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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

A Dream of A New Past

Oct 29, 2020, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Virtual Event

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Philip Metres (John Carroll University)

Acclaimed poet, Metres, is a Guggenheim Fellow and professor of English and director of the Peace, Justice, and Human Rights program at John Carroll University. He will read from his latest collection of poems, Shrapnel Maps, centered on the Israel/Palestine conflict, illustrating both the possibility and challenge of moving toward a peaceful future.

Register here!

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Writing into the Wounds

Oct 30, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Virtual Event

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Philip Metres (John Carroll University)

Discussing his own work, Metres has said, “I believe that poetry can be a technology to help remember the past, but not be suffocated by it. To listen to the ancestors in the spirit world, but not worship them or be imprisoned by them. A technology to dream the future, but not be destroyed by it. To remember what we have not yet known.”

In this writer's mini-seminar, Metres focuses on these ideas, and the important work poetry can do. The session will be moderated by poet and Downtown Writers Center director Philip Memmer.

Register here!

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Using Art for Transformative Teaching

Nov 6, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

This virtual workshop challenges participants to think about the future of teaching in a highly visual world. Technology in the 21st-century bombards us with images on our many screens and yet, visual literacy—the ability to critically look at an image and understand why it leads you to have certain thoughts or emotions—is not commonly taught across all disciplines.

Gustafson and Syracuse University Art Museum director Vanja Malloy will offer a similar workshop in Spring '21.

The Syracuse University Art Museum houses 45,000 artworks that capture moments in history from antiquity to present, providing countless opportunities to discuss everything from the materiality of pigments in ancient art to the Black Lives Movement in contemporary artwork.

RSVP by Nov. 2 for zoom information; please include any accessibility accommodation requests.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Music, Peace, and Justice in the Americas: A Tribute to John Burdick with Samba Laranja

Nov 6, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Virtual

Elisa Dekaney (VPA / Samba Laranja)
Joshua Dekaney (VPA / Samba Laranja)

The Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA) has created a year-long music series to honor the life of John Burdick (Anthropology). All are welcome to enjoy this "Zoom room" gathering.

Register here.


About Samba Laranja: Led by the Dekaneys, this ensemble performs various styles of Brazilian music, particularly music of the African tradition such as maracatu, samba, and capoeira. Playing Brazilian instruments such as alfaia, gonguê, surdo, agogô and berimbau, the performers share the rhythmically complex music of Brazil. Among Samba Laranja’s most notable accomplishments are several Syracuse Music Awards and performances at Jazz at Lincoln Center illin New York City. This concert, in honor of Dr. John Burdick, will feature choros by Afro-Brazilian composer Pixinguinha and samba by poet-composer Chico Buarque. Additionally, the concert will feature batucadas de samba, maracatu, and capoeira.

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Mithila Art in the Time of COVID-19

Nov 7, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

Virtual

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Prerna Jha
Rani Jha

Avinash Karn
Shalini Kumari
Susan Wadley (Professor Emerita, Anthropology)

Image: Kanchan Jha's “Frontline Corona Warrior” (2020)

Join Professor Wadley and contemporary Mithila artists for a discussion centering on their art practice in the time of the COVID pandemic.

Register here for the Zoom session.

Additional supporters:

  • SU Art Museum
  • South Asia Center
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Surrender as Method, Subject, and Experience: Doing the Work that Undoes Us

Nov 10, 2020, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Virtual Event

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Jessica Restaino (Montclair State University)

In her award winning book Surrender: Feminist Rhetoric and Ethics in Love and Illness, Restaino takes up a two-year ethnography project with friend and collaborator Susan Lundy Maute, through the last two years of Maute’s life with terminal breast cancer. This public lecture introduces a series of core concepts from Surrender: “cut pieces,” which can represent messy and destabilized researcher-writer subjectivities and the uncertain texts produced when we are engaged with work that overwhelms us; “misfit tools,” which are rhetorical guide posts for identifying methods that disrupt traditional expectations for how and why we do our work; and finally “love” as a (difficult) concept that has a necessary place in research and writing work that pushes our most deeply-held boundaries.

RSVP here to receive event link.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Health Humanities Integrated Learning Major
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Burton Blatt Institute - Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In Process and Collaboration: A Shared Snapshot of Co-Ethnography in Medical Practice

Nov 11, 2020, 1:30 PM-3:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Jessica Restaino (Montclair State University)
Damali Campbell-Oparaji MD (University Hospital-Newark, NJ)

Restaino and Campbell-Oparaji (pictured) discuss their ongoing collaboration on a range of issues: race, gender, and mental health biases in medicine; the complex work of medical education, its traditions and hierarchies; the physician as subject (family life; professional status; intersectional identities); and the complexities of collaboration, including Restaino’s status as non-medical expert as well as her own intersectional identities. Campbell-Oparaji and Restaino talk about how they’ve framed their work (so far); what sorts of questions, challenges, and innovations have emerged; and their sense of the need for writing about and through the experience of medical practice. The closing segment of this workshop invites participants' questions and comments about their own collaborative challenges.

Space is limited; RSVP by Nov 2 to receive event link.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Health Humanities Integrated Learning Major
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Burton Blatt Institute - Office of Interdisciplinary Programs and Outreach
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Rewriting History

Nov 12, 2020, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Fabiola Jean-Louis
Tanisha Jackson (Syracuse University-CFAC)
Yvonne Buchanan (Syracuse University-VPA)
Shana Gelin (Syracuse University-OMA)

In celebration of Point of Contact Gallery's concurrent exhibition by multi media artist, Fabiola Jean-Louis, this panel discussion delves into Jean-Louis’ body of work, which addresses complicated layers of self-awareness and what makes up the historical truths we have been taught to accept about race and the roles of women, both past and present.

Jean-Louis' art questions and thereby magnifies the injustice of the foundational structure of our society while implicitly asking the viewer to make a change. In this way, Rewriting History engages with a vision of the future – one of resilience, and justice. Our understanding of history is malleable and through its continual questioning, we are able to change the trajectory of the future.

Visit Point of Contact page for zoom info.

Exhibit runs Sept. 7 - Nov. 20, viewable by appointment. Click to schedule a visit or call 315-443-2169.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences
  • Syracuse University Coalition of Museum and Art Centers (CMAC)
  • Humanities New York Community Partnership Grant
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Building a Publishing Pipeline: Concrete Strategies for Increasing Your Writing Productivity

Dec 11, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual

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Erin Furtak (University of Colorado - Boulder)

Offered through the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD), Furtak leads a workshop designed to help humanities scholars:

  • establish a sustainable daily writing practice
  • experiment with a tracking system to analyze where to focus your writing and research efforts
  • make a concrete action plan for moving several projects forward simultaneously
  • celebrate the process of moving your work from one stage of the pipeline to the next

Save the date: registration information coming soon!

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Looking Back, Looking Forward: Choices, Careers and Living Black History

Feb 11, 2021, 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Virtual

Daina Ramey Berry (University of Texas at Austin)
Erica Armstrong Dunbar (Rutgers University)
P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)
Shirley Moody-Turner (Pennsylvania State University)

Three distinguished Black women historians and intellectuals join Foreman, this year's Watson Professor, to reflect on their decades in the academy, navigating career and institutional challenges while seeking to recenter Black lives, thought, and words in their disciplines of English and History and to bring transformative change to higher education.

RSVP by Feb. 3 to humcenter@syr.edu.


This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Patty Roylance, Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; and Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In the Bush: Writings by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

Feb 24, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Join discussion of selected readings by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson—an indigenous writer, musician and scholar—to include the article, “Land as Pedagogy,” and the forthcoming "Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies," as suggested additional reading.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Native and Indigenous Studies
  • Disability Studies
  • Native Students Program
  • Resilient Indigenous Action Collective
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
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Strategies for Academic Success: Know Your Value/s – BIPOC Focused

Feb 26, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:30 PM

Virtual

P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)

What values inspire you and drive your work? How can you develop a professional mission statement tied to those values? How can we shift our ideas about ourselves as scholars, and about mentoring—and reframe our notions of a singular mentor? This first of two Friday workshops hosted by Watson Professor Foreman is geared specifically toward Black, Indigenous, people of color faculty, staff, and administrators.

Space is limited; please RSVP by Feb. 21 to humcenter@syr.edu and include any accessibility requests.


This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Patty Roylance, Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; and Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Resettling: A Film Screening and Conversation with the 2020-21 Narratio Fellows

Feb 26, 2021, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Ana Vîjdea (Narratio Artist-in-Residence, 2020-21)
Ahmed Badr (Narratio.org founder)

2020-21 Narratio Fellows:

Isho Adan (Onondaga Community College)
Hawa Ahmed (Nottingham H.S.)
Rayan Mohamed (Henninger H.S.)
Felone Nganga (Henninger H.S.)
Hibbatullah Shaalan (Nottingham H.S.)
Aman Yohannes (Onondaga Community College)
Participate in an inaugural screening of seven short autobiographical films by refugee young about their day-to-day lives during the pandemic and in the context of resettlement and a global movement for racial justice. Film screenings will be followed by virtual discussion of the power of storying lives through film.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Biidaaban: Indigenous Knowledges, Resistance, and Resilience

Mar 4, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and Amanda Strong answer your questions about the film Biidaaban (a short film screened during the session), maple sugaring, Indigenous resurgence and rematriation.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Native and Indigenous Studies
  • Disability Studies
  • Native Students Program
  • Resilient Indigenous Action Collective
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
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Strategies for Academic Success: Know Your Value/s

Mar 5, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:30 PM

Virtual

P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)

What values inspire you and drive your work? How can you develop a professional mission statement tied to those values? How can we shift our ideas about ourselves as scholars, and about mentoring—and reframe our notions of a singular mentor? This Friday workshop hosted by Watson Professor Foreman is open to faculty, staff, and administrators. 

Space is limited; please RSVP by March 1 to humcenter@syr.edu and include any accessibility requests.


This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Patty Roylance, Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; and Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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National Endowment for the Humanities: a Virtual Info Session

Mar 19, 2021, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

virtual

An NEH representative will present an overview of funding opportunities. Check back for developing details and registration information.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

On The Future of New Plays

Mar 23, 2021, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM

Virtual Event

Kyle Bass (Syracuse Stage, Colgate University)
Kate Hamill (Playwright/Performer)
Chesney Snow (Artist/Playwright/Educator)
Evan Starling-Davis (Syracuse University)
Robert Hupp (Syracuse Stage)

Aligning with the ideas of "Futures," this panel discussion within the "Cold Reads Festival of New Plays" (March 24-28) offers its audience a rare opportunity to witness how creative artists envision a future and develop new work.  How do these writers come up with content? What does it mean to be a part of post-Covid-19 America? How will their work impact the future of playwriting?

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Future of Teaching is... Visual!

Mar 25, 2021, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

Gustafson presents a public lecture on different pathways to foster interdisciplinary discussions of non-verbal and non-narrative communication in art through observation, analysis, historical context, emotional and/or aesthetic appeal.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Using Art for Transformative Teaching (Spring Workshop)

Apr 5, 2021, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

As a spring companion to a workshop offered in Fall 2020, Gustafson rejoins Syracuse University Art Museum director Vanja Malloy to lead a workshop exploring innovative ways of using art for teaching across the disciplines.

The Syracuse University Art Museum houses 45,000 artworks that capture moments in history from antiquity to present, providing countless opportunities to discuss everything from the materiality of pigments in ancient art to the Black Lives Movement in contemporary artwork.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Pushing Boundaries: Art as Activism in a Changing South Asia

Apr 9, 2021, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Virtual Event

Mariam Durrani (Hamilton College)
Tula Goenka (Syracuse University)
Daya Kulkarni (Aarogya Seva)
Shanti (The Aravani Art Project)
Suchitra Vijayan (The Polis Project)

Moderated by Goenka, a panel of scholars, artists, and activists working in South Asia discuss art as a form of resistance against oppression to imagine a more equitable future.

Following a short break, this group of scholars hosts a more interactive virtual workshop for artists interested in forms of creative activism.

Register here for the panel discussion.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making Change: A Workshop on Activism through Art

Apr 9, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

Virtual Event

Mariam Durrani (Hamilton College)
Tula Goenka (Syracuse University)
Daya Kulkarni (Aarogya Seva)
Shanti (The Aravani Art Project)
Suchitra Vijayan (The Polis Project)

During this workshop, invited artist/activists will work with participants on ways to operationalize their activism through art such as photography, documentary film, painting, and the written word.

This workshop acts as an interactive "part 2," following a morning panel discussion by guest scholars.

Register here for the workshop.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In Succession: Performing Black Vernacular Genealogies

Apr 15, 2021, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Steffani Jemison (Rutgers University)

Hosted by Urban Video Project, multimedia artist Steffani Jemison presents a new collaborative performance exploring black vernacular genealogies that bypass the "old masters," tracing forms of embodied knowledge from the past into the present and future. This event coincides with an exhibition of Jemison's new video work projected by Urban Video Project on the facade of the Everson Museum.

Event link coming soon. For more information, email info@urbanvideoproject.com.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Transmedia
  • Everson Museum of Art
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Why Didn’t We Know?! Seven Decades of 19th-Century Black Political Organizing

Apr 16, 2021, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Virtual

Joan Bryant (Syracuse University)
Jim Casey (Pennsylvania State University) 
P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)
Derrick R. Spires (Cornell University)
Psyche Williams-Forson (University of Maryland)

Authors discuss the 70-year Colored Conventions movement, the prequel to the NAACP, Civil Rights, and Black Lives Matter movements. Dialogue celebrates the publication of The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century (UNC Press, 2021) – a pivotal first volume on the Conventions that places Black organizing for legal, educational and labor rights and equal protection at the center of 19th-century race and reform.

Please RSVP by April 14 to humcenter@syr.edu.


This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Patty Roylance, Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; and Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Race, Space, and the Environment

Apr 22, 2021, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

Zolani Mahola (Cape Town, South African musician)
Jaleel Campbell (Syracuse artist / illustrator)
Jamie Herring (HabitatSeven-Ottawa, CA) 
Farhana Sultana (Syracuse University, Geography)
Janice Limson (Rhodes University)
Ernest Nkansah-Dwamena (SUNY-ESF Visiting Assistant Professor)
Xolile Madinda (University of Virgina)

This interdisciplinary, interactive multimedia symposium brings together scholars and professionals from Syracuse and South Africa to investigate the intersections of race and the environment, and impacts of climate change on marginalized and racialized populations.

Using a non-traditional, pioneering, sustainable and accessible modality, conference participants engage across distance in dialogue and through large-scale public multimedia installations (online and on site), created by the interdisciplinary cohort of topic experts. 

This live online conversation invites Q&A from the community, with the premise that creative responses to global injustices and threats emerge when people with different worldviews come together to seek sustainable solutions.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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