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Upcoming Events

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

You are mine. I see now, I’m a have to let you go.

Sep 13, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

A Conversation with Suné Woods, Fred Moten and James Gordon Williams 

A lecture by artist Suné Woods is often referred to as a spoken word performance. Her work combines language, found imagery, moving images, and sound in multi-media formats.  A campus visit by poet Fred Moten is also scheduled to coincide with this engagement.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Processes of Translation: a Workshop in Photo Collage with Artist Suné Woods

Sep 16, 2017, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

Light Work Lab, 316 Waverly Avenue

Space for this Suné Woods workshop is limited.  To register, contact mlhodgen@syr.edu by September 8 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Poetry and Belonging: Readings by Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz

Sep 26, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

a photo related to the eventAcclaimed poets Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz have dealt with the idea of Belonging in interesting ways: Harrington through her unique explorations of the nursing home community, and the life of African American artist Horace H. Pippin; de la Paz through the themes of immigration and national/ethnic identity. Their reading will be followed by audience Q&A.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Working Between Worlds: Conversation with Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz

Sep 27, 2017, 9:00 AM-11:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Janice Harrington
Oliver de la Paz
Following public readings the night prior, poets Harrington and de la Paz meet with interested writers and readers in a small group setting. Please RSVP by September 20 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Sep 28, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

screenings in various locations

Celebrating its 15th year, the Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival adopts the mantra, "Through Film We Fight On!" Themes of “Belonging” weave throughout the program selections this year:

  • The coming-of-age documentary For Ahkeem examines how a Black teenage girl struggles to find a sense of belonging in US society where structural violence perpetuates racial injustice.
  • Memories of a Penitent Heart follows the filmmaker’s autobiographical journey to discover how her late gay uncle could only belong to her Puerto Rican family through denial and silence about his sexuality and his death from AIDS.
  • The Good Postman explores ethical issues of belonging on a national and local level as a small dying village in Bulgaria grapples with the influx of Syrian refugees from just across the Turkish border.
  • Plastic China investigates the discarded belongings of disposable consumer culture and how the economy of plastic waste defines the lives of a community of rural China.
  • And in Lipstick under My Burkha, four Indian women strive to resist the patriarchal imperative that women belong to men as they seek new modes of self-affirming belonging in the world.

The official SUHRFF website will be re-launched in August with updated information.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Belonging to the International: Gender, Sexuality, and Communist Identity During the Spanish Civil War

Sep 28, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum (West Chester University, PA)
As an official "Syracuse Symposium" course, the combination of US/LIT 400 (Revolution and the Avant-garde in Russia) with SPA 400 (Revolution: Cultural Responses in Spain) welcomes Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum, Professor of Russian History to present this public lecture, open to all.

Dr. Kirschenbaum’s talk will focus on communism as a way of life during the Spanish Civil War. She will explore how communist commitments shaped cultural and political identities as citizens sought to implement Soviet ideologies about class and gender. The incorporation of Communist iconography into Spanish daily life is read as transnational political solidarity during a time of national upheaval.

Kirschenbaum is the author of International Communism and the Spanish Civil War: Solidarity and Suspicion (Cambridge UP, 2015). This study won the Best Book by a Woman in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies awarded by The Association for Women in Slavic Studies.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Embodied Belongings: Exploring the Politics of ‘Queer’ in South Asia

Oct 5, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Vivek Shraya (Toronto)
Multidisciplinary South Asian artist Vivek Shraya will show and discuss a range of her work -- literature, song and film -- to highlight the complex relationship between belonging and the body itself.  Her work consistently tackles what it means to belong (and not belong) in relation to family, religion, community spaces, queerness and transness.

The following day -- Friday, October 6, 8:45 a.m.-7:30 p.m. -- South Asia Center presents Embodied Belongings Symposium: Exploring the Politics of ‘Queer’ in South Asia, as part of the Ray Smith Symposium and the Title VI NRC Consortium, in the Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Performing Change: Diaspora and Belonging

Oct 12, 2017, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Wafaa Bilal (New York University, Tisch School)
An internationally acclaimed artist, Bilal's interactive installations and creative performances encourage dialogue about questions of identity, exile, and American politics. Born in Iraq, Bilal’s 2007 installation Domestic Tension highlighted the corporeal impact of the US invasion of Iraq on Arab and Muslim Americans, raising questions about belonging that remain pertinent to today’s politics of exclusion.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Wafaa Bilal: On Art and Resistance

Oct 13, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Wafaa Bilal (New York University Tisch School)
As an Iraqi-born American, Bilal's artistic engagement with media, video, and design challenges the dominant steretoypes of the Middle East as a space dominated by war, or religion, and void of culture.  His works gives visibility to the region’s vast tradition of cultural production often under-represented, including on college campuses. The morning following his public talk, Bilal’s small-group session continues an important conversation on the relevance and role of artistic expression and the humanities in general in addressing issues of war trauma, violence, and diasporic belongings.  Please RSVP by Otober 4; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art and Architecture of That Day Now

Oct 24, 2017, 5:15 PM-7:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium and Marble Room

Keiko Ogura (Japan)
Naomi Itonaga (TV Hiroshima) tentative

Ms. Ogura is one of few remaining survivors exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion in 1945. Ever since that day, she has dedicated her life to sharing her experiences as a witness to world history. She taught herself to speak English so she could communicate with young Americans bound to shape future policies. The School of Architecture has organized this panel of artists and architects whose work grapples with difficult memories. This talk provides an opportunity for the Syracuse community to meet Ms. Ogura and to discuss a history we collectively constructed and to which we all belong. There will be an accompanying exhibit in the Slocum Hall gallery.

Other activities during Ogura's stay include a day-long symposium on the effects of the atomic bombs on post-WWII Japanese culture, set for Saturday, October 28th, hosted by the Languages, Literatures and Linguistics department and the Moynihan Institute.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs on Post-WWII Japanese Culture

Oct 28, 2017, 9:30 AM-6:00 PM

Slocum Auditorium

Keiko Ogura (Japan)
Naomi Itonaga (TV Hiroshima) tentative
Dr. Margarita Estevez-Abe (Syracuse University)
Dr. George Kallander (Syracuse University)
Dr. Brian Hurley (Syracuse University)
Yutaka Sho (Syracuse University)
Dr. Daisaku Yamamoto (Colgate University)
Dr. Chad Diehl (Loyola University) tentative
Rahna Reiko Rizzuto (author)
Dr. Sue Napier (Tufts University) tentative

Keiko Ogura is one of few remaining survivors exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion in 1945. Ever since that day, she has dedicated her life to sharing her experiences as a witness to world history. She taught herself to speak English so she could communicate with young Americans bound to shape future policies. This day-long symposium focuses on the effects of the atomic bombs on post-WWII Japanese culture, hosted by the Languages, Literatures and Linguistics department and the Moynihan Institute.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Where Have All the Alphabets Gone? Disappearing Traditional Writing Systems and the Worldwide Loss of Cultural Identity

Nov 3, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Tim Brookes (Champlain College)
A culture's sense of belonging is strongly affected by whether it has its own writing system, replete with local knowledge and beliefs, or whether it is forced to use one imported by a colonial / military / political / economic power. Brookes brings carvings and stories from a variety of cultures, especially the indigenous peoples of Bangladesh, to make this point abundantly -- and sometimes chillingly -- clear.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Enough with All These Border Walls: Redrawing Disciplinary Becoming and Belonging

Nov 8, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Paul Prior (University of Illinois)
Space is limited for this small-group session.  Please RSVP to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu by October 30. Include any requests for accessibility accomodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making and Remaking a Literate Life: Being, Longing, Belonging

Nov 8, 2017, 2:15 PM-3:45 PM

347 Hinds Hall

Paul Prior (University of Illinois)
Jody Shipka (University of Maryland)
This presentation challenges static notions of being and belonging in accounts of literacies and disciplines. Instead, it offers a dynamic view of the embodied, affective, and historically situated processes of making and remaking literate lives.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making, Being, and Belonging Through Multimodal Composing

Nov 9, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Jody Shipka (University of Maryland)
Space is limited for this small-group session.  Please RSVP to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu by October 30. Include any requests for accessibility accomodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Black Feminists and the Transformation of American Public Life

Nov 27, 2017, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, 140 Newhouse 3

This panel discussion brings together three acclaimed, accomplished black feminists offering personal reflections and insights on topics ranging from the power of collaboration, educational pathways and politics, to key lessons from history, both distant and recent.  A welcome reception will follow in the Hergenhan lobby. This page will be updated as details develop for this exciting Syracuse Symposium Keynote event.

Featured speakers:

Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Principal Consultant at Cook Ross, President Emerita of Spelman College and Bennett College, inaugural Director, National Museum of African Art (retired)
Selected publications:
•    All American Women: Lines That Divide, Ties That Bind (ed.). Free Press, 1986.
•    Conversations: Straight Talk with America’s Sister President. Anchor Press, 1994.
•    Dream the Boldest Dream and Other Lessons of Life. Longstreet Press, 2001.
•    Gender Talk – The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities. Co-authored with Beverly Guy-Sheftall. One World Press, 2003.
•    Who Should Be First? Feminists Speak Out on the 2008 Presidential Campaign. Co-authored with Beverly Guy-Sheftall. SUNY Press, 2010.
•    I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde. Co-edited with Rudolph P. Byrd and Beverly Guy-Sheftall. Oxford University Press, 2011.

Paula J. Giddings, E. A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita, Afro-American Studies, Smith College and journal editor, Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism
Selected publications:
•    When and Where I Enter: The Impact on Black Women on Race and Sex in America. William Morrow & Co, 1984.
•    In Search of Sisterhood: Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement. William Morrow & Co, 1988.
•    Burning All Illusions: Writings from The Nation on Race (ed). Nation Books, 2002.
•    Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. Amistad/Harper Collins, 2008.

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women’s Studies and English and Founding Director, Women’s Research and Resource Center, Spelman College
Selected publications:
•    Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature. Co-edited with Roseann P. Bell and Bettye Parker Smith. Doubleday, 1980
•    Daughters of Sorrow: Attitudes Toward Black Women, 1880-1920. Carlson, 1991.
•    Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. New Press, 1995.
•    Traps: African American Men on Gender and Sexuality. Co-edited with Rudolph Byrd. Indiana University Press, 2001.
•    Gender Talk – The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities. Co-authored with Johnnetta Betsch Cole. One World Press, 2003.
•    Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women's Studies. Co-edited with Stanlie M. James and Frances Smith Foster. Feminist Press, 2009.
•    Who Should Be First? Feminists Speak Out on the 2008 Presidential Campaign. Co-authored with Johnnetta Betsch Cole. SUNY Press, 2010.
•    I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde. Co-edited with Rudolph P. Byrd and Johnnetta Betsch Cole. Oxford University Press, 2011.


Co-Sponsors include:

  1. College of Arts & Sciences
  2. The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  3. Barry L. Wells, Special Assistant to the Chancellor
  4. School of Education
  5. Office of Multi-cultural Affairs
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Music in Multicultural Syracuse: New American Musical Traditions

Dec 2, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:30 PM

Grant Auditorium, White Hall

A musical performance at 6 p.m., reception to follow at 7:30 p.m. -- details coming soon!
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence against Marginalized Communities

Dec 4, 2017, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Melissa Adler (University of Kentucky)

Systems of classification exist across every field, from biological taxonomies to library shelves. These systems reflect the values of their creators and exert power in defining relationships of belonging. Using classifications as primary historical texts and conceptualizing them as systems that organize state and cultural discourses, Adler will discuss some of the processes by which the marginalization of queer and racialized subjects becomes systemic, and ways that critical analysis reveals possibilities for organizing otherwise. Interdisciplinary fields, such as critical animal studies, disability studies, queer studies, and critical race studies are deeply invested in the critique and production of taxonomies and language, and while they share similar histories of oppression, their subjects push the limits of classifications in unique and compelling ways.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Taxonomic Repair Work

Dec 5, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Melissa Adler (University of Kentucky)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Theatre of the Mind: Staging Mental Health & Sense of Belonging

Jan 28, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Sutton Pavilion, Syracuse Stage

In conjunction with our production of Next to Normal -- and following a matinee performance on Sunday, January 28 -- Syracuse Stage will host a panel of mental health educators, theatre artists, psychiatric practitioners, and community members for an in-depth public discussion. 

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Inside the Other: The films of Eva Rødro and Kahlik Allah

Mar 8, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium (401 Harrison Street, Syracuse)

The public is invited to this screening and reception.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Classification & Language(s) of Belonging

Apr 5, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Classification & Language(s) of Belonging

Apr 6, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Eco-Dharma: Belonging to the Earth

Apr 19, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

David Loy (Boulder, CO)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Care/Work: Queer Disabled Femme of Color Magic

Apr 25, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

In this performance/reading, poet Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha reads from new and recent work focused on queer hard femme disabled poetics of color -- the intersections of working class femme smarts and survival, crip world, femme on femme of color intimacies and the rebellions and vulnerable strengths found therein.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Care/Work: Queer Disabled Femme of Color Magic

Apr 26, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)