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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Now More Than Ever: The Political Urgency of Community Archives

Apr 23, 2019, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Michelle Caswell (University of California, Los Angeles)
Samip Mallick (South Asian American Digital Archive)

Stories have the powerful ability not only to chronicle the histories of communities, but also to enable the cyclical nature of privilege and systemic oppression by the dominant cultures who disseminate them. In this talk, Caswell and Mallick -- co-founders of the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) -- explore how members of communities marginalized by white supremacy and heteropatriarchy imagine archives as potential sites of disruption of these oppressive cycles.

Caswell and Mallick argue that archivists make more liberatory interventions in disrupting white supremacy and patriarchy in archival practice, going beyond the standard solutions of diverse collecting and inclusive description. In so doing, they will explore emerging examples from their own pedagogical and archival practices to illustrate possibilities for archival disruption, and galvanize archivists to embrace activism during times of
political and social crisis.


Additional supporters:

  • School of Information Studies
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Department of History at the Maxwell School
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • South Asia Center
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC)
  • Eastern New York Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ENY/ACRL)
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame

Apr 23, 2019, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Cary Wolfe (Rice University)

Wolfe conducts a visiting seminar as a guest of Professor Gregg Lambert’s philosophy course on Critique of European Humanism. Wolfe discusses his work in animal studies and his book entitled, Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame. Interested faculty and students are welcome to attend.

Contact Aimee Germain for any additional information.

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Digital Humanities Student Research Symposium

Apr 24, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

This event provides a forum for undergraduate and graduate students across the Corridor -- and across a wide range of disciplines -- to share their work in the digital humanities. This mini-conference recognizes students' research in their respective fields, and highlights faculty who are creating cutting-edge assignments in their courses.

Click to view or download the event flier.

For information, please contact Sarah Fuchs.


This event is coordinated by the Digital Humanities in Practice (DH9) working group, sponsored by the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the College of Arts & Sciences.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

How to Tell Your Community's Story

Apr 24, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Michelle Caswell (University of California, Los Angeles)
Samip Mallick (South Asian American Digital Archive)

In follow up to their public lecture, SAADA co-founders Mallick and Caswell host an interactive workshop to guide participants through the process of starting and building community archives, sharing stories about what worked and what didn't. Topics include how to get started, developing a collection focus, building relationships with donors, fundraising, and more.

RSVP by April 17 to Tarida Anantachai; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Additional supporters:

  • School of Information Studies
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Department of History at the Maxwell School
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • South Asia Center
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC)
  • Eastern New York Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ENY/ACRL)
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From Boccaccio to Pico, and Garibaldi: The Virtual Humanities Lab at Brown University

Apr 24, 2019, 12:45 PM-2:30 PM

Spector Room, 608 Bird Library

Massimo Riva (Brown University)

Riva discusses an important digital humanities project developed at The Virtual Humanities Lab (VHL) at Brown University, created in 2004 from a two-year grant from the NEH. Since its inception, Massimo has coordinated this international endeavor with contributions from scholars across the U.S., Europe, Latin America, and Australia. Early projects included The Decameron Web and the Brown-University of Bologna Pico della Mirandola Project.

In its early phase, collaborative editing was seen as a meaningful way to engage new techniques and methodologies applied to a textual typology representative of the Italian humanist tradition. More recently, in collaboration with the Brown Library, the VHL has included projects which focus on the development of special collections and archives, with an emphasis on visualization, such as the Garibaldi Panorama & the Risorgimento Archive, and the Theater that Was Rome. 

Finallythe presentation will touch upon the latest initiative led by Riva: a pilot project of the Brown Digital Publications Initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, consisting in a digital monograph focused on a genealogy of Virtual Reality in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries. All are welcome to this free, public talk.

Supporters include:

  • Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
  • SU Libraries
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Syracuse University Humanities Center

 

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Writing Your Times: Poetry, Narrative, and Witness

Apr 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Laure-Anne Bosselaar (Pine Manor College)
Phil Memmer (YMCA Downtown Writers Center)

Preceding an evening of poetry, Bosselaar conducts a breakfast mini-seminar focused on the narrative elements of poems: how do poems tell stories, and how does storytelling function differently in a poem (for both the writer and the reader) than in other forms of writing? This session, facilitated by Memmer, is designed for serious writers and instructors, advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, faculty, and creative writing MFA students from Syracuse University.

To RSVP, contact Phil Memmer [315-474-6851 x328] by April 19 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

NOTE: THIS IS A RESCHEDULED DATE! (originally planned for 4/5/19)

Supporters include:

  • New York State Council on the Arts
  • Onondaga County
  • Syracuse University Humanities Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Rooms Remembered: A Reading by Poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar

Apr 25, 2019, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

a photo related to the event

Acclaimed poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar’s four books exquisitely demonstrate how the unique particulars of an individual’s life stories -- the horrors of anti-Semitism, the pain of childhood neglect and abuse, the grief of losing a spouse -- can, through the filter of art, shimmer with universal truths. Audience Q&A and a book-signing follows her reading.

NOTE: THIS IS A RESCHEDULED DATE! (originally planned for 4/4/19)

Supporters include:

  • New York State Council on the Arts
  • Onondaga County
  • Syracuse University Humanities Center

Biography: Laure-Anne Bosselaar is the author and of The Hour Between Dog and Wolf, and of  Small Gods of Grief which was awarded the Isabella Gardner Prize for Poetry. Her third poetry collection, A New Hunger, was selected as an ALA Notable Book in 2008. Her next book, These Many Rooms, will be published in January 2019. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, and her poems have appeared such publications as The Washington Post, Georgia Review, Harvard Review, and Ploughshares, among others. She is also the editor of four anthologies: Night Out: Poems about Hotels, Motels, Restaurants and Bars, Outsiders: Poems about Rebels, Exiles and Renegades, Urban Nature: Poems about Wildlife in the Cities, and Never Before: Poems about First Experiences. She taught poetry at Emerson College and at the MFA in Creative Writing Program at Sarah Lawrence College, and also served as the McEver Chair for Visiting Writers at Georgia Tech University in Atlanta, Georgia. Currently, she is a member of the founding faculty at the Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program of Pine Manor College.

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Humanities NY Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Presentations

May 3, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss their experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects:


Black Women, Black Youth and the Struggle for Education as the Practice of Freedom

Camilla J. Bell (Ph.D. Candidate, Cultural Foundations of Education)

In partnership with the Community Folk Art Center, Bell has developed a 2-day retreat for former participants of the 2018 Summer Arts and Culture Camp. Requesting feedback from former participants, their families, and a select group of facilitators, Bell hopes to amplify the voices not often engaged when it comes to program development. Furthermore, she aims to highlight the importance of community based organizations anchored by principles of social and educational justice. In so doing, this project acknowledges the (in)visible actors who facilitate education as the practice of freedom for Black youth within and beyond the formal school setting. 


Deconstructing Structure: Creating Writing and Arts Programs in a Community Learning Center and Beyond

Gemma Cooper-Novack (Ph.D. Student, Literacy Education)

How can you both enter a space with a vision and connect to students' needs and wants?


All are welcome. Contact Aimee Germain for more information. Please send any accessibility accommodation requests by April 26.

Click to view or download the event flier.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

1st Annual CNY Humanities Corridor Undergraduate Conference in Critical Theory

May 7, 2019, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Undergraduates from Cornell and Syracuse University present original research, with reception at 5 p.m. RSVP to Aimee Germain by Apr. 29; include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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