hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (extended hours during evening programs)

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

When I has my likeness took: Black Subjects and the Modernization of Photography

Jan 30, 2020, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Slocum Auditorium

Joan Bryant (African American Studies)

What did it mean to be a modern black photographic subject in images produced by white photographers?

Bryant's talk explores issues in the SUArt exhibition, Black Subjects in Modern Media Photography: Photographs from the George R. Rinhart Collection. It analyzes how white photographers presented people and practices as black subjects while the medium was becoming increasingly modern in the first half of the twentieth century.  It reflects on the silences regarding black people’s efforts to assert identities through mechanisms they did not control. Finally, it maps how photographers, their subjects, and viewers negotiated and contested diverse meanings of blackness. 

A reception follows the talk.

Additional supporters:

  • SUART Galleries
  • African American Studies Department 
  • Newhouse  
  • Community Folk Art Center (CFAC)
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Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows Presentations

Jan 31, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Haejoo Kim (Ph.D. candidate, English)
Aley O'Mara (Ph.D. candidate, English)

Enjoy coffee and light breakfast as you hear more about the research of the Humanities Center's 2019-2020 Dissertation Fellows, Kim and O'Mara. Additional information coming soon.  Contact The Humanities Center to request any accessibility accommodations.

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Decentering Citizenship

Feb 18, 2020, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

060 Eggers

Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto)

Choo talks about her book, Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea, which explores the struggle for belonging among three groups of Filipina migrants: factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and hostesses in American military clubs.

Additional supporters:

  • Asian/Asian American Studies Program
  • Geography
  • Political Science
  • Sociology Graduate Student Association
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Perfect Victim: Why American Culture Prefers Dead (White) Girls

Feb 18, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Alice Bolin (Author)

Pop culture writer, Bolin, talks about her book, Dead Girls: Surviving an American Obsession.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Black Music and Black Power in the Era of #BlackLivesMatter

Feb 19, 2020, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Mark Lomax (Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH)

2015 was a landmark year for hip-hop artists Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole who made headlines by making clear artistic statements aligning them with the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Despite the success seen by both artists, it seems that the majority of well-known African American musicians have been reluctant to make similar statements which is a stark departure from the traditional role Black music has played in past movements.

 

After a brief overview of how music was used by Blacks in America as a means of resistance, Lomax addresses the possible socio-cultural and political implications of using Black music as an expression of positive Black cultural identity and Black power in the age of #BlackLivesMatter.


Bio: Dr. Mark Lomax, II, critically acclaimed composer, recording artist, drummer, activist, and educator is a Wexner Center for the Arts at the Ohio State University Artist Residency 2018 Award recipient. A highly sought-after lecturer, Lomax specializes in the socio-political, and spiritual aspects of African-American art, music, race, and the usage of the arts to build community. Besides performing with gospel choirs around the country, Lomax also boasts impressive jazz credentials. He has toured with the Delfeayo Marsalis Sextet and worked with notable artists such as Clark Terry, Marlon Jordan, Azar Lawrence, Bennie Maupin, Billy Harper, Nicholas Payton, Ellis Marsalis, and Wessel Anderson, among others.

 

Lomax holds a Doctor of Music Arts degree in composition from The Ohio State University. In January 2019, Lomax released 400: An Afrikan Epic, a composition that ambitiously tells the story of the Afrikan diaspora over the course of a 12 album cycle.  

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Black Composer as Jali: Composition, Improvisation, and the Afrikan Epic

Feb 20, 2020, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM

CFAC Gallery, 805 Genesee Street

Mark Lomax (Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH)

In the West Afrikan storytelling tradition, the Jali serve as the professional musicians tasked with preserving the history, rituals, and experiences of the culture in which they were born. These keepers of the culture tell the stories of their people through songs that seamlessly incorporate pre-composed material with improvised sections to create epic narratives that remind the listener who they are, where they have been, and point to the future. This tradition survived the Middle Passage, evolved through the savagery of slavery, and now manifests itself in the work of many contemporary Black American composers.

Using examples from his work, 400: An Afrikan Epic, Lomax discusses the process by which he worked with composition and improvisation to create aspects of his epic which honors the West Afrikan tradition and is inspired by the work of Duke Ellington, Renee Baker, Anthony Davis, and Wadada Leo Smith.


Bio: Dr. Mark Lomax, II, critically acclaimed composer, recording artist, drummer, activist, and educator is a Wexner Center for the Arts at the Ohio State University Artist Residency 2018 Award recipient. A highly sought-after lecturer, Lomax specializes in the socio-political, and spiritual aspects of African-American art, music, race, and the usage of the arts to build community. Besides performing with gospel choirs around the country, Lomax also boasts impressive jazz credentials. He has toured with the Delfeayo Marsalis Sextet and worked with notable artists such as Clark Terry, Marlon Jordan, Azar Lawrence, Bennie Maupin, Billy Harper, Nicholas Payton, Ellis Marsalis, and Wessel Anderson, among others.

 

Lomax holds a Doctor of Music Arts degree in composition from The Ohio State University. In January 2019, Lomax released 400: An Afrikan Epic, a composition that ambitiously tells the story of the Afrikan diaspora over the course of a 12 album cycle.  

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Cultural Connections: Curatorial Concerns in Jazz

Feb 24, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholary Commons, 114 Bird Library

Gerald Veasley (bassist)
Jazmin Ghent (saxophonist)

Veasley, renowned bassist, founder of the Bass Boot Camp, musical host of the Berks Jazz Fest, and curator of the “Unscripted” Jazz Series -- along with fast-rising saxophonist/vocalist/educator Ghent – a Veasley protégé and 2019 NAACP award winner -- reflect on their paths to success in the music industry. All are welcome to this hour of music and dialogue hosted by CNY Jazz Central.

Music students and spectators are also invited to register for free a master class opportunity offered in the evening, from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Community Folk Art Center (CFAC), 805 E. Genesee Street. Please RSVP to Spencer Stultz at 315-442-2230. Include any accessibility requests.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Visibly Hidden: Exploring Queer Masculinities in 1950s Popular Music

Mar 2, 2020, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird

Vincent Stephens (Dickinson College)

American audiences of the 1950s regularly consumed gender transgressions in popular media well before they were aware of LGTBQ identities, communities, or politics. “Visibly Hidden” examines how the public personae of four popular male musicians of the era, Johnnie Ray, Little Richard, Johnny Mathis and Liberace, deftly expanded the boundaries of male gender expression before the emergence of queer visibility politics.

Stephens talk draws from his forthcoming 2019 book, Rocking the Closet: How Little Richard, Johnnie Ray, Liberace, and Johnny Mathis Queered Pop Music (University of Illinois Press). Stephens is currently Director of the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Diversity, and a contributing faculty member in the Department of Music, at Dickinson College. He has published widely in the Humanities, on topics ranging from hip hop and gender, and the aesthetics of vocal jazz and pop to the politics of sexual disclosure in popular music. Stephens was also a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Syracuse University (2006–2010).

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Goldring Arts Journalism
  • Women and Gender Studies
  • LGBT Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Concert by The American Spiritual Ensemble

Mar 8, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Dr. Everett McCorvey (Director)

This performance, featured as part of Hendrick Chapel's "Music and Message" series, includes American Negro Spirituals and music of the Black Experience. Reception to follow.

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Mar 9, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency will be broken into two separate one-week visits.

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 1" [March 9-13] includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception at the Goldstein Alumni & Visitors Center

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing:Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry and Interpretive Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 2" [April 6-10] includes:

Monday, April 6 - Toward Transformative Justice in Education (panel with an interdisciplinary research collective consisting of Cati de los Rios, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday, April 7 and 8 - Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Transformative Justice Research Roundtable

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom Book Circle

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mother Music: The African-American Spiritual & Its Role in Shaping American Musical Styles

Mar 10, 2020, 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Everett McCorvey (Director)

Lecture and recital conducted by McCorvey and the American Spiritual Ensemble.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lift Every Voice and Sing!

Mar 11, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Setnor Auditorium, Crouse College

Setnor School of Music choral ensembles join The American Spiritual Ensemble in concert.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Tracing Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape

Mar 26, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Lauret Savoy (Mount Holyoke)

Syracuse Symposium celebrates Syracuse University's Sesquecentennial week with a return by almnus Lauret Savoy (Ph.D. '91), a renowned writer of both Native American and African American descent. 

Drawing from her prizewinning images, current work on Washington, DC, and Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape, her award-winning volume exploring identity, place, and the unvoiced presence of the past, Savoy discusses how this country’s still unfolding history marks a person, a people, and the land itself. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Indigenous ancestry, she weaves together narratives of migration, displacement, and erasure to counter longstanding and damaging public silences to reveal often-unrecognized ties, such as the siting of the nation’s capital and the economic motives of slavery. None of these links is coincidental. Few appear in public history.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Political Listening: the Forensic Acoustics of Lawrence Abu Hamdan

Mar 27, 2020, 5:15 PM-7:30 PM

Slocum Auditorium

Lawrence Abu Hamdan (University of London)

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, artist and audio investigator for the renowned Forensic Architecture agency at Goldsmiths College, screens recent work and delivers a talk exploring acoustics - and silence - as a political dimension.

Additional supporters:

  • Light Work UVP
  • School of Architecture
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts Department of Transmedia
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing, Drawing as Meditation

Mar 30, 2020, 10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford Grant (Howard University)

Prior to his public talk later in the afternoon, Grant meets with registrants to explore how silent contemplation can be a powerful tool for social justice. 

Please RSVP to Meghan Graham (315-443-2005) by Monday, March 9 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing, Drawing, Silence

Mar 30, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford Grant (Howard University)

Silent contemplation can be a powerful tool for social justice. Dr. Grant’s research and teaching connect personal insights gained through meditative drawing with political action in creating spaces premised on universal design. His talk reflects on the meaning of seeing and its practical and political manifestations in design.

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Apr 6, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency will be broken into two separate one-week visits.

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 1" [March 9-13] includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception at the Goldstein Alumni & Visitors Center

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing:Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry and Interpretive Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Boath Sides Book Circle

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 2" [April 6-10] includes:

Monday, April 6 - Toward Transformative Justice in Education (panel with an interdisciplinary research collective consisting of Cati de los Rios, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday, April 7 and 8 - Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Transformative Justice Research Roundtable

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom Book Circle

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5th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 21, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date for this growing annual gathering of Syracuse University authors and editors celebrating humanities-related books released in 2019!  Check back as event details develop.

Meanwhile, if you or a fellow Syracuse University faculty/staff member or student published a book, copyright 2019, that contributes to the humanities broadly conceived, please tell us about it in the Books in the Humanities Survey on the FORMS page of our website. Survey closes December 13, 2019.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala on display

Apr 22, 2020, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, April 22nd and with a closing ceremony at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
  • SU Art Galleries
  • School of Architecture
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Begins

Apr 22, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, April 22nd, with observation through the week and a closing event at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
  • SU Art Galleries
  • School of Architecture
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Muslim Spaces, Jewish Pasts: Genealogies of the Split Arab / Jew Figure

Apr 23, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

T.B.D.

Ella Shohat (New York University)

Shohat argues that the question of the Arab-Jew must be posed in order to address the complex imaginaries of both “the Arab” and “the Jew,” which in contrast to present-day nationalist common sense, must be rearticulated as mutually constitutive categories. Event includes reception and audience Q&A.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Ends

Apr 29, 2020, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

First opening at 10 a.m. on April 22 and observable throughout the week, a closing event takes place at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
  • SU Art Galleries
  • School of Architecture
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
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