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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Rewriting History: Art Exhibition

Sep 4, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Point of Contact Gallery, 350 W. Fayette St. Syracuse, NY 13202

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Fabiola Jean-Louis

Fabiola Jean-Louis’ work is an ongoing exploration into the relationship between history, memory and identity. Her use of paper acts as a tether linking the present to a past when paper was not just a basic currency but held the power to determine the freedom of a human being. Through her series Rewriting History, Jean-Louis confronts the continual legacy of white patriarchy and interrogates how it shapes our present and future. She questions and thereby magnifies the injustice of the foundational structure of our society while implicitly asking the viewer to make a change. In this way, Rewriting History engages with a vision of the future – one of resilience, and justice. Our understanding of history is malleable and through its continual questioning, we are able to change the trajectory of the future.

Exhibit runs Sept. 4 - Nov. 20, viewable by appointment only, and features a virtual panel discussion on November 12.

Email Point of Contact Gallery to schedule a gallery visit or call 315-443-2169.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences
  • Syracuse University Coalition of Museum and Art Centers (CMAC)
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Restorative Justice Community Circles

Sep 10, 2020, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Virtual Event

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September 10, 2020, 12:30-2:00 PM (staff)
September 11, 2020, 1:00-2:30 PM (faculty)
September 14, 2020, 1:00-2:30 PM (students)

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (UC Davis)

As co-founders and co-directors of the Transformative Justice in Education Center at UC-Davis, the Winns offer separate virtual workshops for staff, faculty, and students to introduce communication strategies for restorative justice work and tools for generating critical dialogues about race, class, gender, ability, and privilege.

Space is limited. To register, please contact Linda Taylor and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

This event is part of a rescheduled 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Associate Professor – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition and Dean’s Professor of Community Engagement - College of Arts and Sciences; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
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Restorative Justice Community Circles

Sep 11, 2020, 1:00 PM-2:30 PM

Virtual Event

September 10, 2020, 12:30-2:00 PM (staff)
September 11, 2020, 1:00-2:30 PM (faculty)
September 14, 2020, 1:00-2:30 PM (students)

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (UC Davis)

As co-founders and co-directors of the Transformative Justice in Education Center at UC-Davis, the Winns offer separate virtual workshops for staff, faculty, and students to introduce communication strategies for restorative justice work and tools for generating critical dialogues about race, class, gender, ability, and privilege.

Space is limited. To register, please contact Linda Taylor and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

This event is part of a rescheduled 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Associate Professor – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition and Dean’s Professor of Community Engagement - College of Arts and Sciences; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Composing for the Organ: A Webinar

Sep 12, 2020, 12:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the eventGeorge Baker (independent composer)
Anne Laver (Syracuse University)
Jonathan Embry (Most Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Church, Syracuse)
Alexander Meszler (Mohawk Valley Community College)
Natalie Draper (Syracuse University)
Joseph Downing (Syracuse University)

The Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University hosts a webinar and virtual concert with the aim of fostering awareness of and appreciation for contemporary organ music. The events are geared to composers at any career stage and experience level who wish to learn more about writing for the organ, and organists who are interested in the compositional process.

Please RSVP by Sept. 11 to receive participation link. Visit their Facebook page for more info.

This event was organized by the “MP18 Improvisation in Theory and Practice” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.


Additional supporters:

  • Setnor School of Music, VPA
  • Special Projects Fund of the San Francisco Chapter of the American Guild of Organists
  • Mozingo Endowment of the Indianapolis Chapter of the American Guild of Organists
  • Syracuse Chapter of the American Guild of Organists
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Reimaginings: A Virtual Concert of New Music for Organ

Sep 12, 2020, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Anne Laver (Syracuse University)
Augustine Sobeng (Syracuse University)
Jonathan Embry (Most Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Church, Syracuse)
Alexander Meszler (Mohawk Valley Community College)
Natalie Draper (Syracuse University)

Enjoy a streamed concert recorded at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in downtown Syracuse, featuring new works for organ, including world premieres by Jonathan Embry and Natalie Draper.

The organ is a complex instrument with a 2000-plus year history and many composers shy away from writing for it because they find the scale and size of the instrument and the incredible diversity of style daunting. This public performance sets out to inspire future composers to write their own pieces for organ.

Several such up-and-coming performers and composers -- recent graduates of the Setnor School of Music -- are featured in this program. Jonathan Embry and Alex Meszler have gone on to receive doctorates, each making advocacy of new music part of their professional profile. Embry has composed a number of organ pieces, and Meszler serves on the National Committee for New Music for the American Guild of Organists. Augustine Sobeng, a first-year graduate student and VPA Scholar in the Setnor School of Music who hails from Ghana, is an accomplished improvisor and budding composer.

Much more than a recital of pieces, you will hear from the composers/performers themselves, offering a deeper engagement with the music and the creative process.

Connect to this YouTube concert premiere from Setnor School of Music's Facebook page.

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

Click to participate


Additional supporters:

  • Syracuse Chapter of the American Guild of Organists
  • Special Projects Fund of the San Francisco Chapter of the American Guild of Organists
  • Mozingo Endowment of the Indianapolis Chapter of the American Guild of Organists
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Restorative Justice Community Circles

Sep 14, 2020, 1:00 PM-2:30 PM

Virtual Event

September 10, 2020, 12:30-2:00 PM (staff)
September 11, 2020, 1:00-2:30 PM (faculty)
September 14, 2020, 1:00-2:30 PM (students)

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (UC Davis)

As co-founders and co-directors of the Transformative Justice in Education Center at UC-Davis, the Winns offer separate virtual workshops for staff, faculty, and students to introduce communication strategies for restorative justice work and tools for generating critical dialogues about race, class, gender, ability, and privilege.

Space is limited. To register, please contact Linda Taylor and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

This event is part of a rescheduled 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Associate Professor – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition and Dean’s Professor of Community Engagement - College of Arts and Sciences; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

Sep 15, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Juanita Rivera-Ortiz (YWCA of Syracuse and Onondaga County and Jamesville-Dewitt CSD Boards)
Rob Scott (Cornell Prison Education Program)

Educators and community members join Winn to discuss how restorative justice can help schools effectively address race, class, and gender inequalities, centered on Winn's book, Justice on Both Sides. Co-sponsored by the Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor. 

Space is limited. To register, please contact Linda Taylor and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

This event is part of a rescheduled 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Associate Professor – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition and Dean’s Professor of Community Engagement - College of Arts and Sciences; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Abuelas: Ancestral Ways for Future Generations

Sep 15, 2020, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Denice Frohman (University of Arizona)

Artist, Frohman joins La Casita director, Tere Paniagua and members of Syracuse University’s Puerto Rican Student Association for a virtual exhibit launch of “Abuelas” (Grandmothers), celebrating the start of Latinx/Hispanic Heritage Month, 2020. Student narratives examine soaring waves of social and behavioral changes through the lens of the matriarchal figure as Frohman reads selections from her body of work inspired by her abuela.

Latina elders—abuelas—steer the next generation toward embracing its ancestry. The role of this matriarch is seen as key to the preservation of culture, family history and language. The Abuelas project encourages visitors to make connections, discover and share personal stories, exploring concepts related to their own identity and history through photos, letters, family keepsakes, art, poetry and meaningful pieces of a past that shapes us personally, professionally, ideologically and spiritually. Program runs through March 2021.

[Photo credit: Benjamin Lzicar]

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

Click to participate


Additional supporters:

  • Latino-Latin American Studies Program (College of Arts & Sciences)
  • Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA, Maxwell School)
  • Languages, Literatures & Linguistics, Spanish Program (LLL)
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • Puerto Rican Student Association
  • La LUCHA Student Organization
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Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods

Sep 18, 2020, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Virtual Event

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Winn offers a workshop on equity-oriented, justice-seeking research in the humanities, focusing on listening, storytelling, and acting with and through communities.

Space is limited. To register, please contact Linda Taylor and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

This event is part of a rescheduled 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Associate Professor – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition and Dean’s Professor of Community Engagement - College of Arts and Sciences; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Abuelitas (Little Grandmas): Children’s Book Release

Sep 18, 2020, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM

Virtual Event

La Casita celebrates Latinx/Hispanic Heritage Month with the release of a new bilingual children’s book, written and illustrated by the young participants in their dual language literacy programs. As a companion project to La Casita's current exhibit, "Abuelas; Ancestral Ways for Future Generations," this fourth annual children's book release contains short personal reflections and illustrations depicting the strong bonds between children and their grandmothers, memories of cherished experiences that shape who they are, and who they will become.

Email La Casita for additional information.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Latino-Latin American Studies Program (College of Arts & Sciences)
  • Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA, Maxwell School)
  • Languages, Literatures & Linguistics, Spanish Program (LLL)
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • Puerto Rican Student Association
  • La LUCHA Student Organizations
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

18th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: Opening Night

Sep 24, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Coded Bias by Shalini Kantayya
(USA, 2020, captioned in English)

The Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival opens its 18th year with Kantayya's captivating new release.

Modern society sits at the intersection of two crucial questions: What does it mean when artificial intelligence increasingly governs our liberties? And what are the consequences for the people AI is biased against? When MIT Media Lab researcher Joy Buolamwini discovers that most facial-recognition software does not accurately identify darker-skinned faces and the faces of women, she delves into an investigation of widespread bias in algorithms. As it turns out, artificial intelligence is not neutral, and women are leading the charge to ensure our civil rights are protected.

Film will be available to stream for 24-hours only, on this listed date. Then join a live "Zoom" Q&A at 8:00 p.m. with filmmaker Shalini Kantayya.

Instructions for access will be posted soon at the festival website.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • The Newhouse School
  • Anthropology
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Democratizing Knowledge
  • English
  • Falk School
  • Geography
  • History
  • International Relations
  • Latino-Latin American Studies Program
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • LGBT Studies Program
  • Native American Studies Program
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • PARCC
  • Political Science
  • Religion
  • School of Education
  • Sociology
  • South Asia Center
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Disability Cultural Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

18th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Sep 24, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

The Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival celebrates its 18th year showcasing groundbreaking documentaries about human rights and social justice around the world.

Each film below will be available to stream for 24-hours only, on the date listed. Then join live "Zoom" Q&As with the filmmakers each evening at 8 p.m.

Thursday, September 24
Coded Bias by Shalini Kantayya
(USA, 2020, captioned in English)
MIT researcher Joy Buolamwini discovers that facial recognition technology does not see dark-skinned faces accurately, inspiring her journey to push for the first-ever legislation in the U.S. to govern against bias in the algorithms that impact us all.

Friday, September 25
Landfall by Cecilia Aldarondo
(USA, 2020, Spanish with English subtitles)
Through shard-like glimpses of everyday life in post-Hurricane María Puerto Rico, Landfall reassembles a ruined world at the brink of transformation.

Saturday, September 26
Yeh Freedom Life by Priya Sen
(India, 2018, Hindi with English subtitles)
Witness the queer lives of three people in working-class South Delhi as they seek to build futures outside of the constant scrutiny and sanction of society and family.

Instructions for access will be posted soon at the festival website.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • The Newhouse School
  • Anthropology
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Democratizing Knowledge
  • English
  • Falk School
  • Geography
  • History
  • International Relations
  • Latino-Latin American Studies Program
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • LGBT Studies Program
  • Native American Studies Program
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • PARCC
  • Political Science
  • Religion
  • School of Education
  • Sociology
  • South Asia Center
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Disability Cultural Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

18th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Sep 25, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

Landfall by Cecilia Aldarondo
(USA, 2020, Spanish with English subtitles)
Through shard-like glimpses of everyday life in post-Hurricane María Puerto Rico, Landfall reassembles a ruined world at the brink of transformation.

Film will be available to stream for 24-hours only, on this listed date. Then join a live "Zoom" Q&A at 8:00 p.m. with filmmaker, Cecilia Aldarondo.

Instructions for access will be posted soon at the festival website.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • The Newhouse School
  • Anthropology
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Democratizing Knowledge
  • English
  • Falk School
  • Geography
  • History
  • International Relations
  • Latino-Latin American Studies Program
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • LGBT Studies Program
  • Native American Studies Program
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • PARCC
  • Political Science
  • Religion
  • School of Education
  • Sociology
  • South Asia Center
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Disability Cultural Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

18th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: Closing Night

Sep 26, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Yeh Freedom Life by Priya Sen
(India, 2018, 70 min., Hindi with English subtitles)

Filmed over the course of a year in Ambedkar Nagar, a dense, largely working-class area in South Delhi, Yeh Freedom Life moves between the two very different worlds of its protagonists, Sachi and Parveen, and tries to keep up with the currents and swings of their respective loves. Sachi works at a local beauty parlor; Parveen runs the family’s small cigarette counter at a crowded intersection. They are surrounded by a cacophonous city; they are both in love with other women. The film accompanies them through their desire to find and live, according to Sachi, their “freedom lives”–lives that are outside of the constant scrutiny and sanction of society and family. But this “freedom life” also leaves them vulnerable to the precariousness of love, when it refuses such constraints.

Film will be available to stream for 24-hours only, on this listed date. Then join a live "Zoom" Q&A at 8:00 p.m. with filmmaker, Priya Sen.

Instructions for access will be posted soon at the festival website.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • The Newhouse School
  • Anthropology
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Democratizing Knowledge
  • English
  • Falk School
  • Geography
  • History
  • International Relations
  • Latino-Latin American Studies Program
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • LGBT Studies Program
  • Native American Studies Program
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • PARCC
  • Political Science
  • Religion
  • School of Education
  • Sociology
  • South Asia Center
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Disability Cultural Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

An Evening with Nikole Hannah-Jones

Oct 8, 2020, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

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Nikole Hannah-Jones (New York Times)

University Lectures and the Humanities Center welcome Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist and creator of the groundbreaking 1619 Project, which examines slavery’s legacies and highlights Black Americans’ contributions to the nation.

[Photo credit: James Enslin, New York Times]

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

(Dis)ability Futures and Indigeneity: Critical Epistemologies for Social Change

Oct 22, 2020, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Hilary Weaver (University at Buffalo)

In mainstream societies, disabilities are perceived frequently as deficits, emboldened by values borne out of colonization. This public lecture by Weaver instead draws on traditional indigenous understandings, wisdom, and knowledges to answer vital questions. What can the United States and the rest of the world learn to change our future, by making disabilities and other differences understandable, without applying a deficit model? The future does not need to be as hierarchical as the present.

RSVP by Oct. 17 to receive link to event.

Image descriptions, American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation, and live captioning will be provided. Please indicate any other accommodations requests when RSVPing.

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

Click to participate


Additional supporters:

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Medicine Wheel as a Framework for Understanding Disabilities: Informing Our Future Thinking, Informing Our Future Actions

Oct 23, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual Event

Hilary Weaver (University at Buffalo)

The Medicine Wheel is a powerful symbol for many Native Americans and it contains many layers of meaning. Through this workshop, Weaver explores how components of the Medicine Wheel can be used to understand traditional Indigenous ideas about disabilities. Participants will engage with relevant Native American teachings and interpretations to understand how they can inform our understanding of different abilities of Mind, Body, Spirit, and Heart. Discussion focuses on how we can work toward change, both for individuals and on a large scale, to reduce stigma and “othering,” toward a better future in our shared world.

RSVP by Oct. 16 to receive link to event.

Image descriptions, American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation, and live captioning will be provided. Please indicate any other accommodations requests when RSVPing.

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

Click to participate


Additional supporters:

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

A Dream of A New Past

Oct 29, 2020, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

Philip Metres (John Carroll University)

Acclaimed poet, Metres, is a Guggenheim Fellow and professor of English and director of the Peace, Justice, and Human Rights program at John Carroll University. He will read from his latest collection of poems, Shrapnel Maps, centered on the Israel/Palestine conflict, illustrating both the possibility and challenge of moving toward a peaceful future.

RSVP by Oct. 28 to receive event link.

This is event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

Click to participate

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Writing into the Wounds

Oct 30, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Virtual Event

Philip Metres (John Carroll University)

Discussing his own work, Metres has said, “I believe that poetry can be a technology to help remember the past, but not be suffocated by it. To listen to the ancestors in the spirit world, but not worship them or be imprisoned by them. A technology to dream the future, but not be destroyed by it. To remember what we have not yet known.”

In this writer's mini-seminar, Metres focuses on these ideas, and the important work poetry can do. The session will be moderated by poet and Downtown Writers Center director Philip Memmer.

RSVP by Oct. 28 to receive event link.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

Click to participate

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Using Art for Transformative Teaching (Fall Workshop)

Nov 6, 2020, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

This virtual workshop challenges participants to think about the future of teaching in a highly visual world. Technology in the 21st-century bombards us with images on our many screens, and yet, visual literacy (that is, the ability to critically look at an image and understand why it leads you to have certain thoughts or emotions), is not something that is taught across all disciplines.

The Syracuse University Art Museum houses 45,000 artworks that capture moments in history from antiquity to present, providing countless opportunities to discuss everything from the materiality of pigments in ancient art to the Black Lives Movement in contemporary artwork.

RSVP by Nov. 2 to receive event link.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Surrender as Method, Subject, and Experience: Doing the Work that Undoes Us

Nov 10, 2020, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Virtual Event

Jessica Restaino (Montclair State University)

In her award winning book Surrender: Feminist Rhetoric and Ethics in Love and Illness, Restaino takes up a two-year ethnography project with friend and collaborator Susan Lundy Maute, through the last two years of Maute’s life with terminal breast cancer. This public lecture introduces a series of core concepts from Surrender: “cut pieces,” which can represent messy and destabilized researcher-writer subjectivities and the uncertain texts produced when we are engaged with work that overwhelms us; “misfit tools,” which are rhetorical guide posts for identifying methods that disrupt traditional expectations for how and why we do our work; and finally “love” as a (difficult) concept that has a necessary place in research and writing work that pushes our most deeply-held boundaries.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Health Humanities Integrated Learning Major
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In Process and Collaboration: A Shared Snapshot of Co-Ethnography in Medical Practice

Nov 11, 2020, 1:30 PM-3:00 PM

Virtual Event

Jessica Restaino (Montclair State University)
Damali Campbell-Oparaji MD (University Hospital-Newark, NJ)

Restaino and Campbell-Oparaji discuss their ongoing collaboration on a range of issues: race, gender, and mental health biases in medicine; the complex work of medical education, its traditions and hierarchies; the physician as subject (family life; professional status; intersectional identities); and the complexities of collaboration, including Restaino’s status as non-medical expert as well as her own intersectional identities. Campbell-Oparaji and Restaino talk about how they’ve framed their work (so far); what sorts of questions, challenges, and innovations have emerged; and their sense of the need for writing about and through the experience of medical practice. The closing segment of this workshop invites participants' questions and comments about their own collaborative challenges.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Health Humanities Integrated Learning Major
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Rewriting History

Nov 12, 2020, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Fabiola Jean-Louis
Tanisha Jackson (Syracuse University-CFAC)
Yvonne Buchanan (Syracuse University-VPA)
Shana Gelin (Syracuse University-OMA)

In celebration of Point of Contact Gallery's concurrent exhibition by multi media artist, Fabiola Jean-Louis, this panel discussion delves into Jean-Louis’ body of work, which addresses complicated layers of self-awareness and what makes up the historical truths we have been taught to accept about race and the roles of women, both past and present.

Jean-Louis' art questions and thereby magnifies the injustice of the foundational structure of our society while implicitly asking the viewer to make a change. In this way, Rewriting History engages with a vision of the future – one of resilience, and justice. Our understanding of history is malleable and through its continual questioning, we are able to change the trajectory of the future.

Event link coming soon.

Exhibit runs Sept. 4 - Nov. 20, viewable by appointment. Email Point of Contact Gallery to schedule a visit or call 315-443-2169.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences
  • Syracuse University Coalition of Museum and Art Centers (CMAC)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In the Bush: Writings by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

Feb 24, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Join discussion of selected readings by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson—an indigenous writer, musician and scholar—to include the article, “Land as Pedagogy,” and the forthcoming "Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies," as suggested additional reading.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Biidaaban: The Dawn Comes (film screening)

Feb 25, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Amanda Strong’s animated short, Biidaaban, interprets Leanne Betasamosake Simpson's writings about reclaiming the First Nations ceremony of maple sap harvesting. (Viewable on demand, through March.)

Then join Strong and Simpson for virtual Q&A on March 4 about their work.

Video link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Remembering for the Future: An Historical Intervention by the Narratio Fellows

Feb 26, 2021, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

This virtual discussion with visuals by Ana Maria Vîjdea (Transmedia-Film MFA student) showcases works by this year's North Side Learning Center Narratio Fellows.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Biidaaban: Indigenous Knowledges, Resistance, and Resilience

Mar 4, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and Amanda Strong answer your questions about the film Biidaaban, maple sugaring, Indigenous resurgence and rematriation.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Future of New Plays

Mar 23, 2021, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM

Virtual Event

Kyle Bass
Kate Hamill
Chesney Snow
Evan Starling-Davis

In this virtual panel discussion, playwrights Bass, Hamill, Snow, and Starling-Davis preview this year's Syracuse Stage "Cold Reads Festival of New Plays" (March 24-28) with discussion about how creative artists envision and write for the future.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Sugarbush Futures: Traditional Foodways and Learning from the Trees

Mar 24, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Virtual Event

Robin Wall Kimmerer (SUNY ESF)

Rounding out a spring series of readings, a film screening of Biidaaban, and conversation on Indigenous knowledge, Women's & Gender Studies hosts a video debut of a maple-tapping demonstration by Native ecologist Robin Wall Kimmerer.

Video link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Future of Teaching is... Visual!

Mar 25, 2021, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

Gustafson presents a public lecture on different pathways to foster interdisciplinary discussions of non-verbal and non-narrative communication in art through observation, analysis, historical context, emotional and/or aesthetic appeal.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Race, Space, and the Environment

Mar 26, 2021, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Virtual Event

An interdisciplinary, interactive multimedia symposium brings together scholars and professionals from Syracuse and South Africa to investigate the intersections of race and the environment, and impacts of climate change on marginalized and racialized populations.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Using Art for Transformative Teaching (Spring Workshop)

Apr 5, 2021, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

This virtual workshop challenges participants to think about the future of teaching in a highly visual world. Technology in the 21st-century bombards us with images on our many screens, and yet, visual literacy (that is, the ability to critically look at an image and understand why it leads you to have certain thoughts or emotions), is not something that is taught across all disciplines.

The Syracuse University Art Museum houses 45,000 artworks that capture moments in history from antiquity to present, providing countless opportunities to discuss everything from the materiality of pigments in ancient art to the Black Lives Movement in contemporary artwork.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Pushing Boundaries: Art as Activism in a Changing South Asia

Apr 9, 2021, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Virtual Event

A panel of scholars, artists, and activists working in South Asia explore art as a form of resistance against oppression to imagine a more equitable future.

Following a short break, this group of scholars hosts a more interactive virtual workshop for artists interested in forms of creative activism.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making Change: A Workshop on Activism through Art

Apr 9, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

Virtual Event

Participants explore use of photography, documentary film, painting, writing, and other art forms as instruments of activism.

This workshop acts as an interactive "part 2," following a morning panel discussion by guest scholars.

Registration link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In Succession: Black Vernacular Genealogies of Movement and Being Moved

Apr 15, 2021, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Steffani Jemison (Rutgers University)

Urban Video Project hosts a specially streamed performance, screening, and Q&A with multimedia artist Steffani Jemison.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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