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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Music, Environmental Activism, and their Limits in the Amazonian Pilgrimage of the Forest

Nov 27, 2017, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

307 Bowne

Darien Lamen (Bowdoin College)

This public talk with ethnomusicologist and ethnographic filmmaker Lamen, is organized by CNY Humanities Corridor working group, "MMH21 Mobilizing Music."

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Black Feminists and the Transformation of American Public Life

Nov 27, 2017, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, 140 Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

Johnnetta Betsch Cole
Paula J. Giddings
Beverly Guy-Sheftall

Join us for an evening of conversation with three renowned Black feminists: Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Paula J. Giddings, and Beverly Guy-Sheftall (PICTURED: Cole, Giddings, Sheftall). The acclaimed trio will draw from their collective expertise as scholars, educators, and leaders to discuss a variety of topics, including: collaborating as a transformative praxis; pursuing personal, institutional, and political change; and connecting contemporary struggles to combat injustice to a range of pivotal black feminist “history lessons,” from the road to abolition and suffrage to current coalitions such as #SayHerName. A reception and book sale will follow the keynote.

Download the event flier here.

Notes about the presenters:

Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Senior Consulting Fellow at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Principal Consultant at Cook Ross, President Emerita of Spelman College and Bennett College

BIO:
Before assuming her current position, Betsch Cole served for eight years as the Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) -- the only national museum in the United States dedicated to the collection, exhibition, conservation and study of the arts of Africa.  Dr. Cole was given the title of Director Emerita upon her retirement from the museum in March, 2017.  She attended Fisk University in the early entrance Basic College Program.  She went on to Oberlin College where she received her undergraduate degree.  Her Masters and Ph.D. in anthropology with a specialization in African Studies were received from Northwestern University. 

Dr. Cole has held teaching and administrative positions in anthropology, women’s studies and African American studies at Washington State University, UCLA, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Hunter College and Emory University.  She has written and edited numerous publications for scholarly and general audiences, including Conversations: Straight Talk With Americas Sister President; All American Women: Lines That Divides, Tides That Bind; With Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities; and with Rudolph P. Byrd and Beverly Guy-Sheftall, I Am Your Sister, Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde.

In 1987, when Cole was appointed to the presidency of Spelman College, she was the first African American woman to hold that position.  During her presidency, Spelman was named the top liberal arts college in the south.  In 2002, she was appointed to the presidency of Bennett College.  During that presidency, an Africana women’s studies program was launched.  Dr. Cole is the only individual to have served as the president of the only two historically Black colleges for women in the United States. 

Cole was the first African American to serve as the chair of the board of United Way of America.  She formerly served on the corporate boards of Home Depot, Merck and Nation’s Bank South, and was the first woman to serve on the board of Coca-Cola Enterprises.  She currently serves on the board of Martha’s Table, an organization in Washington, DC that provides support for children, families and communities.

From 2015 to 2016, Dr. Cole was the president of the Association of Art Museum Directors.  Cole currently co-chairs the American Alliance of Museum’s Working Group on Diversity, Equity, Accessibility and Inclusion.  She is a fellow of the American Anthropological Association and a member of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Cole has received numerous awards and is the recipient of 68 honorary degrees.  Throughout her career, she has addressed issues concerning Africa and the diaspora.  And in her published work, speeches, and community service, she speaks to issues of racial, gender and all other systems of inequality.  

Paula J. Giddings, E. A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita, Afro-American Studies, Smith College

BIO:
Before attaining her current position at Smith, Giddings taught at Spelman College, where she was a United Negro Fund Distinguished Scholar; Douglass College/Rutgers University as the Laurie Chair in Women’s Studies; and Princeton and Duke Universities.

Giddings is the author of When and Where I Enter: The Impact on Black Women on Race and Sex in America; In Search of Sisterhood, Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement; Burning All Illusions, (editor) an anthology of articles on race published by the Nation magazine from 1867 to 2000; and Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. When and Where I Enter (1984) was called “a landmark study destined to become a prime sourcebook” by Publisher’s Weekly; “the best interpretation of Black women and race and sex that we have” by the Women’s Review of Books; and “a jarringly fresh interpretation” by the New York Times Book Review. The book has been translated into Japanese and Dutch and is used widely in college courses throughout the country. The Washington Post called In Search of Sisterhood (1988) “a fitting sequel to [Ms. Giddings] acclaimed first book.” The Los Angeles Times noted that it “succeeds as a detailed study of an organization that has touched the lives of some of the most prominent Black women in America.” Ida, A Sword Among Lions (2008) received the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award among many other accolades.

Giddings is also a former book editor at Random House and Howard University Press; a magazine editor and journalist who has written on national and international issues for the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jeune Afrique (Paris), The International Herald Tribute, and The Nation among other publications. From 1975 to 1977, she was the Paris Bureau Chief for Encore American & Worldwide News, where she covered international issues, many of them in Africa, and was a member of the press corps for President Jimmy Carter’s first trip abroad to Europe, India and the Middle East. During the period, Ms. Giddings interviewed such world leaders as Leopold Senghor (Senegal); Idi Amin (Uganda); Winnie Mandela, Helen Suzman, Robert Sobukwe (South Africa); and Forbes Burnham (Guyana) among others.

Giddings has been awarded fellowships by the Guggenheim Foundation; the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina; and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (unfulfilled). She has also been awarded Honorary Doctorates from Wesleyan University and Bennett College , and was named a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar. Ms. Giddings is also the recipient of the Osceola Award for Excellence in the Arts from Delta Sigma Theta, Inc; the Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, and the Anna Julia Cooper Award from Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women published by Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. In 2016, was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

She is a member of P.E.N., a writers’ group; The Century Association; Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, the Coalition of 100 Black Women, and serves on the boards of the Nation Institute and the Authors’ Guild Foundation.

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women’s Studies and English and Founding Director, Women’s Research and Resource Center, Spelman College, Adjunct Professor at Emory University’s Institute for Women’s Studies 

BIO:

Besides being one of the founding directors of the Women’s Research and Resource Center (1981) and Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women’s Studies at Spelman College, Guy-Sheftall spent many years as a visiting professor at Emory University where she taught doctoral seminars in Women’s Studies. At age sixteen, she entered Spelman, where she majored in English and minored in secondary education. After graduating with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English. In 1968, she entered Atlanta University to pursue a master’s degree in English; her thesis was entitled, “Faulkner’s Treatment of Women in His Major Novels.” A year later, she began her first teaching job in English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama. In 1971, she returned to Spelman and joined the English Department.

She has published a number of notable texts in African American and Women’s Studies, including the first anthology on Black women’s literature, Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature (Doubleday, 1980), coedited with Roseann P. Bell and Bettye Parker Smith; her dissertation, Daughters of Sorrow: Attitudes Toward Black Women, 1880-1920 (Carlson, 1991); Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought (New Press, 1995); Traps: African American Men on Gender and Sexuality (Indiana UP, 2001), an anthology co-edited with Rudolph Byrd; Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities (Random House, 2003), co-authored with Johnnetta Betsch Cole; I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde, an anthology co-edited with Rudolph Byrd and Johnnetta Cole (Oxford UP, 2009); Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women’s Studies (Feminist Press, 2010), an anthology co-edited with Stanlie James and Frances Smith Foster; and Who Should Be First: Feminists Speak Out on the 2008 Presidential Campaign (SUNY Press, 2010), an anthology co-edited with Johnnetta Cole. In 1983, she became founding co-editor of Sage: A Scholarly Journal of Black Women which was devoted exclusively to the experiences of women of African descent. She is the past president of the National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) and was recently elected to the National Academy of Arts and Sciences (2017).


Event partners:

  1. The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, with a generous gift from University Trustee Christine Larsen ('84)
  2. Council on Diversity and Inclusion

Co-Sponsors:

  1. African American Studies
  2. College of Arts & Sciences
  3. History
  4. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  5. Office of Equal Opportunity, Inclusion, and Resolution Services
  6. Office of Multicultural Affairs
  7. Political Science
  8. Public Administration and International Affairs
  9. School of Education
  10. Sociology
  11. Women's and Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Music and Food in Multicultural Syracuse: Performing New American Traditions

Dec 2, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:30 PM

Grant Auditorium (concert); Wildhack Room (reception) in White Hall / Falk College

6-7:30 p.m. - Concert in Grant Auditorium (White Hall, Falk College)
7:30-8:30 p.m. - Reception in Wildhack Room

Francis Faida and Family (Burundi)
Immaculee Kandathe
(Congo)
Matupi Chin and Karen Dancers
(Burma)
Bhakta Ghalley and Friends (Nepal/Bhutan)
Ahmad Alkhlef and Friends (Syria)
Shwe HninSi (Chef, With Love, Burma)

All are welcome to celebrate this unique collaboration between the departments of Art & Music Histories in the College of Arts and Sciences, the Food Studies Program of Falk College, and With Love Restaurant -- the culmination of students’ work with musicians and chefs from Syracuse’s diverse refugee communities over the course of the semester. The evening begins with an eclectic concert of music and dance traditions from around the world.

Students studying the traditions of and issues faced by immigrant and refugee communities in Syracuse team up with students exploring cultural foodways and political/social histories of Burma to participate in a hands-on workshop with Burmese chef Shwe HninSi, preparing food for this event. "Music and Food in Multicultural Syracuse" serves not only as a showcase of refugees’ traditions as practiced in Syracuse but also as a folk festival in miniature to educate us all about our new American neighbors.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence Against Marginalized Communities

Dec 4, 2017, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Melissa Adler (University of Kentucky)

Systems of classification exist across every field, from biological taxonomies to library shelves. These systems reflect the values of their creators and exert power in defining relationships of belonging. Using classifications as primary historical texts and conceptualizing them as systems that organize state and cultural discourses, Adler will discuss some of the processes by which the marginalization of queer and racialized subjects becomes systemic, and ways that critical analysis reveals possibilities for organizing otherwise. Interdisciplinary fields, such as critical animal studies, disability studies, queer studies, and critical race studies are deeply invested in the critique and production of taxonomies and language, and while they share similar histories of oppression, their subjects push the limits of classifications in unique and compelling ways.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Taxonomic Repair Work

Dec 5, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

Melissa Adler (University of Kentucky)

Melissa Adler follows her public lecture with a focused workshop on how classification systems -- from biological taxonomies to library organization systems -- reflect the values of their creators and exert power, especially over marginalized subjects. Please RSVP to Rachel Clark by November 28; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Info Session: Applying for New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellowships for 2018-19

Dec 8, 2017, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Announcing the Call for Applicants for the 2018-19 Public Humanities Graduate Fellowship program, a shared initiative of the Humanities Center and the CNY Humanities Corridor, in partnership with Humanities New York

At this jointly-hosted information session, current and former fellows will be on site to talk about the fellowship and answer questions. Light breakfast will be available.​  Download the event flier here.

More about the fellowships:

  • At Syracuse University, the program is open to graduate students pursuing a PhD in Anthropology, Composition & Cultural Rhetoric, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Cultural Foundations of Education, or Literacy in Education. It is also open to graduate students pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing or in VPA (3-year MFA programs only).
  • Each year, Syracuase University is granted two fellowships. Learn more about our current and prior fellows.
  • The Call for Applications sheet is available under the FORMS page of this website. There, you will also find the HNY link to apply for the fellowship program.​
  • Questions can be sent to Humanities New York Program Officer Adam Capitanio, 212-233-1131.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Theatre of the Mind: Staging Mental Health & Sense of Belonging

Jan 28, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:15 PM

Syracuse Stage, 820 East Genesee Street

Christian DuComb (Colgate University)
Rebecca Garden (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Carole Hayes Collier (AccessCNY)
Bob Hupp (Syracuse Stage)
David Keith (SUNY Upstate Medical University)

The rock musical Next to Normal (winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama) tells the story of a suburban mother who suffers and struggles with worsening bipolar disorder and the impact her illness and the efforts to alleviate it have on her family. Next to Normal tackles issues of grieving a loss, suicide, drug abuse, and the ethics of modern psychiatry, which will be discussed further in the after-show panel.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Bodymap: A Performance with Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Feb 7, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

304AB Schine Student Center

a photo related to the event

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

Lambda Award winning queer disabled Sri Lankan/Irish femme writer and performance artist Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha will share new work and performance pieces from her work with disability justice collective Sins Invalid and her most recent books, Bodymap and Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home. Piepzna-Samarasinha maps luscious and vulnerable terrains of queer femme of color transformative love, survivorhood, sick and disabled queer of color genius and all the homes we claim, make and deserve. Book signing and Q and A to follow.

NOTE: Please refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, essential oils or other products with fragrance.

BIOGRAPHY: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer, educator and disability and transformative justice organizer. The Lambda and ALA Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she co-founded and co-directed QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili from 2005-2015. A lead artist with disability justice performance troupe Sins Invalid, she is currently finishing her new book of essays, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Culture and book of poetry, Tonguebreaker.


Additional supporters:

  1. Douglas P. Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series
  2. Harry S. and Elva K. Ganders Lecture Series
  3. Disability Cultural Center
  4. Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  5. South Asia Center
  6. LGBT Studies
  7. Office of Multicultural Affairs
  8. LGBT Resource Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

No Body Left Behind: The Art and Practice of Disability Justice

Feb 8, 2018, 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

319 Sims Hall

a photo related to the event

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

Participants in this workshop will learn about disability justice - a movement building framework centering the leadership of Black and brown, queer and trans and other disabled folks marginalized within mainstream movements. Piepzna-Samarasinha talks about disability and accessibility in communities and movements, examines performance and writings by disabled queer and/or people of color artists, shares and builds concrete tools to create spaces that center disabled genius and access.  RSVP to Mike Gill by January 31 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Participants should refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, essential oils or other products with fragrance.

BIOGRAPHY: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer, educator and disability and transformative justice organizer. The Lambda and ALA Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she co-founded and co-directed QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili from 2005-2015. A lead artist with disability justice performance troupe Sins Invalid, she is currently finishing her new book of essays, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Culture and book of poetry, Tonguebreaker.


Additional supporters:

  1. Douglas P. Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series
  2. Harry S. and Elva K. Ganders Lecture Series
  3. Disability Cultural Center
  4. Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  5. South Asia Center
  6. LGBT Studies
  7. Office of Multicultural Affairs
  8. LGBT Resource Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Los Millonarios

Feb 12, 2018, 7:00 PM-10:00 PM

Schine Underground Theater

Chilean Theater group Teatro La María performs the play Los Millonarios (The Millonaires) in Spanish with English subtitles.

Inspired by an actual event in rural Chile, the play constructs a frame which highlights racism toward indigenous peoples in Chile, but also raises questions about the increasing violence toward and marginalization of the middle class throughout the world as increasing numbers of millionaires rise to political power in many countries.  The play has been performed several times in Chile as well as in Peru and Portugal.  This public performance in Syracuse will be its U.S. debut. 

While touring central New York, Teatro La María plans to perform Los millonarios a second time at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and El Hotel, at SUNY Oswego

This free, public performance is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Understanding Chilean Theater in a Global Context

Feb 13, 2018, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

The actors and director of Teatro La María meet with interested students, faculty and community members to talk about Latin American theater and performance as a “text” and discuss strategies for “reading” and understanding Latin American, specifically Chilean, theater in a global context. 

NOTE: this open public discussion is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Women's Roles in Latin American Theater

Feb 15, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

The actors and director of Teatro La María meet with interested students, faculty and the general public to discuss women’s roles as playwrights, directors and actors in Chilean and Latin American theater. Part of the conversation focuses on how their theater has raised consciousness about discrimination and corruption and fostered social change.

This talk a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Music, Identity, and Belonging

Feb 26, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

Tracy Hamlin (Singer, songwriter)
Kal Alston
(Community Folk Art Center), moderator
Theo Cateforis (Art & Music Histories)
Jeff Welcher (Visual & Performing Arts)

Renowned jazz and R&B singer, songwriter, recording artist, producer and music entrepreneur, Tracy Hamlin joins this panel of scholars in conversation to explore connections between music and identity, reflect on how music can promote social/cultural understanding, and to examine how music draws on diverse cultural histories, especially through new technology. Best known for her work with Pieces of a Dream and Gloria Gaynor, Hamlin's visit to Syracuse includes a CNY Jazz sponsored performance at the historic Marriott Syracuse Downtown over the weekend followed by this panel discussion on campus.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Akin: Embedding as Artistic Strategy

Mar 8, 2018, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium, 401 Harrison Street

Eva Marie Rødbro (Copenhagen)
Keren Shavit (Light Work)

The public is invited to this screening and reception.

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Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities in residence

Mar 19, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

complete schedule T.B.A.

a photo related to the event

Susan Schweik (University of California - Berkeley)

Watch this space for a developing schedule of campus and community activities involving this year's Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor, Susan Schweik. An overarching theme for Professor Schweik's visit (March 19-30) is "Bodies of Evidence: Representing Injustice, Confinement, and Incarceration."

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists. 


BIOGRAPHY: Susan Schweik is Professor of English at the University of California Berkeley, where she has worked since 1984. She is the author of The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (NYU, 2009) and A Gulf So Deeply Cut: American Women Poets and the Second World War (1991) and is completing a book tentatively titled Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don’t Know It.  She served as Associate Dean of Arts and Humanities at UCB from 2007-2015 and has just returned to that position.  She is a recipient of Berkeley’s Chancellor's Award for Advancing Institutional Excellence and its Distinguished Teaching Award, and the University of California’s Presidential Chair in Undergraduate Education. Schweik has been involved with the development of disability studies at Berkeley for over twenty years. She was co-coordinator of the Ed Roberts Fellowships in Disability Studies post-doctoral program at Berkeley (coordinated by the Institute for Urban and Regional Development). She is co-founder and co-director of Berkeley’s Disability Studies minor and has been very actively involved in the advanced Disability Studies Research Cluster in Berkeley’s Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Zine Librarianship as Critical Practice

Apr 5, 2018, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seizing the Means of Publication: Zine Making

Apr 6, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 002, Bird Library

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Colleen Kattau on the Latin American New Song Movement

Apr 12, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Colleen Kattau (SUNY Corland)

Singer, songwriter, and SUNY Cortland Associate Professor of Spanish, Colleen Kattau, presents a lecture and performance on the Latin American New Song movement.

This free, public session is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Longing and Belonging: A Conversation on Poetics

Apr 13, 2018, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Christine Kitano
Sean Thomas Dougherty

The YMCA Downtown Writers Center hosts this mini-seminar prior to an evening of readings featuring acclaimed poets, Kitano and Dougherty.  Each discusses how community -- and the lack of, or a yearning for community -- informs the practice of creating poems. Both writers have published important works that address this year’s Symposium theme of "Belonging."  This session is specifically targeted at serious writers and writing teachers; invited guests include advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, creative writing MFA students from the University, and faculty members from both programs.

Space is limited: please RSVP by April 6 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.



CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Naming What is Left Behind

Apr 13, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

Sean Thomas Dougherty
Christine Kitano

Acclaimed poets Christine Kitano and Sean Thomas Dougherty read new poems addressing "Belonging" through themes such as immigrant experience, incarceration, economic disenfranchisement, illness, and violence.  This free public event is hosted by the YMCA Downtown Writers Center.



CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”
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3rd Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date, and check back as details develop for the Humanities Center's annual celebration of Syracuse University authors (copyright 2017)!
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Does the Earth Belong to Us, or Do We Belong to the Earth? Buddhism and the Ecological Challenge

Apr 19, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

David Loy (Boulder, CO)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Healing Ecology: A Buddhist Perspective on the Eco-Crisis

Apr 20, 2018, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Workshop with author, professor, Zen teacher David Loy
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