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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Stories in the Blood: Slave Narratives and Identity in Contemporary American Theatre

Oct 21, 2018, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee Street, Syracuse

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Christian DuComb (Colgate University)
John Ernest
(Delaware University)
Joan Bryant (Syracuse University)
Kyle Bass (Playwright, Syracuse Stage)
Tazewell Thompson (Director, Syracuse Stage)

This free, public panel discussion features educators, scholars, and artists whose work reflects the importance of storytelling identities in the American narrative. This dialogue and audience Q&A session is open to community-wide audiences interested in exploring questions raised by the Syracuse Stage world premiere production of Possessing Harriet. [Performance tickets sold separately.]

Live, visceral and immediate, theatre is the most powerful art form we have with which to enact, investigate, and interrogate the past and the present, and to imagine the future. Theatre asks powerful and necessary questions of its audience and its practitioners. Engagement with public scholarship about cultures, art and histories enriches an entire community-faculty, students and general community alike-whose understandings about the human condition are challenged and deepened through the experience of live theatre, its depictions of human experience, and the necessary dialogues it brings us to.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Authority and Utility in Spinoza: From Epicureanism to Neoliberalism?

Oct 23, 2018, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Tolley 304

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Mellon Distinguished Visiting Collaborator

Dimitris Vardoulakis (Western Sydney University)

Vardoulakis discusses his argument that Spinoza is influenced by epicureanism. This is evident particularly in the conflict between authority—understood as the kind of figure that is impervious to argumentation—and the calculation of utility (phronesis) that is the precondition of action. This conflict is complex because in certain circumstances we may calculate that it is to our utility to allow a person in authority to calculate on our behalf. The paper indicates, in addition, that the way Spinoza constructs the relation between authority and utility can inform our political predicament today. Spinoza may offer an alternative to populism as to why we have political figures who lack authority. And his thinking on utility could help us reconsider instrumentality in the neoliberal age.

RSVP to Aimee Germain by Oct. 15; include any accessibility requests.


Biography: Dimitris Vardoulakis is the deputy chair of Philosophy at Western Sydney University. He is the author of The Doppelgänger: Literature’s Philosophy (2010), Sovereignty and its Other: Toward the Dejustification of Violence (2013), Freedom from the Free Will: On Kafka’s Laughter (2016), and Stasis Before the State: Nine Theses on Agonistic Democracy (2018). He has also edited or co-edited numerous books, including Spinoza Now (2011) and Spinoza’s Authority (2018). He is the director of “Thinking Out Loud: The Sydney Lectures in Philosophy and Society,” and the co-editor of the book series “Incitements” (Edinburgh University Press).

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

An Evening With Margaret Atwood

Oct 25, 2018, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

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University Lecture Series

Canadian writer Margaret Atwood, the internationally acclaimed author of The Handmaid’s Tale (now an Emmy-winning television series) and Alias Grace, discusses her iconic career and literary successes in conversation with Dana Spiotta, novelist and associate professor of English and Creative Writing at Syracuse University.

This University Lecture Series event is co-sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences.


Biography: Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 40 novels, non-fiction works, short story collections, children’s books, books of poetry and one graphic novel to her credit over her more than 50-year career. Her work has been published in more than 40 languages.

Her list of honors exceeds 125 recognitions, starting in the early 1960s and including the Man Booker Prize, the Arthur C. Clarke Award for Best Science Fiction, the Franz Kafka International Literary Prize, the Harvard Arts Medal, the Raymond Chandler Award, the Carl Sandburg Literary Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She has received 26 honorary degrees. Atwood is a founding trustee of the Griffin Poetry Prize and a founder of the Writers’ Trust of Canada, a nonprofit literary organization that seeks to encourage Canada’s writing community.

She is also an inventor. In 2004, while on a paperback tour in Denver for her novel “Oryx and Crake,” Atwood conceived the concept of a remote robotic writing technology, the LongPen, that would allow someone to write in ink anywhere in the world via tablet PC and the internet.

 

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The Memory of Ingenious Things: Late Renaissance Altarpieces by Giovanni Battista Naldini and Bernardino Poccetti at Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence

Oct 26, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

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Douglas Dow (Kansas State University)

Dow, a specialist in the history of Italian Renaissance, focuses on the religious art of the late sixteenth century in Florence—a period long neglected in scholarship, mostly due to prejudices against Counter-Reformation Italian painting and the fact that it falls between the traditional (and problematic) periods of the so-called High Renaissance and the Baroque. In this talk Dow explores two sixteenth-century altarpieces commissioned by a local confraternity for the important Carmelite basilica of Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence. The unorthodox iconographies of these images attest to the willingness of artists and patrons to deviate from Counter-Reformation codes of artistic decorum to meet the devotional needs of local constituencies.

The Department of Art & Music Histories and the Medieval-Renaissance Group co-host Professor Dow's visit.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Open Space New Media Documentary: A Toolkit for Theory and Practice

Oct 26, 2018, 2:00 PM-7:00 PM

Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY

Patricia Zimmermann (Ithaca College)

Zimmermann spends the day at Hobart and William Smith Colleges for a screening and conversation. Contact Leah Shafer for scheduling details.

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Taco Literacies: Writing Transnational Foodways

Oct 29, 2018, 2:15 PM-3:40 PM

319 Sims

Steven Alvarez (St. John's University)

Alvarez hosts a workshop focused on his work and scholarship, writing about Mexican foodways connected to literacy, migration, pedagogy, and transnational social relationships.

View or download the event flier.

Additional support:

  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Falk College
  • Sociology
  • Writing Our Lives
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
  • Xicanxs Empowering Xicanxs

 

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Migrant Rights and the Labor of Food Justice, a platica

Oct 30, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:30 PM

319 Sims

Steven Alvarez (St. John's University)
Crispin Hernandez (CNY Workers Center)
Laura-Anne Minkoff-Zern (Falk Food Studies)
Gretchen Purser, moderator (Maxwell-Sociology)

Bringing together academic and community-based knowledges on food, work, and immigration, this talk focuses on ideas from Alvarez's new book project,“Taco Literacy,” exploring the cultural politics of transnational foodways. Purser moderates discussion between Alvarez, Hernandez, and Minkoff-Zern.

View or download the event flier.

Additional supporters:

  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Falk College
  • Sociology
  • Writing Our Lives
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
  • Xicanxs Empowering Xicanxs
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Nomadologie, encore un effort? Citizenship, World Literature, and Patrick Modiano

Nov 1, 2018, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

T.B.A.

Irving Goh (National University of Singapore)

Goh, currently a Franke Visiting Fellow, Whitney Humanities Center, Yale University, encourages learning through World Literature to dismantle our fixation with the ‘citizen figure.'

Scholarship on World Literature has the tendency to assume the cultivation of a cosmopolitan citizen as its teleology. World Literature in itself, however, has never demanded of its readers citizenship status; it teaches us, to the contrary, to be without citizenship. We should heed that lesson seriously today. I argue that learning through World Literature to dismantle our fixation with the citizen figure allows us to 1) critique the biopolitical hold the State has on us via the notion of citizenship, 2) weaken the ideological claims of global terrorism, which, according to Alain Badiou, takes the arrogant and complacent neoliberal citizen as complicit in capitalist practices that negate not just the livelihood but also lives of those who do not acquiesce to them, and 3) reclaim the essence of the city, which is all about crossings and encounters, an essence that we are gradually losing to that same global terrorism that has increasingly targeted cities and citizens.

In those regards, World Literature encourages us to rethink what Deleuze and Guattari have called “nomadology,” which I find to subtend the works of the French writer Patrick Modiano, and hence suggest that Modiano should also be read as World Literature.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mama's Clothes: Visual Storytelling in the Photographs of Keisha Scarville

Nov 1, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Ellis Gallery, Light Work, 316 Waverly Avenue, Syracuse

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Keisha Scarville (Brooklyn, NY)

Reception: 5:00 p.m.
Gallery talk: 6:00 p.m.

Light Work hosts a gallery talk and tour of Keisha Scarville's exhibition, Alma. For the past several years since the death of her mother, the artist has used her mothers clothing and possessions to explore notions of absence and the camera's role in visualizing that which cannot be seen but felt. Scarville discusses her work and process in creating a narrative about loss and rebirth.

ASL will be provided at the gallery talk.

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CUSE Grants Info Session

Nov 2, 2018, 9:00 AM-10:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

John Liu (Office of Research)
Christina Docteur (Office of Research)
Stuart Taub (Office of Sponsored Programs)

Liu, Docteur, and Taub join previous grantees in the Humanities to discuss this year's CUSE Grant opportunities, in advance of the next application deadline.

Contact the Humanities Center by October 26 with any accommodations requests.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Keisha Scarville Portfolio Workshop

Nov 2, 2018, 3:00 PM-7:00 PM

Light Work, 316 Waverly Avenue

Keisha Scarville (Brooklyn, NY)

Photographers and artists working in photo-based media are invited to register for a portfolio review by Brooklyn-based artist, Keisha Scarville. Paticipants must bring a set of prints to review within the 15 minute one-on-one session. These consultations are free, by appointment only, and must be scheduled in advance. To reserve a spot, please contact Mary Lee Hodgens by October 15th.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Odyssey: Stories of the Boat People

Nov 2, 2018, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

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Vân-Ánh Vanessa VÕ (Hanoi, Vietnam)

Created to mark the 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War, “The Odyssey” shares stories of the boat people through live music and video. Composer/videographer Vân-Ánh Vanessa VÕ structured the work to convey the personal and spiritual journey of refugees, past and present.

“The Odyssey” was commissioned by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts San Francisco; Creative Work Fund; Lam Family; and Pham & Do Family. Vo performs with Society for New Music all-stars.

S.U. faculty, staff & students admitted free with valid ID. Visit SNM website or call 315-251-1151 for details.

View or download the event flier.

Additional supporters:

  • Religion Deptartment
  • Newhouse Schoo of Public Communications
  • Setnor School of Music
  • CNY Arts
  • Syracuse City HS & MS presentations
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Slow Historical Studies: Crafting Approaches

Nov 3, 2018, 12:00 PM-6:00 PM

411A Lyman Hall

In this first meeting of the Slow Historical Studies working group, conversation will focus on establishing a core group for future meetings/activities, as well as beginning discussions on what slow approaches to history and archaeology are and the potential of slow theoretical, ethical and methodological approaches to the past. This meeting will set a scholarly foundation for the discussions of the Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) 2019 conference, hosted by the Department of Anthropology in May, 2019.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group, "Slow Historical Studies." (HS2)

RSVP to Guido Pezzarossi by October 22.

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Language Acts and Worldmaking: Our Words Make Worlds

Nov 6, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Sophie Stevens (King's College, London)

Stevens presents research from the UK-based humanities project, “Language Acts and Worldmaking,” using as an example the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds. Dr. Stevens shows how the project proposes a more global approach to language teaching and learning as a way to foreground language’s power to continually shape how we live and make our worlds.

Additional supporters:

  • Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
  • Centro de Estudios Hispánicos
  • Program on Latin America and the Caribbean (PLACA)
  • Latino/Latin American Studies (LLAS)
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Alliances with Mothers of the 'Disappeared' in Mexico: The Challenges of Feminist Legal Anthropology in Times of the Crisis of Human Rights

Nov 6, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

309 Sims Hall

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R. Aída Hernández Castillo (CIESAS, Mexico City)

Castillo leads a compelling discussion of the limits and possibilities of feminist legal activism in the service of human rights and social justice, analyzing ethnographies of state spaces that revictimize families of “the disappeared.”  Hernandez-Castillo is part of an all women Forensic team working with mothers of the disappeared kids.

View or download the event flier.

Additional supporters:

  • Women's & Gender Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies

 

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Slough Media

Nov 7, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

201 Little Hall, Colgate University

Rebecca Schneider (Brown University)

Schneider draws from her forthcoming essay, "Slough Media," to consider the entanglement of media and the body in deep time, questioning the binaries of ephemerality and endurance, obsolescence and persistence. Seminar participants will read a pre-circulated draft of "Slough Media," for discussion. For more information, contact Christian DuComb.


Biography: Rebecca Schneider is a performance and media theorist, whose publications include Performing Remains: Art and War in Times of Theatrical Reenactment (Routledge, 2011) and The Explicit Body in Performance (Routledge, 1997).

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

History and Archaeology in Cape Verde: The Rise of a Global World

Nov 7, 2018, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Rush Rhees Library, Hawkins-Carlson Reading Room, University of Rochester

Jorge de Juan Ares (Institut de Recherche sur les Archéomatériaux, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Orleans, France)

The Republic of Cape Verde comprises ten volcanic islands located 600 km west of Senegal coast discovered in 1460. Their geographical location made them the most suitable place for the Portuguese crown to establish a settlement from where explore the African coast. The archaeological excavations at the Royal Fortress of San Felipe and at the Convent of San Francisco and elsewhere have served to highlight the outstanding past of Ribeira Grande, currently Cidade Velha, showing its intense links with Europe, Asia, Africa and America during the 15th and 18th centuries.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group, "Reconstruction, Structural Analysis, and Conservation of Ancient Monuments in Coastal Ghana." (DH10)

For more information, contact Renato Perucchio.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Returning from Conflict: A Nonfiction Reading by the Syracuse Veterans’ Writing Group

Nov 8, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:30 PM

Goldstein Alumni and Faculty Center

5:00 p.m. Reception
6-7:30 p.m. Readings

In seeking to honor veterans for their service, Veterans Day celebrations tend to elevate veterans to the status of “heroes,” distancing them from civilian publics by placing them on stages and parade floats and emphasizing stories of super-human courage, endurance, and self-sacrifice. This hypervisible hero image effaces veterans’ full humanity and silences narratives of grief, loss, guilt, injury, outrage, healing, humor, and resistance.

This Veterans’ Day, members of the Syracuse Veterans’ Writing Group will read from their original works of creative nonfiction, representing a wide diversity of themes and complicated perspectives on the military. Collectively, these writers bear witness to over 50 years of U.S. military history. With an accompanying reception, audience members are invited to comment and ask questions before and after the reading.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Nonfiction Reading Series
  • IVMF
  • OVMA
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Program for the Advancement of Research in Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
  • Department of English
  • Contemplative Collaborative
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Stewardship of the Spiritual: Museum and Large Site-Specific Installations

Nov 12, 2018, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Eric Wolf (Sotheby's Institute of Art)

An expert in the architectural history of the modern museum, Wolf analyzes the spiritual elements that make up a significant part of the experience and meaning of modern museums in this country, despite the fact that the institutions claim secularism in their catechisms. The transcendent and the spiritual have been inescapable goals of those institutions in their programming and building both, as close and critical looking reveals, and the results can be glorious. Students, staff and faculty will benefit from the perspectives Dr. Wolf’s research brings to understanding and engagement with cultural institutions’ spiritual aims.

Additional supporters:

  • Art & Music Histories
  • Religion
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Cultural Analysis of the Film, The Namesake

Nov 13, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:20 PM

135 Sims Hall

Mridula Mascarenhas (California State University, Monterey Bay)

Mascarenhas, a rhetorical scholar, uses her cross-cultural knowledge and expertise in rhetoric of film to provide a cultural analysis of the film. Attendees are asked to view the film prior to the lecture.

For information, contact Richard Buttny.

This event is sponsored by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group VAC21, Crossing Cultures Through Film.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Witkin & Witkin: Twin Stories of a Photographer and a Painter

Nov 13, 2018, 6:30 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

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Trisha Ziff (filmmaker)
Jerome Witkin (artist)

The organizers of the annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival host a public screening of Trisha Ziff’s double-portrait of identical twin brothers: contemporary photographer Joel-Peter Witkin and Jerome Witkin, a realist painter and a life-long art teacher at Syracuse University.

Filmed in Mexico City, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Brooklyn and Syracuse, Ziff’s work examines not only the stories behind the twins’ richly narrative photographs and paintings, but also the ways in which their shared family stories become both sources for their creativity and for their separation from one another.

A reception precedes the screening, followed by a conversation between Ziff and Jerome Witkin. The film will be screened with English captions.

Additional supporters:

  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Office of the Provost
  • Department of English
  • Department of Transmedia
  • Department of Studio Arts
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Syracuse University Art Galleries

 

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U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: Time for the Concerned Public to Intervene Again

Nov 29, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities for 2018 presented by Frank von Hippel

The last massive intervention by the concerned public in U.S. nuclear weapons policy was by the grassroots Nuclear Weapons Freeze Movement and its European counterpart in the early 1980s.  One result was to shift the U.S. government from insisting that the Soviet Union believed it possible to fight and win a nuclear war, and therefore so must we; to repeated joint summit statements by Presidents Gorbachev and Reagan that “nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought.”  More tangibly, the result was a reduction in the global stock of nuclear warheads from about 65,000 in 1991 to about 10,000 today.
 
The effect has worn off, however, and two separate but related nuclear arms races have begun: between the U.S. and Russia and the U.S. and China, plus proliferation crises with the “rogue” states, North Korea and Iran.
 
von Hippel will explain the perverse dynamics underlying these crises, discussing possible initiatives to mitigate them, such as a U.S. "no-first use" policy, restoration of limits on ineffective but provocative ballistic missile defenses, resumption of US-Russian nuclear reductions along with a cap on China’s nuclear buildup, and strengthening the nonproliferation regime with bans on the separation of plutonium and on national uranium enrichment capabilities.


Biography: Frank von Hippel is Senior Research Physicist and Professor of Public and International Affairs emeritus at Princeton University where, in 1975, he co-founded and co-chaired for three decades the Program on Science and Global Security. In 2006, he co-founded the International Panel on Fissile Materials and co-chaired it for its first nine years

During 1983-90, he worked with President Gorbachev’s advisor, Evgenyi Velikhov, to develop a number of successful initiatives to end nuclear testing, end the production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium for weapons, and eliminate excess weapons materials.

He has advised U.S. Administrations and Congress on nuclear security issues since the Carter Administration. During 1993-4, he served as Assistant Director for National Security in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and helped develop U.S.- Russian cooperative initiatives on nuclear threat reduction.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Info Session: Applying for New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellowships for 2019-20

Dec 7, 2018, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Camilla Bell (Cultural Foundations of Education, current Fellow)
Gemma Cooper-Novack (Literacy Education, current Fellow)
Jesse Swann-Quinn (Ph.D. Geography, 2016-17 Fellow)

Announcing the Call for Applicants for the 2019-20 Public Humanities Graduate Fellowship program, a shared initiative of the Humanities Center and the CNY Humanities Corridor, in partnership with Humanities New York

At this jointly-hosted information session, current and former fellows will talk about the fellowship and answer questions. Light breakfast available.

More about the fellowships:

  • At Syracuse University, the program is open to graduate students pursuing a PhD in Anthropology, Composition & Cultural Rhetoric, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Cultural Foundations of Education, or Literacy in Education. It is also open to graduate students pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing or in VPA (3-year MFA programs only).
  • Each year, Syracuase University is granted two fellowships. Learn more about our current and prior fellows.
  • Application links are at the HNY website.​
  • Early/additional questions? Contact Humanities New York Program Officer Adam Capitanio, 212-233-1131.

View or download the event flier.

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Learn more about the Research of the Humanities Center's Dissertation Fellows

Jan 25, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Lorenza D'Angelo (Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy)
Adam Kozaczka (Ph.D. Candidate, English)

Save the date to enjoy light breakfast as this year's Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows for 2018-19 talk about their current work. Additional details coming soon.
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A Stirring Song Sung Heroic: African Americans from Slavery to Freedom, 1619 to 1865

Jan 29, 2019, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

William Earle Williams (Haverford College)

Photographer and curator William Earle Willilams presents an Artist Talk in correlation to the SUArt Galleries exhibition, A Stirring Song Sung Heroic: African Americans from Slavery to Freedom, 1619 to 1865. Williams' photographs have been widely exhibited at venues including the National Gallery of Art, Cleveland Art Museum, and the African American Museum, and are in many public collections including the National Gallery of Art, Baltimore Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He has curated over eighty exhibitions featuring the work of Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, Paul Strand, and Harold Edgerton among others.

This exhibition presents the history of American slavery across a series of 135 black and white silver gelatin prints.  These images document mostly anonymous, unheralded, and uncelebrated places in the New World—from the Caribbean to North America—where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom. Archives of prints, newspapers, and other ephemera related to the struggle accompany the work.

Additional supporters:

  • SUArt Galleries
  • Coalition of Museum and Art Centers
  • Department of Transmedia

 

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell and the Rock Biography: A Conversation with Anthony DeCurtis and David Yaffe

Feb 19, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

T.B.D.

Anthony DeCurtis (Music Critic)
David Yaffe (SU Humanities)

Using his recent book, Lou Reed: A Life (New York: Little, Brown & Company, 2017) as a springboard, DeCurtis talks about the nature and challenges of writing a biography. Yaffe, author of 2017's Reckless Daughter: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell, joins him to discuss the process of sifting through interviews, anecdotes, historical records, personal artifacts, press accounts, public documents and other sources to tell one's story.


Biography: Anthony DeCurtis, a longtime editor for Rolling Stone magazine, also holds a Ph.D. in American literature from Indiana University, is the author and editor of half a dozen books, and has won numerous awards, including a Grammy for his liner notes to the Eric Clapton box set. Decurtis’s portrait of Reed has already won praise as “the best Reed biography to date” (New York Times Book Review).

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TENDER R/AGE :: RABIA TIERNA

Feb 21, 2019, 4:30 PM-5:30 PM

times and location T.B.D.

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Adela Licona (University of Arizona)

This Syracuse Symposium keynote address is a call to action. NO CAGES. This multimodal interventionist art project begins in recognition that forced separation is not a new practice but one with a long and brutal history connected to colonization, slavery, internment, and imprisonment. Licona contextualizes and connects these histories to specific cruelties presently being enacted on migrant and refugee children and their families through forced separation at the US/Mexico border. This online and installation-ready project participates visually, textually, and sonically in a collective outcry against the caging of children and other migrants.


Biography: Adela Licona is Associate Professor of English and Vice Chair of the GIDP in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory, is affiliated faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute of the Environment, and Mexican American Studies at the University of Arizona. Her research and teaching interests include space and visual rhetorics, cultural, ethnic, gender, and sexuality studies, race, borderlands studies, social justice media, environmental justice, feminist pedagogy, community literacies, action-oriented research and arts-based inquiry.

Licona’s photography has appeared in Versal; Edible Baja Magazine; TRIVIA; Proximities; Terrain; Kairos; Community Literacy; and The Rasp and the Wine. It has been exhibited in Tucson, Arizona, San Francisco, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. She was awarded a PLAYA Residency in Fall 2018.

Licona is co-editor of Feminist Pedagogy: Looking Back to Move Forward (JHUP, 2009), author of Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2012), and co-editor of Precarious Rhetorics (OSUP, forthcoming).

Licona co-directed the Crossroads Collaborative, a Ford Foundation-funded think-and-act research, writing, and teaching collective designed for action-oriented research on youth, sexuality, health, rights, and justice. With graduate students, she co-founded Feminist Action Research in Rhetoric, FARR, a group of progressive feminist scholars committed to public scholarship and community dialogue.

Licona served as Co-Chair of two National Women’s Studies Association Conferences (2015-16), is Editor Emeritus of Feminist Formations, and serves on advisory/editorial boards for QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, Feminist Formations, the Primavera Foundation, and the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam, a project of Spoken Futures.


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
  • Lender Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

RELATE: A Workshop on Engaged Scholarship

Feb 22, 2019, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Adela Licona (University of Arizona)

To complement her Syracuse Symposium keynote presentation, Licona leads this workshop of focused shared discussion. Participants will examine action-oriented, interdisciplinary approaches to community building and engagement through a relational, borderlands framework. The agenda also includes fostering collaboration, forging coalition, and enacting multiple methodologies to spark multidimensional imaginaries and bridge art.

To RSVP, contact humcenter@syr.edu by February 13 and include any accessibility requests.


Biography: Adela Licona is Associate Professor of English and Vice Chair of the GIDP in Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory, is affiliated faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute of the Environment, and Mexican American Studies at the University of Arizona. Her research and teaching interests include space and visual rhetorics, cultural, ethnic, gender, and sexuality studies, race, borderlands studies, social justice media, environmental justice, feminist pedagogy, community literacies, action-oriented research and arts-based inquiry.

Licona’s photography has appeared in Versal; Edible Baja Magazine; TRIVIA; Proximities; Terrain; Kairos; Community Literacy; and The Rasp and the Wine. It has been exhibited in Tucson, Arizona, San Francisco, California, and Atlanta, Georgia. She was awarded a PLAYA Residency in Fall 2018.

Licona is co-editor of Feminist Pedagogy: Looking Back to Move Forward (JHUP, 2009), author of Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2012), and co-editor of Precarious Rhetorics (OSUP, forthcoming).

Licona co-directed the Crossroads Collaborative, a Ford Foundation-funded think-and-act research, writing, and teaching collective designed for action-oriented research on youth, sexuality, health, rights, and justice. With graduate students, she co-founded Feminist Action Research in Rhetoric, FARR, a group of progressive feminist scholars committed to public scholarship and community dialogue.

Licona served as Co-Chair of two National Women’s Studies Association Conferences (2015-16), is Editor Emeritus of Feminist Formations, and serves on advisory/editorial boards for QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, Feminist Formations, the Primavera Foundation, and the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam, a project of Spoken Futures.


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
  • Lender Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Stories We are Told, Stories We Tell: Explorations in Ethnographic Methods

Feb 26, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

(T.B.A.)

Kirin Narayan (Australian National University)
Joyce Flueckiger (Emory University)
Corrine Dempsey (Nazareth College)
Priti Ramamurthy (University of Washington)

A panel of renowned scholar-storytellers discuss their work in and beyond India.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Graduate Student Workshop: Explorations in Ethnographic Methods

Feb 27, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

352 Eggers, 341 Eggers, 306B Eggers

Kirin Narayan (Australian National University)
Joyce Flueckiger (Emory University)
Corrine Dempsey (Nazareth College)
Priti Ramamurthy (University of Washington)

Eminent scholars of religion and anthropology conduct ethnographic workshops for advanced graduate students.
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No Innocence This Side of the Womb: Confronting Issues of Privilege, Diversity and Inclusion, From Syracuse to South Africa

Feb 28, 2019, 9:30 AM-5:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

This symposium-format event brings together U.S. and South African artists, academics, policy makers, journalists and the audience to analyze how we have responded to our shared struggles. Images and sounds of South Africa surround participants engaging in rotating panel discussions. This is an opportunity to examine our many similarities without ignoring our differences and distinct histories, and to recognize and reflect on shared struggles of racism, poverty and privilege confronting South Africa and Syracuse.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Indigenous Haudenosaunee Stories of the 17th Century Encounter with the Jesuits

Mar 5, 2019, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Susan Hill (University of Toronto)

The appearance of the French Jesuits at Onondaga Lake from 1656-58 has been narrated as a triumphal story of first contact with the Onondaga Nation. This is profoundly different from the Onondaga versions of this encounter that are recorded in wampum belts and told in oral stories.  Hill's talk examines the gap between written and oral versions or this encounter.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

T.B.A. - Susan Hill Panel and Workshop

Mar 6, 2019, 11:00 AM-1:00 PM

Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center, 6680 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool

Susan Hill (University of Toronto)

Religion hosts a panel discussion and workshop at the Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center. Details coming soon.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Build: The Power of Hip Hop in a Divided World

Mar 7, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Mark Katz (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

In this public lecture, Katz tells the little-known story of the emergence of hip-hop diplomacy, explaining the circumstances that led the State Department to invest significant resources into sending hip-hop artists around the world as cultural ambassadors.

Additional supporters:

CNY Humanities Corridor [Sound and Media Working Group]

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Man On Fire (Film Screening)

Mar 21, 2019, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Kittredge Auditorium, HB Crouse

James Chase Sanchez (Middlebury College)

Sanchez's documentary Man on Fire untangles the pieces of Charles Moore’s life tracing the reasons he conducted a self-immolation protest against racism in 2014. It illustrates the racism of Moore’s hometown of Grand Saline, Texas and how residents of the town dealt with the aftermath of Moore’s death. Q&A time with the filmmaker follows the screening.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies Rhetoric and Composition
  • Center for Teaching Excellence
  • Film Studies
  • African American Studies
  • Lender Center for Social Justice
  • La Casita Cultural Center
  • The Maxwell School
  • Department of English
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • First Year Experience
  • Language Literatures and Linguistics
  • School of Education
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Designing Stories of Abolition and Coalition: Illuminating History in Central New York

Mar 21, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Nancy Cantor Warehouse, 350 W. Fayette Street

Jeffrey Ludwig (Seward House and Museum)
Peter Hyde (Peter Hyde Designs)
Andrew Saluti (SU Graduate Program in Museum Studies), moderator

Panelists Ludwig and Hyde use their new exhibition (as curator and designer, respectively) about the Seward House, Underground Railroad, and Margaret Stewart, niece of Harriet Tubman; as a foundation for conversation about the collaborative process of designing and interpreting history.

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Talking About Race

Mar 22, 2019, 2:15 PM-3:45 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

James Chase Sanchez (Middlebury College)

This teaching workshop offers interested students and scholars an innovative take on current debates surrounding activism, white supremacy, and racism, while providing practical ways for faculty and instructors to engage in these issues in the classroom.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies Rhetoric and Composition
  • Center for Teaching Excellence
  • Film Studies
  • African American Studies
  • Lender Center for Social Justice
  • La Casita Cultural Center
  • The Maxwell School
  • Department of English
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • First Year Experience
  • Language Literatures and Linguistics
  • School of Education
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Larry Blumenfeld: Watson Visiting Professor in Residency

Mar 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations vary

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

Through a two-week residency at Syracuse University as Watson Visiting Professor for 2019 , cultural journalist Larry Blumenfeld examines jazz as an aesthetic construct, a living culture, a language of many dialects, a personalized science and a framework for thought and action as related to social justice. Ignoring popular myths of jazz as “America’s classical music” and looking beyond concerns of style and genre, he focuses on the story of jazz culture in terms of both history and the current cultural landscape, and upon the music’s capacity to tell stories. In so doing, Blumenfeld draws on his 30 years of journalism and criticism; his deep immersion in the jazz cultures of New York, New Orleans and Havana; and his close working relationships and ongoing dialogues with celebrated musicians.

Various discussions and activities are developing for Blumenfeld's residency:

Monday, March 25, 4:30-6 p.m.
Welcome Reception for Larry Blumenfeld
Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Tuesday, March 26, 5-6:30 p.m.
Chicago Fire: The Men and Women of the AACM and Their Enduring Power
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Wednesday, March 27, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Writing About Improvisation: A Workshop
304 Tolley Humanities Building

Friday, March 29, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
La Conexión Cubana (The Cuban Connection), featuring Yosvany Terry Quartet
La Casita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco Street

Monday, April 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Armstrong in Prison: The Fight for New Orleans Jazz Culture Since the Flood
Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Tuesday, April 2, 6:30-8 p.m.
How Does Jazz Survive (and Thrive)?
Lender Auditorium, 007 Whitman School of Management

Wednesday, April 3, 2-4 p.m.
The Answer is Culture: A Roundtable Discussion About Arts, Activism, and Cultural Policy
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Thursday, April 4, 12:30-2 p.m.
Jazz Listening Party
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Friday, April 5, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
'Gangsterism' on Campus: A Conversation About Jazz, Race, Creative Intent and the Legacies of Thelonious Monk and Jean-Michel Basquiat (featuring Jason Moran)
Hendricks Chapel


BIOGRAPHY: Larry Blumenfeld is a culture reporter, music critic and lecturer, who writes regularly for The Wall Street Journal, and has contributed to many newspapers, magazines, scholarly essay collections and websites. His work focuses on jazz and Afro-Latin music, and on the intersections between culture, politics and activism. His research as a Katrina Media Fellow for the Open Society Institute inspired a book about cultural recovery in New Orleans, due next year from the University of California Press. He was a National Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He curates Spoleto Festival USA’s jazz series; the Deer Isle Jazz Festival in Stonington, Maine; and the National Jazz Museum in Harlem’s series, 'Jazz and Social Justice.'


The 2019 Watson Professor residency is hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and Assistant Professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Welcome Reception for Larry Blumenfeld

Mar 25, 2019, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

Join us in celebrating this year's Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities, Larry Blumenfeld.


The 2019 Watson Professor residency is hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Chicago Fire: The Men and Women of the A.A.C.M. and Their Enduring Power

Mar 26, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

Presentation details coming soon.

*AACM: Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Writing About Improvisation

Mar 27, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Workshop details coming soon.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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La Conexión Cubana (The Cuban Connection)

Mar 29, 2019, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

La Casita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco St.

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)
Yosvany Terry (Harlem, NY)

Details about this talk and accompanying performance by the Yosvanny Terry Quartet, coming soon.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Armstrong in Prison: The Fight for New Orleans Jazz Culture Since the Flood

Apr 1, 2019, 5:40 PM-7:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Presentation details coming soon.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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How Does Jazz Survive (and Thrive)?

Apr 2, 2019, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Lender Auditorium, 007 Whitman School of Management

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Details coming soon about this presentation, co-presented by the Bandier Program's Soyars Leadership Lecture Series.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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The Answer Is Culture: A Roundtable Discussion About Arts, Activism and Cultural Policy

Apr 3, 2019, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Details coming soon about this roundtable discussion.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Jazz Listening Party

Apr 4, 2019, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Details coming soon about this listening session, coordinated with the Belfer Archives.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Rooms Remembered: A Reading by Poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar

Apr 4, 2019, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

Acclaimed poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar’s four books exquisitely demonstrate how the unique particulars of an individual’s life stories -- the horrors of anti-Semitism, the pain of childhood neglect and abuse, the grief of losing a spouse -- can, through the filter of art, shimmer with universal truths. Audience Q&A follows her reading.


Biography: Laure-Anne Bosselaar is the author and of The Hour Between Dog and Wolf, and of  Small Gods of Grief which was awarded the Isabella Gardner Prize for Poetry. Her third poetry collection, A New Hunger, was selected as an ALA Notable Book in 2008. Her next book, These Many Rooms, will be published in January 2019. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, and her poems have appeared such publications as The Washington Post, Georgia Review, Harvard Review, and Ploughshares, among others. She is also the editor of four anthologies: Night Out: Poems about Hotels, Motels, Restaurants and Bars, Outsiders: Poems about Rebels, Exiles and Renegades, Urban Nature: Poems about Wildlife in the Cities, and Never Before: Poems about First Experiences. She taught poetry at Emerson College and at the MFA in Creative Writing Program at Sarah Lawrence College, and also served as the McEver Chair for Visiting Writers at Georgia Tech University in Atlanta, Georgia. Currently, she is a member of the founding faculty at the Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program of Pine Manor College.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Writing Your Times: Poetry, Narrative, and Witness

Apr 5, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Laure-Anne Bosselaar (Pine Manor College)

Following an evening of poetry, Bosselaar conducts this mini-seminar designed for serious writers and instructors, advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, creative writing MFA students from Syracuse University, and faculty members from both programs.

To RSVP, contact Phil Memmer [315-474-6851 x328] by March 28 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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'Gangsterism' on Campus: A Conversation About Jazz, Race, Creative Intent and the Legacies of Thelonious Monk and Jean-Michel Basquiat

Apr 5, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Jason Moran (Pianist, Visual Artist)
Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Details coming soon about this talk mixed with a solo piano performance by Moran.


This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Granada-Tetuan: A Search for the Common Roots of Andalusian and Flamenco Music

Apr 11, 2019, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

104 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

Eva Manzano (dance)
Antonio “El Turry” (voice)
Suhail Serghini (guitar, strings)

This exciting, educational presentation traces the development of music in southern Spain focusing on north African roots. The historical and artistic relationship between the Spanish city of Granada and the Moroccan city of Tetuan become apparent in the transnational, cross-cultural influences found in musical expression. Eva Manzano, an accomplished flamenco dancer, leads the group through the development of dance styles that reflect the long-standing historical exchange between the south of Spain and Morocco. The program features accompaniment by guitarist Suhail Serghini, who also plays the north African lute and other instruments, and vocalist “El Turry.”

This event at Syracuse University is part of a week-long series of events including a performance at the Le Moyne College Performing Arts Center, dance workshops and instrument demonstrations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

And They Came For Us

Apr 11, 2019, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

T.B.D.

A two-day interdisciplinary symposium exploring the theme of authoritarianism over the past century begins with a film screening and (tentative) conversation with the filmmakers. Details coming soon.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Challenging Authoritarianism: Stories and Strategies of Resistance

Apr 12, 2019, 9:00 AM-6:00 PM

Strasser Legacy Room, Eggers 220

This two-day interdisciplinary symposium -- beginning with a film screening on April 11 -- explores the theme of authoritarianism over the past century. From the Japanese-American internment to the fall of the Berlin Wall to the "Travel Ban," this day of reflection examines stories and strategies that individuals and institutions have adopted to challenge and thwart authoritarianism.

9:00 - 10:30 a.m., Eggers 220
US and the World Workshop: Revisiting 1989 (and the End of History)
This workshop revisits the tumultuous events of Spring 1989 and the hope and tensions of democratic transitions from authoritarian rule.

Participants:

  • Graham Wilson, US State Department, Office of the Historian
  • Adam Howard, US State Department, Office of the Historian
  • Osamah Khalil, SU History (moderator)

2:00 - 3:30 p.m., Eggers 220
Immigration, Nationalism & Authoritarianism
This roundtable discussion will examine the reactionary policies toward immigration adopted in the United States and Europe.

Participants:

  • Janice Dowell, SU Philosphy
  • Shana Gadarian, SU Political Science
  • Andrew Kim, SU Law
  • Audie Klotz, SU Political Science
  • Jamie Winders, SU Geography


4:00 - 6:00 p.m., Eggers 220
Keynote talk by Jason Stanley (Yale University)
Stanley's address is based on his new book, How Fascism Works.

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4th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2019, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date for our annual showcase celebrating books in the humanities by Syracuse University authors and editors, (copyright 2018).  More info will be posted as it develops!
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Undead Archive: the Speculative Histories of Adam and Zack Khalil

Apr 18, 2019, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison Street

Adam Khalil (filmmaker)
Zack Khalil (filmmaker)

Emerging filmmakers Adam and Zack Khalil present recent works, including their acclaimed debut INAATSE/SE/, which re-imagines a traditional Anishshinaabe story and explores its resonance through the generations in their indigenous community. Audience Q&A follows the screening, with coordinated exhibition at Urban Video Project.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Now More Than Ever: The Political Urgency of Community Archives

Apr 23, 2019, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Bird Library (room, T.B.D.)

Michelle Caswell (University of California, Los Angeles)
Samip Mallick (South Asian American Digital Archive)

All are welcome to this public lecture. Additional details coming soon.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

How to Tell Your Community's Story

Apr 24, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Michelle Caswell (University of California, Los Angeles)
Samip Mallick (South Asian American Digital Archive)

In follow up to their public lecture, Caswell, associate Professor of Archival Studies, and SAADA Executive Director, Samip Mallick host a focused workshop on community archiving.  To RSVP, contact Tarida Anantachai by April 17 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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