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Upcoming Events

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Graphic Medicine: Can Comics Improve Our Health?

Jan 23, 2020, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

New Academic Building 4414BC (Accessible through Weiskotten Hall) SUNY Upstate Medical University

a photo related to the event

MK Czerwiec (Nurse and comic creator)

In this talk, nurse, cartoonist, and co-founder of the field of Graphic Medicine MK Czerwiec (Comic Nurse) visits the Consortium for Culture and Medicine to discuss how comics can help improve our health by making health education more engaging, by amplifying the perspectives of patients and families, as a tool for conducting and translating our research, and as a means by which we can explore our experiences with health, illness, disability, and caregiving.

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided. For information on parking or to request additional accommodations, please contact Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri at 315-443-2156 or razubal@law.syr.edu by 1/17/20.

Additional supporters:


Biography: Czerwiec is Artist-in-Residence at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine and a Senior Fellow of the George Washington School of Nursing Center for Health Policy & Media Engagement; co-editor, “Graphic Medicine” website

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Info Session: Applying for New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellowships for 2020-21

Jan 24, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Interested students are welcome to attend this information session in prepreparation for the next call for applicants for the 2020-21 Public Humanities Graduate Fellowship program, a shared initiative of the Humanities Center and the CNY Humanities Corridor, in partnership with Humanities New York.

At this jointly-hosted information session, current and former fellows will talk about the fellowship and answer questions. Light breakfast available.

Download the event flier for additional information.

More about the fellowships:

At Syracuse University, the program is open to graduate students pursuing a PhD in Anthropology, Composition & Cultural Rhetoric, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Cultural Foundations of Education, or Literacy in Education. It is also open to graduate students pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing or in VPA (3-year MFA programs only).

Each year, Syracuse University is granted two fellowships. Learn more about our current and prior fellows.

Application links are at the HNY website.​

Early/additional questions? Contact Humanities New York Program Officer Adam Capitanio, 212-233-1131.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Cultivating Care: A Graphic Medicine Workshop

Jan 24, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Setnor Hall 3509/10 (Accessible through Weiskotten Hall) SUNY Upstate Medical University

MK Czerwiec (Nurse and comic creator)

In this engaged “hands-on” workshop, participants will have the opportunity to participate in graphic medicine exercises led by MK Czerwiec, a leader in the graphic medicine field. The workshop will give students, faculty, staff, and community members new ways to explore experiences of health, disability, illness, healthcare, and health science education.

American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be provided. For information on parking or to request additional accommodations, please contact Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri at 315-443-2156 or razubal@law.syr.edu by 1/17/20.

Additional supporters:


Biography: Czerwiec is Artist-in-Residence at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine and a Senior Fellow of the George Washington School of Nursing Center for Health Policy & Media Engagement; co-editor, “Graphic Medicine” website

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Intertwined Journeys

Jan 24, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Community Folk Art Center, 805 E. Genesee Street

a photo related to the event

Ahmed Badr (Wesleyan University)

This exhibit showcases an ongoing collaboration between Narratio, a global platform for the creative expression of refugee youth; the Northside Learning Center; Syracuse University; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This official reception features a public talk from writer and founder of Narratio, Ahmed Badr, and readings of original poetry by resettled refugee writers from across the world.

Exhibit runs January 20-31, during CFAC hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (extended hours during evening programs)

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Austerity and Institutional Ethnography: A Workshop

Jan 29, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Michelle LaFrance (George Mason University)

LaFrance demonstrates methods in institutional ethnography with a view toward opening the possibilities for critical inquiry into austerity-era higher education. Participants will consider fundamental analytical frames that LaFrance employs in her method, including ruling relations, standpoint, social coordination, experience, work, institutional discourse, and texts/textual mediation.

RSVP to Erika Dwyer by Jan. 15 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

LaFrance also presents a public lecture later in the afternoon.

This event is organized by the "LLC26 Composition, Labor, and Embodiment" working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Institutional Ethnography: A Feminist Method for Studying Academic Labor

Jan 29, 2020, 2:15 PM-3:35 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Michelle LaFrance (George Mason University)

LaFrance illustrates how institutional ethnography (IE) can be used as a means of better understanding the relationships between teaching conditions and terms of labor, particularly in the learning environments of austerity-era postsecondary writing education.

This event is organized by the "LLC26 Composition, Labor, and Embodiment" working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

When I has my likeness took: Black Subjects and the Modernization of Photography

Jan 30, 2020, 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Slocum Auditorium

Joan Bryant (African American Studies)

What did it mean to be a modern black photographic subject in images produced by white photographers?

Bryant's talk explores issues in the SUArt exhibition, Black Subjects in Modern Media Photography: Photographs from the George R. Rinhart Collection. It analyzes how white photographers presented people and practices as black subjects while the medium was becoming increasingly modern in the first half of the twentieth century.  It reflects on the silences regarding black people’s efforts to assert identities through mechanisms they did not control. Finally, it maps how photographers, their subjects, and viewers negotiated and contested diverse meanings of blackness. 

A reception follows the talk.

Additional supporters:

  • SUART Galleries
  • African American Studies Department 
  • Newhouse  
  • Community Folk Art Center (CFAC)
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Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows Presentations

Jan 31, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Haejoo Kim (Ph.D. candidate, English)
Aley O'Mara (Ph.D. candidate, English)

Enjoy coffee and light breakfast as you hear more about the research of the Humanities Center's 2019-2020 Dissertation Fellows, Kim’s "Organic Victorians: Medical Liberty and Alternative Health Practices in 19th-Century Britain" and O'Mara’s, "I cannot prove a lover”: Asexuality, Disability, and Performing Sexual Authority in Shakespeare." 

Contact humcenter@syr.edu by Jan. 24 to request any accessibility accommodations.

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Always in Translation: Contemporary Korean Poetry and Literature in English Translation

Feb 13, 2020, 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Jake Levine (Keimyung University)

Levine -- an American translator, poet, and scholar living in Korea since 2013 -- works closely with Korea’s leading poets, translating their work in numerous collections, including Kim Kyung Ju’s in Bred from the Eyes of a Wolf (2018) and Kim Yideum’s in Hysteria (2019). This reading from Always in Translation showcases these poets’ work followed by insightful discussion into the process and politics of translating Korean poetry.

Additional supporters:

Moynihan's East Asia Program

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Frederick Douglass Day of Service: Transcribe-a-Thon of Materials by 19th-Century Black Feminist, Anna Julia Cooper

Feb 14, 2020, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Mark Frederick Douglass' 202nd birthday by participating in a national day of service to digitize materials by 19th-century Black feminist scholar/educator/activist, Anna Julia Cooper: transcribe-a-thon accompanied by livestream of brief talks and performances from Howard University. Contact humcenter@syr.edu by 2/7/20 to register for half-hour slot(s); include any accommodations requests, and please let us know whether or not you can bring a laptop.

Partners:

Additional supporters:

  • Department of English
  • Department of History
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
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Decentering Citizenship

Feb 18, 2020, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

060 Eggers

a photo related to the event

Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto-Mississauga)

Choo talks about her book, Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea, which explores the struggle for belonging among three groups of Filipina migrants: factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and hostesses in American military clubs.

Additional supporters:

  • Asian/Asian American Studies Program
  • East Asian Studies
  • Geography
  • Political Science
  • Sociology Graduate Student Association
  • Women's and Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Perfect Victim: Why American Culture Prefers Dead (White) Girls

Feb 18, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Alice Bolin (Author)

Pop culture writer, Bolin, talks about her book, Dead Girls: Surviving an American Obsession.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Black Music and Black Power in the Era of #BlackLivesMatter

Feb 19, 2020, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Mark Lomax (Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH)

2015 was a landmark year for hip-hop artists Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole who made headlines by making clear artistic statements aligning them with the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Despite the success seen by both artists, it seems that the majority of well-known African American musicians have been reluctant to make similar statements which is a stark departure from the traditional role Black music has played in past movements.

 

After a brief overview of how music was used by Blacks in America as a means of resistance, Lomax addresses the possible socio-cultural and political implications of using Black music as an expression of positive Black cultural identity and Black power in the age of #BlackLivesMatter.


Bio: Dr. Mark Lomax, II, critically acclaimed composer, recording artist, drummer, activist, and educator is a Wexner Center for the Arts at the Ohio State University Artist Residency 2018 Award recipient. A highly sought-after lecturer, Lomax specializes in the socio-political, and spiritual aspects of African-American art, music, race, and the usage of the arts to build community. Besides performing with gospel choirs around the country, Lomax also boasts impressive jazz credentials. He has toured with the Delfeayo Marsalis Sextet and worked with notable artists such as Clark Terry, Marlon Jordan, Azar Lawrence, Bennie Maupin, Billy Harper, Nicholas Payton, Ellis Marsalis, and Wessel Anderson, among others.

 

Lomax holds a Doctor of Music Arts degree in composition from The Ohio State University. In January 2019, Lomax released 400: An Afrikan Epic, a composition that ambitiously tells the story of the Afrikan diaspora over the course of a 12 album cycle.  

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Black Composer as Jali: Composition, Improvisation, and the Afrikan Epic

Feb 20, 2020, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM

CFAC Gallery, 805 E. Genesee Street

Mark Lomax (Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH)

In the West Afrikan storytelling tradition, the Jali serve as the professional musicians tasked with preserving the history, rituals, and experiences of the culture in which they were born. These keepers of the culture tell the stories of their people through songs that seamlessly incorporate pre-composed material with improvised sections to create epic narratives that remind the listener who they are, where they have been, and point to the future. This tradition survived the Middle Passage, evolved through the savagery of slavery, and now manifests itself in the work of many contemporary Black American composers.

Using examples from his work, 400: An Afrikan Epic, Lomax discusses the process by which he worked with composition and improvisation to create aspects of his epic which honors the West Afrikan tradition and is inspired by the work of Duke Ellington, Renee Baker, Anthony Davis, and Wadada Leo Smith.


Bio: Dr. Mark Lomax, II, critically acclaimed composer, recording artist, drummer, activist, and educator is a Wexner Center for the Arts at the Ohio State University Artist Residency 2018 Award recipient. A highly sought-after lecturer, Lomax specializes in the socio-political, and spiritual aspects of African-American art, music, race, and the usage of the arts to build community. Besides performing with gospel choirs around the country, Lomax also boasts impressive jazz credentials. He has toured with the Delfeayo Marsalis Sextet and worked with notable artists such as Clark Terry, Marlon Jordan, Azar Lawrence, Bennie Maupin, Billy Harper, Nicholas Payton, Ellis Marsalis, and Wessel Anderson, among others.

 

Lomax holds a Doctor of Music Arts degree in composition from The Ohio State University. In January 2019, Lomax released 400: An Afrikan Epic, a composition that ambitiously tells the story of the Afrikan diaspora over the course of a 12 album cycle.  

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Curatorial Concerns in Jazz

Feb 24, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholary Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Gerald Veasley (Philadelphia, PA)
Jazmin Ghent (Bartow, FL)
Tanisha Jackson (Community Folk Art Center)
Theo Cateforis (Art and Music Histories)

Veasley, renowned bassist, founder of the Bass Boot Camp, musical host of the Berks Jazz Fest, and curator of the “Unscripted” Jazz Series -- along with fast-rising saxophonist/vocalist/educator Ghent – a Veasley protégé and 2019 NAACP award winner -- reflect on their paths to success in the music industry. All are welcome to this hour of music and dialogue hosted by CNY Jazz Central, facilitated by panelists Jackson and Cateforis.

Music students and spectators are also invited to register for free a master class opportunity offered in the evening, from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Community Folk Art Center (CFAC), 805 E. Genesee Street. Please RSVP by Feb. 21 to Spencer Stultz at 315-442-2230. Include any accessibility requests.


Biographies:

Gerald Veasley, musical polymath, played in West Philly RnB bands in his teens. He entered the international marketplace as bassist for the legendary Joe Zawinul, playing in The Zawinul Syndicate from 1988 to 1995. A successful recording and touring career as leader followed. Among his many musical associations are projects with Odean Pope and Grover Washington, Jr.

The young Jazmin Ghent was voted "2017's Best New Smooth Jazz Artist" and was awarded the prestigious 2019 NAACP Image Award" for Outstanding Jazz Album: The Story of Jaz. Jazmin has three Billboard #1 singles to her credit: "Work Wit It," “Heat” and “Compared to What”. Jazmin has performed at major festivals and venues throughout the country, in Europe, and Australia. In addition to performing, she teaches music in Polk County Florida. Jazmin received a bachelor’s degree (Mus.Ed.) from Florida State University and a Masters degree from Tennessee State University. 


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • CNY Jazz Central
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Visibly Hidden: Exploring Queer Masculinities in 1950s Popular Music

Mar 2, 2020, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird

Vincent Stephens (Dickinson College)

American audiences of the 1950s regularly consumed gender transgressions in popular media well before they were aware of LGTBQ identities, communities, or politics. “Visibly Hidden” examines how the public personae of four popular male musicians of the era, Johnnie Ray, Little Richard, Johnny Mathis and Liberace, deftly expanded the boundaries of male gender expression before the emergence of queer visibility politics.

Stephens talk draws from his forthcoming 2019 book, Rocking the Closet: How Little Richard, Johnnie Ray, Liberace, and Johnny Mathis Queered Pop Music (University of Illinois Press). Stephens is currently Director of the Popel Shaw Center for Race and Diversity, and a contributing faculty member in the Department of Music, at Dickinson College. He has published widely in the Humanities, on topics ranging from hip hop and gender, and the aesthetics of vocal jazz and pop to the politics of sexual disclosure in popular music. Stephens was also a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Syracuse University (2006–2010).

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Goldring Arts Journalism
  • Women and Gender Studies
  • LGBT Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Concert by The American Spiritual Ensemble

Mar 8, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Dr. Everett McCorvey (Director)

This performance, featured as part of Hendrick Chapel's "Music and Message" series, includes American Negro Spirituals and music of the Black Experience. Reception to follow.

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Mar 9, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Times and locations listed on individual event pages

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency unfolds in two separate one-week visits.

 

"Week 1" [March 9-13] schedule includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception at the Goldstein Alumni & Visitors Center

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Friday, March 13 - Building Connections: Grad Student Talkback (social hour)

 

"Week 2" [April 6-10] schedule includes:

Monday, April 6 - Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration (interdisciplinary panel featuring Cati de los Ríos, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday 7- Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Lawrence "Torry" Winn, Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research? (discussions led by Winn and TJE colleagues)

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle (dialogue about how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices)


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Welcome Reception for Maisha T. Winn

Mar 9, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts, and Activism

Meet Winn, this year's Watson Professor, and learn more about the topics she'll address during her mini-residency -- two separate weeks on campus -- March 9-13 and April 6-10.

Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.

ASL provided. Please contact humcenter@syr.edu by Feb. 28 with any other accessibility accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn's research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mother Music: How African-American Spirituals Shaped American Musical Styles

Mar 10, 2020, 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Everett McCorvey (Director)

Lecture and recital conducted by McCorvey and the American Spiritual Ensemble.

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Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education

Mar 10, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Watson Theater

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Winn discusses how the Black Arts Movement and Independent Black Institutions (IBIs) cultivated and celebrated Black literate lives. She connects this history to contemporary transformative justice activism in schools and communities. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods

Mar 11, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Winn offers a workshop on equity-oriented, justice-seeking research in the humanities, focusing on listening, storytelling, and acting with and through communities. Space is limited. Please RSVP by Feb. 26 to  ecdwyer@syr.edu, and include any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lift Every Voice and Sing!

Mar 11, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Setnor Auditorium, Crouse College

Setnor School of Music choral ensembles join The American Spiritual Ensemble in concert.

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Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Mar 12, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Juanita Rivera-Ortiz (YWCA of Syracuse and Onondaga County and Jamesville-Dewitt CSD Boards)
Rob Scott (Cornell Prison Education Program)

Educators and community members join Winn to discuss how restorative justice can help schools effectively address race, class, and gender inequalities. Fifteen copies of Justice on Both Sides will be given to graduate students and community partners at the event. Co-sponsored by the Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Building Connections: The Grad Student Talkback

Mar 13, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

Sainsbury Library, 300 Tolley Humanities Building

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Graduate students are invited to meet with Winn to discuss shared interests over a light breakfast. Please contact ecdwyer@syr.edu by Feb. 28 with any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. And the substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Tracing Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape

Mar 26, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Lauret E. Savoy (Mount Holyoke College)

Syracuse Symposium celebrates Syracuse University's Sesquecentennial week with a return by alumna Lauret Savoy (Ph.D. '91). 

Drawing from her prizewinning images, current work on Washington, DC, and Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape, her award-winning volume exploring identity, place, and the unvoiced presence of the past, Savoy discusses how this country’s still unfolding history marks a person, a people, and the land itself. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Indigenous ancestry, she weaves together narratives of migration, displacement, and erasure to counter longstanding and damaging public silences to reveal often-unrecognized ties, such as the siting of the nation’s capital and the economic motives of slavery. None of these links is coincidental. Few appear in public history.

(Photo credit: Kris Bergbom)


Bio: Lauret Edith Savoy is the David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies & Geology at Mount Holyoke College as well as a writer, photographer, and pilot. Winner of Mount Holyoke’s Distinguished Teaching Award and an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, she explores the marks of this nation’s history on a people and the land.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Narrating Personal, Familial, and Historical Silences

Mar 27, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Lauret Savoy (Mount Holyoke)

Savoy explores how, to live in this country is to be marked by the land, by the presence of the past, and by selective memory and countless historical silences. Space is limited: RSVP to humcenter@syr.edu by Mar. 20 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Political Listening: the Forensic Acoustics of Lawrence Abu Hamdan

Mar 27, 2020, 5:15 PM-7:30 PM

Slocum Auditorium

Lawrence Abu Hamdan (University of London)

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, artist and audio investigator for the renowned Forensic Architecture agency at Goldsmiths College, screens recent work and delivers a talk exploring acoustics - and silence - as a political dimension.

Additional supporters:

  • Light Work UVP
  • School of Architecture
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts Department of Transmedia
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing, Drawing as Meditation

Mar 30, 2020, 10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford C. Grant (Howard University)

Prior to his public talk later in the afternoon, Grant meets with registrants to explore how silent contemplation can be a powerful tool for social justice. 

Please RSVP to Meghan Graham (315-443-2005) by Monday, March 9 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

  • Center for Learning and Student Success
  • Falk College
  • Dean of Students Robert Hradsky
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Diversity Office
  • Student-Athlete Academic Support
  • School of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Contemplative Collaborative

Bio: Bradford C. Grant is a Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, Washington DC. He has been in leadership roles at Hampton and Howard Universities as Chairperson, Director, Associate Dean and Interim Dean. As a registered architect and educator he has extensive experience in community design and contemplative practices in design education. Grant is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), a former board member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), past chair of the Humanities DC and the current board president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

Grant holds a Masters of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and the undergraduate first professional degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seeing, Drawing, Silence

Mar 30, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford C. Grant (Howard University)

Silent contemplation can be a powerful tool for social justice. Dr. Grant’s research and teaching connect personal insights gained through meditative drawing with political action in creating spaces premised on universal design. His talk reflects on the meaning of seeing and its practical and political manifestations in design.

Additional supporters:

  • Center for Learning and Student Success
  • Falk College
  • Dean of Students Robert Hradsky
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Diversity Office
  • Student-Athlete Academic Support
  • School of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Contemplative Collaborative

Bio: Bradford C. Grant is a Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, Washington DC. He has been in leadership roles at Hampton and Howard Universities as Chairperson, Director, Associate Dean and Interim Dean. As a registered architect and educator he has extensive experience in community design and contemplative practices in design education. Grant is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), a former board member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), past chair of the Humanities DC and the current board president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

Grant holds a Masters of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and the undergraduate first professional degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA.

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Using Humor in Teaching

Apr 1, 2020, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

LOCATION T.B.A.

Teaching is performance. Many of us stand up while teaching, but we lose the students with weak performances. This session on stand-up is offered in connection with Ken Frieden’s class on “Jewish Humor and Satire," which doubles as the final Tolley Forum event of Frieden’s two-year term as Tolley Professor of the Humanities. Citing national trends, Frieden considers stand-up comedy a metaphor and a practice, naming a form of resistance at a time when reason fails us.

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts and Sciences / Tolley Professorship
  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
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Humor and the Humanities: Performing Stand-Up

Apr 3, 2020, 2:00 PM-6:00 PM

TIME AND LOCATION T.B.A.

Following a series of classroom visits and workshops through the week, two world-class teachers of stand-up from the American Comedy Institute visit campus to work with interested students and faculty on original comic material. Save this date for a performance which showcases the results of this work. Additional details will be posted as they develop.

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts and Sciences / Tolley Professorship
  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Apr 6, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency unfolds in two separate one-week visits.

 

"Week 1" [March 9-13] schedule includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception at the Goldstein Alumni & Visitors Center

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Friday, March 13 - Building Connections: Grad Student Talkback (social hour)

 

"Week 2" [April 6-10] schedule includes:

Monday, April 6 - Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration (interdisciplinary panel featuring Cati de los Ríos, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday 7- Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Lawrence "Torry" Winn, Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research? (discussions led by Winn and TJE colleagues)

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle (dialogue about how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices)


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration

Apr 6, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Erika Bullock (UW Madison)
Cati de los Ríos (UC Davis)
Rita Kohli (UC Riverside)

What does it mean to teach and learn in an age of mass/hyper-incarceration? Countering how multiply-marginalized students and their families continue to be criminalized, panelists share teaching strategies drawing on transformative justice paradigms across disciplines and stages of education. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

 

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Restorative Justice Community Circles

Apr 7, 2020, 9:00 AM-7:15 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building (choose from session times, below)

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (Co-Founder/Co-Director, Transformative Justice in Education Center, UC Davis)
Vanessa Segundo (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)
Adam D. Musser (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)

Members of the Transformative Justice in Education Center offer workshops introducing communication strategies for restorative justice work and tools for generating critical dialogues about race, class, gender, ability, and privilege. Space is limited. Please RSVP by March 24 to ecdwyer@syr.edu: include your top two time preferences from sessions below, and any accessibility accommodation requests.

Four sessions offered:

  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
  • 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
  • 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • 5:15 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research?

Apr 8, 2020, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (Co-Founder/Co-Director, Transformative Justice in Education Center, UC Davis)
Vanessa Segundo (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)
Adam D. Musser (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)

Members of the Transformative Justice in Education Center facilitate roundtable discussions focused on methods and theories for humanizing research. Topics include the California School Discipline Project, the Black Child Legacy Campaign, the Black Parent Survey Project, writing workshops in youth detention centers, and the role of campus student centers. Please contact ecdwyer@syr.edu by March 25 with any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis.  Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle

Apr 9, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Marcelle Haddix (Syracuse University)

Centered on Winn’s Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom, Haddix -- Dean's Professor & Department Chair, Reading and Language Arts Center and Co-Director of The Lender Center for Social Justice -- joins Winn and other educators to discuss how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research spans a wide variety of understudied settings including her earlier work on the literate practices extant in bookstores and community organizations in the African American community to her most recent work in settings where adolescent girls are incarcerated. Her work is multidisciplinary in that she examines the cognitive dimensions of the literate practices, the micro-level/interactional processes through which knowledge is constructed in these settings, and the socialization functions that take place through both peer relation and adult-youth relations as they emerge in these various institutions. The substance of Winn’s investigations further illuminate the roles that these institutions play within the larger cultural-historical development of racially diverse and low income communities—including populations of Dominican, Puerto Rican, Columbian and African American descent.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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5th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 21, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

If you or a fellow Syracuse University faculty/staff member or student published a book, copyright 2019, that contributes to the humanities broadly conceived, please tell us about it in the Books in the Humanities Survey on the FORMS page of our website. Survey closes December 13, 2019.

Then save the date for the Humanities Center's growing annual gathering of Syracuse University authors and editors celebrating humanities-related books released in 2019. In this Sesquicentennial year, it is especially fitting to showcase the great writing and research taking place reguarly across our campus.

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Syracuse University Bookstore
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Syracuse University Office of Research
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala on display

Apr 22, 2020, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, April 22nd and with a closing ceremony at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
  • SU Art Galleries
  • School of Architecture
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Begins

Apr 22, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, April 22nd, with observation through the week and a closing event at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
  • SU Art Galleries
  • School of Architecture
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Muslim Spaces, Jewish Pasts: Genealogies of the Split Arab / Jew Figure

Apr 23, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Ella Shohat (New York University)

Shohat argues that the question of the Arab-Jew must be posed in order to address the complex imaginaries of both “the Arab” and “the Jew,” which in contrast to present-day nationalist common sense, must be rearticulated as mutually constitutive categories. Event includes reception and audience Q&A.

Shohat's talk is co-presented by the Ray Smith Symposium in the College of Arts & Sciences.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Ends

Apr 29, 2020, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

First opening at 10 a.m. on April 22 and observable throughout the week, a closing event takes place at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
  • SU Art Galleries
  • School of Architecture
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
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