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The Humanities Ph.D. and the Work of the 21st Century

Sep 14, 2018, 9:30 AM-10:45 AM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

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Teresa Mangum (University of Iowa)

What would Ph.D. programs in the humanities look like if our goals were to give students good reasons to pursue graduate humanities degrees and to give employers good reasons to hire Ph.D. graduates? Drawing from over a decade of experience with the Obermann Graduate Institute on Engagement and the Academy, the National Humanities Alliance, and Imagining America, Mangum discusses the ways graduate programs across the country are integrating familiar forms of scholarly research and writing with career skills gained through applied practice. Coffee and light snacks will be available.

To request accessibility accommodations, please contact humcenter@syr.edu by September 6.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Voces en Exilio (Voices in Exile)

Sep 20, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

(Doors open at 6:30) LaCasita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco Street, Syracuse

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José "Peppie" Calvar (Setnor School of Music)
Hendricks Chapel Choir

This program commemorating Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 is the premiere performance of original music for choir and Caribbean percussion composed by José “Peppie” Calvar, Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Choral Activities at the Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University, and director of the Hendricks Chapel Choir.

Many have been moved by the number of Puerto Ricans -- including those with Syracuse connections -- whose lives were disrupted by Hurricane María (September, 2017). Although hope abounds that life-as-usual will someday be restored there, many displaced families have no immediate plans to return to Puerto Rico. This story resonates deeply with Calvar, a first-generation American of Cuban descent, whose family, under a different set of circumstances, was exiled from its homeland. The music and text touches on the suffering of the Puerto Rican people and the need to restore critical infrastructure to the island, while also serving as a celebration of the outpouring of support many displaced Puerto Ricans have received from fellow Americans living on the mainland.
 
The all-student Hendricks Chapel Choir performs two public performances as part of their Fall '18 curriculum -- this date at La Casita, and September 23rd as part of the weekly Dean's Convocation in Hendricks Chapel.

This activity is largely musical, with only brief spoken remarks. To request ASL or any other accessibility accommodation, please contact Luz Trilla (315-443-2151) by September 6.


Additional supporters:
1. Latino-Latin American Studies Program
2. Office of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community 
3. College of Arts & Sciences
4. Art & Music Histories

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Demographic Aging in Japan and Beyond

Sep 22, 2018, 10:00 AM-4:00 PM

500 Hall of Languages

Sawako Shirahase (Tokyo University)
Mary Brinton (Harvard University)
Ito Peng (University of Toronto)

Demographic aging is one of the most serious policy challenges all advanced industrial societies face today. This event focuses on Japan — a country experiencing the most dramatic demographic aging — to explore how factors such as gender ideology, gender relations and tolerance for diversity deeply affect the demographic sustainability of our societies.

Additional supporters:

  • Japan Foundation
  • Moynihan Institute
  • College of Arts & Sciences
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

A Contemplative View of Human Resilience

Sep 23, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

(Doors open at 6:30) Hendricks Chapel

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José "Peppie" Calvar (Setnor School of Music)
Hendricks Chapel Choir

This encore performance of "Voces en Exilio" at Dean’s Convocation in Hendricks Chapel features original music and reflection from diverse religious, spiritual, and philosophical perspectives. This original composition by José “Peppie” Calvar, performed by the all-student Hendricks Chapel Choir pays tribute to displaced hurricane victims and human resilience.

Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART) will be provided.


Additional supporters:
1. Latino-Latin American Studies Program
2. Office of Cultural Engagement for the Hispanic Community 
3. College of Arts & Sciences
4. Art & Music Histories

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Fear No Lit Writing Workshop

Sep 24, 2018, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

002 Bird Library

Erin Dorney (Mankato, MN)
Tyler Barton (Mankato, MN)

Dorney and Barton, co-founders Fear No Lit, a literary organization based in Minnesota, lead this public workshop for interested writers, co-presented by SU Libraries and Colgate University Library. Space is limited; please RSVP to Patrick Williams by Sept. 17 and include any accessibility requests.

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SU Libraries / Colgate University Library Small Press Reading Series

Sep 24, 2018, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Erin Dorney (Mankato, MN)
Tyler Barton (Mankato, MN)
Patrick Parks (Chicago, IL)

Poet Erin Dorney, author of I Am Not Famous Anymore (Mason Jar Press, 2018), fiction writer Tyler Barton, author of Get Empty (Split Lip Press, forthcoming), and novelist Patrick Parks, author of Tucumcari (Kernpunkt Press, 2018) will each read from their work as part of the Syracuse University Libraries/Colgate University Libraries Small Press Reading Series.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Tango and Borges

Sep 25, 2018, 6:45 PM-9:30 PM

Goldstein Auditorium, Schine Student Center

Milton Loayza (SUNY Oswego)
Seth Sealfon (Rochester, NY)
Evan Meccarello (Nazareth College)

This bilingual (Spanish/English) performance combines literature, music, and dance to introduce the audience to one of Argentina’s most popular writers and to the country’s most exciting genre of music and dance. Actor-singer Loayza joins musicians Sealfon and Meccarello in bringing this presentation to life.

Additional supporters:

  • Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA)
  • Latino/Latin American Studies Program (LLAS)
  • CNY Humanities Corridor (Working Groups LELAC and LLAAB, LLC20)
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Archival Methods and Ethics for Recovering Missing Texts

Sep 26, 2018, 2:15 PM-3:35 PM

Location T.B.A.

Roslyn Knutson (University of Arkansas, Little Rock)

Knutson's work focuses on ethical and practical aspects of recovering lost textual artifacts through archival research. Her primary research focuses the repertory of Shakespeare’s playing company with particular emphasis on Shakespeare’s lost plays. This sort of recovery work is familiar to many scholars across the humanities whose research entails creating fresh readings of existing texts, discovering new documents, and working to trace and recover the full body of work produced by an author or a people. While this sort of work is most often associated with Literature and Writing scholars, it is also frequently undertaken by scholars from Women’s and Gender Studies, Religious Studies, Ethnic Studies, and other Humanities disciplines.

Additional supporters:

  • English & Textual Studies
  • Medieval Renaissance Studies
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

16th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Sep 27, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Screening times and locations vary

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Human rights and social justice issues are explored through an international selection of documentaries and dramatic features. Featured screenings include:

For a complete schedule and additional details as they develop, visit suhrff.syr.edu.

Download the festival poster.


FESTIVAL CO-SPONSORS:

B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; School of Education; Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics; Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program; International Relations Program; Latino-Latin American Studies Program; Native American and Indigenous Studies Program; Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), Disability Cultural Center; LGBT Resource Center; South Asia Center

FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS:

Department of Art and Music Histories; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Religion; Department of Sociology; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Asian/Asian American Studies Program; LGBT Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; SASSE: Students Advocating Safe Sex and Empowerment

NOTE: Films will be screened with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2018.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Sentence

Sep 27, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Opening Night: 16th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival [6:30pm - Reception]

Rudy Valdez (USA)

Drawing from hundreds of hours of footage, filmmaker Rudy Valdez shows the aftermath of his sister Cindy’s 15-year sentence for conspiracy charges related to crimes committed by her deceased ex-boyfriend—something known, in legal terms, as “the girlfriend problem.” Valdez’s method of coping with this tragedy is to film his sister’s family for her, both the everyday details and the milestones—moments Cindy herself can no longer share in. But in the midst of this nightmare, Valdez finds his voice as both a filmmaker and activist, and he and his family begin to fight for Cindy’s release during the last months of the Obama administration’s clemency initiative. Whether their attempts will allow Cindy to break free of her draconian sentence becomes the aching question at the core of this deeply personal portrait of a family in crisis. Valdez participates in a post-screening Q&A.

(85 minutes, captioned in English)

Visit the festival website for complete schedules and addition details as they develop.


FESTIVAL CO-SPONSORS:

B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; School of Education; Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics; Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program; International Relations Program; Latino-Latin American Studies Program; Native American and Indigenous Studies Program; Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), Disability Cultural Center; LGBT Resource Center; South Asia Center

FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS:

Department of Art and Music Histories; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Religion; Department of Sociology; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Asian/Asian American Studies Program; LGBT Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; SASSE: Students Advocating Safe Sex and Empowerment

NOTE: Films will be screened with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2018.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

On Her Shoulders

Sep 28, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

16th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Alexandria Bombach (USA)

At only twenty-three years old, Nadia Murad’s life is a dizzying array of important undertakings—from giving testimony before the U.N. Security Council to visiting refugee camps to soul-bearing media interviews, emotionally draining speeches and an endless succession of one-on-one meetings with top government officials. Though it all takes an enormous toll, this once ordinary girl has survived the 2014 genocide of the Yazidis in Northern Iraq and escaped sexual slavery at the hands of ISIS to become a relentless beacon of hope for her people. With deep compassion and a formal precision and elegance that matches Nadia’s calm and steely demeanor, filmmaker Alexandria Bombach follows this strong-willed young woman, who once dreamed of opening a beauty salon in her village, as she fights to bring ISIS to justice and save her people from extinction.

(94 minutes, English, Kurdish, and Arabic with English subtitles)

Visit the festival website for complete schedules and addition details as they develop.


FESTIVAL CO-SPONSORS:

B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; School of Education; Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics; Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program; International Relations Program; Latino-Latin American Studies Program; Native American and Indigenous Studies Program; Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), Disability Cultural Center; LGBT Resource Center; South Asia Center

FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS:

Department of Art and Music Histories; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Religion; Department of Sociology; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Asian/Asian American Studies Program; LGBT Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; SASSE: Students Advocating Safe Sex and Empowerment

NOTE: Films will be screened with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2018.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Call Her Ganda

Sep 29, 2018, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

16th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

PJ Raval (USA)

When Jennifer Laude, a Filipina transwoman, is brutally murdered by a U.S. Marine, three women intimately invested in the case—an activist attorney (Virgie Suarez), a transgender journalist (Meredith Talusan) and Jennifer’s mother (Julita “Nanay” Laude)—galvanize a political uprising, pursuing justice and taking on the hardened legacies of US imperialism, including the Visiting Forces Agreement, which allows U.S. military personnel stationed in the country to remain under U.S. jurisdiction. Fusing personal tragedy, human rights activism and the little known history, and complex aftermath, of U.S. imperial rule in the Philippines, Call Her Ganda illuminates how a brutal story of gendered violence against a trans woman became a geopolitical question of postcolonial national sovereignty.

(98 min, English and Tagalog with English Subtitles)

For a complete schedule and additional details as they develop, visit the festival website.


FESTIVAL CO-SPONSORS:

B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; School of Education; Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics; Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program; International Relations Program; Latino-Latin American Studies Program; Native American and Indigenous Studies Program; Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), Disability Cultural Center; LGBT Resource Center; South Asia Center

FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS:

Department of Art and Music Histories; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Religion; Department of Sociology; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Asian/Asian American Studies Program; LGBT Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; SASSE: Students Advocating Safe Sex and Empowerment

NOTE: Films will be screened with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2018.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

I Dream in Another Language

Sep 29, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

16th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Ernesto Contreras (Mexico / Netherlands)

Winning the World Cinema Audience Award at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, I Dream in Another Language is a poetic reflection on life and long-lost love. After the death of elderly village matriarch Jacinta, only two speakers of a Mexican indigenous language remain. Visiting linguistic researcher Martín is tasked with documenting this language to save it from extinction. The only catch is the two remaining speakers of this dying language, Evaristo and Isauro, haven’t spoken in over 50 years. To ensure the survival of their language and honour Jacinta’s memory, the two men must revisit painful memories that tore them apart. In this rumination on love, director Ernesto Contreras offers us a truly immersive cinematic experience on the importance of language, communication and stories. 

(104 minutes, Spanish and Zikril with English subtitles)

For a complete schedule and addition details as they develop, visit the festival website.


FESTIVAL CO-SPONSORS:

B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; School of Education; Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics; Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program; International Relations Program; Latino-Latin American Studies Program; Native American and Indigenous Studies Program; Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), Disability Cultural Center; LGBT Resource Center; South Asia Center

FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS:

Department of Art and Music Histories; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Religion; Department of Sociology; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Asian/Asian American Studies Program; LGBT Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; SASSE: Students Advocating Safe Sex and Empowerment

NOTE: Films will be screened with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2018.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

White Sun

Sep 29, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

Closing Night: 16th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Deepak Rauniyar (Nepal / USA / Quatar / Netherlands)

As Nepal’s official selection for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, Deepak Rauniyar’s second feature sensitively explores the damage done to the fabric of Nepalese society by the decade-long civil war between the Maoists and Nepal’s monarchical government. On the occasion of his father’s funeral, Chandra returns to the village he left years earlier to join the Maoists and finds himself united with the daughter he never met and revisiting uneasy relations with family members and neighbors. Past traumas return and cause tensions to boil over. Finding the political within the everyday, White Sun uses one village’s complex tribulations to speak to an entire national history.

(89 minutes, Nepali with English subtitles)

For a complete schedule and addition details as they develop, visit the festival website.


FESTIVAL CO-SPONSORS:

B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; School of Education; Department of Languages, Literature and Linguistics; Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program; International Relations Program; Latino-Latin American Studies Program; Native American and Indigenous Studies Program; Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), Disability Cultural Center; LGBT Resource Center; South Asia Center

FESTIVAL SUPPORTERS:

Department of Art and Music Histories; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Religion; Department of Sociology; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Asian/Asian American Studies Program; LGBT Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Office of Multicultural Affairs; SASSE: Students Advocating Safe Sex and Empowerment

NOTE: Films will be screened with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2018.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CREATE: Art, Act, Eat

Oct 4, 2018, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Watson Theater

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Seitu Jones (St. Paul, MN)

The stories we tell ourselves about food are often disconnected from the realm of art and activism. In this Syracuse Symposium talk -- which is also part of the Visiting Artist Lecture Series (VALS) -- Jones explains his work that brings these disparate themes together. From collard green bus stop sculptures and bread ovens, to 2,000-person dinner tables and “greenlining” projects, Jones discusses how food and activism flavor his public art projects and how these elements help craft new stories about community.

Additional supporters:

  • Brady Farm
  • The Canary Lab in Transmedia
  • Food Studies Program, Falk College
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Recipe as Story: Exploring the Meaning of Food and Art on a Community Farm

Oct 6, 2018, 2:00 PM-4:30 PM

Brady Farm, 150 Ford Avenue, Syracuse

a photo related to the event

Seitu Jones (St. Paul, MN)

Internationally-renowned artist Seitu Jones leads a hands-on workshop on community-based art and the value of food. Participants share stories about food in their own lives and then make those stories into stencil designs. These stencils will then be used as artwork on Brady Farm, expressing the values of the farm and welcoming community. All ages welcome.  Participants will also receive a digital file of their stencil. The “art” of this event is not only the stencils but the conversation that occurs.

Please RSVP by September 25 to Edward Morris.

Additional supporters:

  • Brady Farm
  • The Canary Lab in Transmedia
  • Food Studies Program, Falk College
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Conversation with Mexican Film Director, Carlos Rossini

Oct 8, 2018, 12:45 PM-2:00 PM

341 Eggers (tentative)

Carlos Rossini (Mexico City)

Acclaimed Mexican cineaste and documentary film maker Rossini discusses documentary film-making in Latin America. Several of his films have focused on immigration, the environment, and political corruption in Latin America and beyond, including The Other Side of the Wall; Guerrero; Cloud Forest; El alcalde; and El ciruelo.

Additional supporters:

  • Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA)
  • Latino/Latin American Studies Program (LLAS) = $400
  • CNY Humanities Corridor (Working Group LLC12: LELACS)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Look Now: Facing Breast Cancer (Opening Reception and Exhibit)

Oct 11, 2018, 6:00 PM-9:00 PM

Point of Contact Gallery, 350 W. Fayette Street, Syracuse

a photo related to the eventMulti-media exhibit shares personal stories of cancer survivors.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Sacred Landscape, Secular Law: Storying Spirituality on American Public Lands

Oct 12, 2018, 3:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Nicolas Howe (Williams College)

Geographer and environmental studies scholar Nicolas Howe discusses the idea of spirituality and how it has shaped public discourse about sacred space in modern America. Focusing on legal conflicts over sacred sites and iconic wilderness areas, he shows how dominant stories about the nature of ‘spiritual experience’ have enabled courts to routinely deny land claims that threaten secular assumptions about the material agency of place—assumptions paradoxically rooted in the country’s still-dominant Protestant religious imaginary.

Howe's lecture concludes with a reception, presented as part of this semester's Symposium course, "Geography of Religion" (GEO 300).

Additional Supporters:

  • Geography
  • Religion
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Stories in the Blood: Slave Narratives and Identity in Contemporary American Theatre

Oct 21, 2018, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee Street, Syracuse

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Christian DuComb (Colgate University)
John Ernest
(Delaware University)
Joan Bryant (Syracuse University)
Kyle Bass (Playwright, Syracuse Stage)
Tazwell Thompson (Director, Syracuse Stage)

This free, public panel discussion features educators, scholars, and artists whose work reflects the importance of storytelling identities in the American narrative. This dialogue and audience Q&A session is open to community-wide audiences interested in exploring questions raised by the Syracuse Stage world premiere production of Possessing Harriet. [Performance tickets sold separately.]

Live, visceral and immediate, theatre is the most powerful art form we have with which to enact, investigate, and interrogate the past and the present, and to imagine the future. Theatre asks powerful and necessary questions of its audience and its practitioners. Engagement with public scholarship about cultures, art and histories enriches an entire community-faculty, students and general community alike-whose understandings about the human condition are challenged and deepened through the experience of live theatre, its depictions of human experience, and the necessary dialogues it brings us to.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Authority and Utility in Spinoza: From Epicureanism to Neoliberalism?

Oct 23, 2018, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Tolley 304

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Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator

Dimitris Vardoulakis (Western Sydney University)

Vardoulakis discusses his pre-circulated paper arguing that Spinoza is influenced by epicureanism. This is evident particularly in the conflict between authority—understood as the kind of figure that is impervious to argumentation—and the calculation of utility (phronesis) that is the precondition of action. This conflict is complex because in certain circumstances we may calculate that it is to our utility to allow a person in authority to calculate on our behalf. The paper indicates, in addition, that the way Spinoza constructs the relation between authority and utility can inform our political predicament today. Spinoza may offer an alternative to populism as to why we have political figures who lack authority. And his thinking on utility could help us reconsider instrumentality in the neoliberal age.

RSVP to Aimee Germain by Oct. 15; include any accessibility requests.


Biography: Dimitris Vardoulakis is the deputy chair of Philosophy at Western Sydney University. He is the author of The Doppelgänger: Literature’s Philosophy (2010), Sovereignty and its Other: Toward the Dejustification of Violence (2013), Freedom from the Free Will: On Kafka’s Laughter (2016), and Stasis Before the State: Nine Theses on Agonistic Democracy (2018). He has also edited or co-edited numerous books, including Spinoza Now (2011) and Spinoza’s Authority (2018). He is the director of “Thinking Out Loud: The Sydney Lectures in Philosophy and Society,” and the co-editor of the book series “Incitements” (Edinburgh University Press).

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

An Evening With...

Oct 25, 2018, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

University Lecture Series

Details coming soon!

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mama's Clothes: Visual Storytelling in the Photographs of Keisha Scarville

Nov 1, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Ellis Gallery, Light Work, 316 Waverly Avenue, Syracuse

Keisha Scarville (Brooklyn, NY)

This gallery talk doubles as an opening reception for Scarville's exhibit of provocative phography.  Exhibition runs through December 13. (Handicapped accessible and ASL available.)

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Keisha Scarville Portfolio Workshop

Nov 2, 2018, 3:00 PM-7:00 PM

Light Work, 316 Waverly Avenue

Keisha Scarville (Brooklyn, NY)

Syracuse University students, faculty, staff and Light Work lab members may register for one-on-one portfolio reviews with the photographer, exploring ideas of narrative structure, editing and content. Reviews are by appointment only and space is limited. To reserve a spot, please contact Mary Lee Hodgens by October 15th.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Odyssey: Stories of the Boat People

Nov 2, 2018, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Vietnamese composer Vân-Ánh Vanessa VÕ performs with Society for New Music all-stars.

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Language Acts and Worldmaking: Our Words Make Worlds

Nov 6, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

341 Eggers (tentative)

Sophie Stevens (King's College, London)

Stevens presents research from the UK-based humanities project, “Language Acts and Worldmaking ,” using as an example the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds. Dr. Stevens shows how the project proposes a more global approach to language teaching and learning as a way to foreground language’s power to continually shape how we live and make our worlds.

Additional supporters:

Centro de Estudios Hispánicos
Program on Latin America and the Caribbean
Latino/Latin American Studies

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“Disappeared” in Mexico: The Challenges of Feminist Legal Anthropology and the Crisis of Human Rights

Nov 6, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

309 Sims Hall

Rosalva Aída Hernández Castillo (CIESAS, Mexico City)

This talk focuses on the new challenges that arise in working with mothers´ of disappeared, a terrible phenomena experienced in Mexico, over the last decade. As a result of the so called "war on drugs," there are 30,000 young men and women who have been kidnapped and later killed by organized crime, in many cases with the participation of security forces. Hernandez-Castillo is part of an all women Forensic team working with mothers of the disappeared kids.

Additional supporters:

  • Women's & Gender Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies

 

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Slough Media

Nov 7, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

201 Little Hall, Colgate University

Rebecca Schneider (Brown University)

Schneider draws from her forthcoming essay, "Slough Media," to consider the entanglement of media and the body in deep time, questioning the binaries of ephemerality and endurance, obsolescence and persistence. Seminar participants will read a pre-circulated draft of "Slough Media," for discussion. Schneider is a performance and media theorist, whose publications include Performing Remains: Art and War in Times of Theatrical Reenactment (Routledge, 2011) and The Explicit Body in Performance (Routledge, 1997).

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Returning from Conflict: A Nonfiction Reading by the Syracuse Veterans’ Writing Group

Nov 8, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:30 PM

Goldstein Alumni and Faculty Center

A 5pm reception preceeds an evening of storytelling as local veterans bear witness to 50 years of military experiences.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Witkin & Witkin: Twin Stories of a Photographer and a Painter

Nov 13, 2018, 6:30 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

The organizers of the annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival host this public screening of Trisha Ziff’s double-portrait of Witkin brothers, Jerome (a Syracuse University Emeritus Professor) and his twin, Joel. A light reception preceeds the screening. Jerome is schduled to join the filmmaker for audience Q&A following the feature. 
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U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: Time for the Concerned Public to Intervene Again

Nov 29, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities for 2018 presented by Frank von Hippel

The last massive intervention by the concerned public in U.S. nuclear weapons policy was by the grassroots Nuclear Weapons Freeze Movement and its European counterpart in the early 1980s.  One result was to shift the U.S. government from insisting that the Soviet Union believed it possible to fight and win a nuclear war, and therefore so must we; to repeated joint summit statements by Presidents Gorbachev and Reagan that “nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought.”  More tangibly, the result was a reduction in the global stock of nuclear warheads from about 65,000 in 1991 to about 10,000 today.
 
The effect has worn off, however, and two separate but related nuclear arms races have begun: between the U.S. and Russia and the U.S. and China, plus proliferation crises with the “rogue” states, North Korea and Iran.
 
von Hippel will explain the perverse dynamics underlying these crises, discussing possible initiatives to mitigate them, such as a U.S. "no-first use" policy, restoration of limits on ineffective but provocative ballistic missile defenses, resumption of US-Russian nuclear reductions along with a cap on China’s nuclear buildup, and strengthening the nonproliferation regime with bans on the separation of plutonium and on national uranium enrichment capabilities.


Biography: Frank von Hippel is Senior Research Physicist and Professor of Public and International Affairs emeritus at Princeton University where, in 1975, he co-founded and co-chaired for three decades the Program on Science and Global Security. In 2006, he co-founded the International Panel on Fissile Materials and co-chaired it for its first nine years

During 1983-90, he worked with President Gorbachev’s advisor, Evgenyi Velikhov, to develop a number of successful initiatives to end nuclear testing, end the production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium for weapons, and eliminate excess weapons materials.

He has advised U.S. Administrations and Congress on nuclear security issues since the Carter Administration. During 1993-4, he served as Assistant Director for National Security in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and helped develop U.S.- Russian cooperative initiatives on nuclear threat reduction.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TENDER R/AGE :: RABIA TIERNA

Feb 21, 2019, 4:30 PM-5:30 PM

times and location T.B.D.

a photo related to the event

Adela Licona (University of Arizona)

This Syracuse Symposium keynote address is a call to action. NO CAGES. This multimodal interventionist art project begins in recognition that forced separation is not a new practice but one with a long and brutal history connected to colonization, slavery, internment, and imprisonment. Licona contextualizes and connects these histories to specific cruelties presently being enacted on migrant and refugee children and their families through forced separation at the US/Mexico border. This online and installation-ready project participates visually, textually, and sonically in a collective outcry against the caging of children and other migrants.

Biography:

Adela Licona is Associate Professor of English and Vice Chair of the GIDP in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory, is affiliated faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute of the Environment, and Mexican American Studies at the University of Arizona. Her research and teaching interests include space and visual rhetorics, cultural, ethnic, gender, and sexuality studies, race, borderlands studies, social justice media, environmental justice, feminist pedagogy, community literacies, action-oriented research and arts-based inquiry.

Licona’s photography has appeared in Versal; Edible Baja Magazine; TRIVIA; Proximities; Terrain; Kairos; Community Literacy; and The Rasp and the Wine. It has been exhibited in Tucson, Arizona, San Francisco, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. She was awarded a PLAYA Residency in Fall 2018.

Licona is co-editor of Feminist Pedagogy: Looking Back to Move Forward (JHUP, 2009), author of Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2012), and co-editor of Precarious Rhetorics (OSUP, forthcoming).

Licona co-directed the Crossroads Collaborative, a Ford Foundation-funded think-and-act research, writing, and teaching collective designed for action-oriented research on youth, sexuality, health, rights, and justice. With graduate students, she co-founded Feminist Action Research in Rhetoric, FARR, a group of progressive feminist scholars committed to public scholarship and community dialogue.

Licona served as Co-Chair of two National Women’s Studies Association Conferences (2015-16), is Editor Emeritus of Feminist Formations, and serves on advisory/editorial boards for QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, Feminist Formations, the Primavera Foundation, and the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam, a project of Spoken Futures.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

RELATE: A Workshop on Engaged Scholarship

Feb 22, 2019, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

times and location T.B.D.

Adela Licona (University of Arizona)

To complement her Syracuse Symposium keynote presentation, Licona leads this workshop of focused shared discussion. Participants will examine action-oriented, interdisciplinary approaches to community building and engagement through a relational, borderlands framework. The agenda also includes fostering collaboration, forging coalition, and enacting multiple methodologies to spark multidimensional imaginaries and bridge art.

To RSVP, contact humcenter@syr.edu by February 13 and include any accessibility requests.

Biography:

Adela Licona is Associate Professor of English and Vice Chair of the GIDP in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory, is affiliated faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute of the Environment, and Mexican American Studies at the University of Arizona. Her research and teaching interests include space and visual rhetorics, cultural, ethnic, gender, and sexuality studies, race, borderlands studies, social justice media, environmental justice, feminist pedagogy, community literacies, action-oriented research and arts-based inquiry.

Licona’s photography has appeared in Versal; Edible Baja Magazine; TRIVIA; Proximities; Terrain; Kairos; Community Literacy; and The Rasp and the Wine. It has been exhibited in Tucson, Arizona, San Francisco, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. She was awarded a PLAYA Residency in Fall 2018.

Licona is co-editor of Feminist Pedagogy: Looking Back to Move Forward (JHUP, 2009), author of Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2012), and co-editor of Precarious Rhetorics (OSUP, forthcoming).

Licona co-directed the Crossroads Collaborative, a Ford Foundation-funded think-and-act research, writing, and teaching collective designed for action-oriented research on youth, sexuality, health, rights, and justice. With graduate students, she co-founded Feminist Action Research in Rhetoric, FARR, a group of progressive feminist scholars committed to public scholarship and community dialogue.

Licona served as Co-Chair of two National Women’s Studies Association Conferences (2015-16), is Editor Emeritus of Feminist Formations, and serves on advisory/editorial boards for QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, Feminist Formations, the Primavera Foundation, and the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam, a project of Spoken Futures.

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Larry Blumenfeld: Watson Visiting Professor in Residency

Mar 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations vary

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

Through a two-week residency at Syracuse University as Watson Visiting Professor for 2019 , cultural journalist Larry Blumenfeld examines jazz as an aesthetic construct, a living culture, a language of many dialects, a personalized science and a framework for thought and action as related to social justice. Ignoring popular myths of jazz as “America’s classical music” and looking beyond concerns of style and genre, he focuses on the story of jazz culture in terms of both history and the current cultural landscape, and upon the music’s capacity to tell stories. In so doing, Blumenfeld draws on his 30 years of journalism and criticism; his deep immersion in the jazz cultures of New York, New Orleans and Havana; and his close working relationships and ongoing dialogues with celebrated musicians.

An updated schedule of Blumenfeld's daily activities will be posted as details develop.

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4th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2019, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date for our annual showcase celebrating books in the humanities by Syracuse University authors and editors, (copyright 2018).  More info will be posted as it develops!
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