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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Narrating Personal, Familial, and Historical Silences

Mar 27, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

UPDATE: This workshop has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories

Lauret Savoy (Mount Holyoke)

Additional supporters:

  • Earth Sciences K. Douglas Nelson Lecture Series
  • Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility Offices of the Provost and Chancellor
  • Religion
  • The Graduate School
  • The SOURCE
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Political Listening: The Forensic Turn in Art and Architecture

Mar 27, 2020, 5:15 PM-7:15 PM

214 Slocum Hall Auditorium

a photo related to the event

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories. 

Ana Naomi deSousa (London, England)

In this screening and talk, filmmaker Ana Naomi de Sousa discusses her experience as a research fellow with Forensic Architecture working on the Saydnaya project, which used "ear-witness" testimony of survivors of Syria’s infamous Saydnaya prison to reconstruct its architecture. The lecture will be accompanied by screenings, including excerpts from Saydnaya and Lawrence Abu Hamdan’s Walled Unwalled

This event is held in conjunction with the exhibition Lawrence Abu Hamdan: Walled Unwalled at Urban Video Project’s architectural projection venue on the north façade of the Everson Museum every Thursday-Saturday from dusk to 11pm February 13 - March 28, 2020.


Biography: Ana Naomi de Sousa is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and writer whose work addresses history, spatial politics and identity. Her documentaries include The Architecture of Violence (2013), Angola - Birth of a Movement (2012), and Hacking Madrid (2015). As a collaborator with Forensic Architecture, she was the filmmaker on the 2016 Saydnaya project. She has written for The Funambulist, The Guardian and Al Jazeera English, among others. Her latest short, about a rainforest conservation project led by women in Ecuador, aired on Al Jazeera English in February 2020 as part of the Women Make Science series. 


Additional supporters:

  • Light Work UVP
  • School of Architecture
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Department of Transmedia
  • SI Newhouse School of Communications | Television, Radio, Film
  • Everson Museum of Art
  • Peter A. Horvitz Endowed Chair in Journalism Innovation
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Seeing Drawing as Meditation

Mar 30, 2020, 10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories. We hope to re-offer this workshop in Fall '20.


Bradford C. Grant
(Howard University)

In this experiential workshop, Grant provides participants with materials and guidance in carefully seeing the world by drawing what we really see, verses scribing what we know or think we see to encourage reflection, understanding and transformational change. This workshop is ideal for beginners as well as those experienced with sketching and drawing and focuses on the silent process of seeing and knowing rather than the resulting sketch. The workshop aims to provide the participants a way of acknowledging and promoting positive personal and community change.

Additional supporters:

  • Center for Learning and Student Success
  • Falk College
  • Vice President for the Student Experience, Robert Hradsky
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Diversity Office
  • Student-Athlete Academic Support
  • School of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Contemplative Collaborative

Bio: Bradford C. Grant is a Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, Washington DC. He has been in leadership roles at Hampton and Howard Universities as Chairperson, Director, Associate Dean and Interim Dean. As a registered architect and educator he has extensive experience in community design and contemplative practices in design education. Grant is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), a former board member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), past chair of the Humanities DC and the current board president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

Grant holds a Masters of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and the undergraduate first professional degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Seeing, Drawing, Silence

Mar 30, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories. We hope to reschedule this lecture in Fall '20.

 

Bradford C. Grant (Howard University)

In this public presentation, Grant calls upon his experience as professor of Architecture and former president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society to explore and discuss the way that drawing is not only a visual means of describing and communicating but is also a foundation to seeing the world and oneself as a way of mindfulness and reflection. Seeing the world honestly is far more than just looking at the world. The presentation centers on how Seeing is enhanced by drawing, how Drawing awakens understanding and spikes the imagination of Silence as the sound of seeing. Grant links Seeing, Drawing, Silence to self-awareness, and transformational personal and social change.

Additional supporters:

  • Center for Learning and Student Success
  • Falk College
  • Vice President for the Student Experience, Robert Hradsky
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Diversity Office
  • Student-Athlete Academic Support
  • School of Visual and Performing Arts
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • The Contemplative Collaborative

Bio: Bradford C. Grant is a Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, Washington DC. He has been in leadership roles at Hampton and Howard Universities as Chairperson, Director, Associate Dean and Interim Dean. As a registered architect and educator he has extensive experience in community design and contemplative practices in design education. Grant is past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), a former board member of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), past chair of the Humanities DC and the current board president of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

Grant holds a Masters of Architecture from the University of California Berkeley and the undergraduate first professional degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA.

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CANCELED: Comedy Night: Stand-Up Spectacular

Apr 3, 2020, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Winnick Hillel Center for Jewish Life, 102 Walnut Place

UPDATE: This activity may go 'virtual,' in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories. Contact Ken Frieden for information.


Stephen Rosenfield
(American Comedy Institute)

Rosenfield, Founder and Director of the American Comedy Institute in Manhattan, wraps up a series of classroom visits and coaching sessions with an evening of stand-up and sketches, developed with students from Ken Frieden's "Jewish Humor and Satire" course.

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts and Sciences: Jewish Studies Program and Tolley Professorship
  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence

 

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CANCELED: Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Apr 6, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

UPDATE: This year's residency has been suspended in response to evolving COVID-19 precautions and advisories. We hope to reschedule some of these sessions in Fall '20.

 

"Week 1" [March 9-13] schedule includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception for Professor Winn

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing: Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (recorded for future viewing)

Wednesday, March 11 - Decolonizing Research, Humanizing Methods (CANCELED)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle (CANCELED)

Friday, March 13 - Building Connections: Grad Student Talkback (CANCELED)

 

"Week 2" [April 6-10] schedule CANCELED:

Monday, April 6 - Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration (interdisciplinary panel featuring Cati de los Ríos, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday 7- Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Lawrence "Torry" Winn, Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research? (discussions led by Winn and TJE colleagues)

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle (dialogue about how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices)


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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CANCELED: Too Creative for Science

Apr 6, 2020, 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories. 

Ahna Skop (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Have you ever wondered what it is like to grow up in a family of artists and then end up a scientist? What does thinking like an artist offer the scientist? Can the blending of art and science encourage a more diverse population of students to pursue science, and improve the public understanding of science? Skop gives us an exciting glimpse into her life and how she has impacted science, education and the public with her two passions: science and art.

Additional supporters:

  • WiSE
  • Department of Biology
  • Norma Slepecky Memorial Lecture
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CANCELED: Teaching and Learning in an Age of Mass Incarceration

Apr 6, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

UPDATE: This year's residency has been suspended in response to evolving COVID-19 precautions and advisoriesWe hope to reschedule some of Winn's sessions in Fall '20.

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Erika Bullock (UW Madison)
Cati de los Ríos (UC Davis)

What does it mean to teach and learn in an age of mass/hyper-incarceration? Countering how multiply-marginalized students and their families continue to be criminalized, panelists share teaching strategies drawing on transformative justice paradigms across disciplines and stages of education. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

 

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CANCELED: Restorative Justice Community Circles

Apr 7, 2020, 9:00 AM-7:15 PM

(choose from session times and locations below)

UPDATE: This year's residency has been suspended in response to evolving COVID-19 precautions and advisoriesWe hope to reschedule some of these sessions in Fall '20.

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (Co-Founder/Co-Director, Transformative Justice in Education Center, UC Davis)
Vanessa Segundo (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)
Adam D. Musser (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)

Members of the Transformative Justice in Education Center offer workshops introducing communication strategies for restorative justice work and tools for generating critical dialogues about race, class, gender, ability, and privilege.

Two morning sessions offered at 304 Tolley Humanities Building:

  • 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
  • 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Two afternoon sessions offered at Café Sankofa Cooperative, 2323 South Salina Street:
  • 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • 5:15 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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CANCELED: Research Roundtables: How Can a Transformative Justice Impulse Inform Our Research?

Apr 8, 2020, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

UPDATE: This year's residency has been suspended in response to evolving COVID-19 precautions and advisoriesWe hope to reschedule some of these sessions in Fall '20.

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Lawrence (Torry) Winn (Co-Founder/Co-Director, Transformative Justice in Education Center, UC Davis)
Vanessa Segundo (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)
Adam D. Musser (PhD Candidate – Language, Literacy and Culture, TJE Researcher, UC Davis)

Members of the Transformative Justice in Education Center facilitate roundtable discussions focused on methods and theories for humanizing research. Topics include the California School Discipline Project, the Black Child Legacy Campaign, the Black Parent Survey Project, writing workshops in youth detention centers, and the role of campus student centers. Please contact Kristen Krause by March 25 with any accommodation requests.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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CANCELED: Restorative Justice Pedagogies Book Circle

Apr 9, 2020, 12:00 PM-1:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

UPDATE: This year's residency has been suspended in response to evolving COVID-19 precautions and advisoriesWe hope to reschedule some of these sessions in Fall '20.

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)
Marcelle Haddix (Syracuse University)
Carol Fadda (Syracuse University)

Centered on Winn’s Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom, Haddix (Dean's Professor & Department Chair, Reading and Language Arts Center and Co-Director of The Lender Center for Social Justice) and Fadda (Associate Professor, English; Middle Eastern Studies affiliate) join Winn to discuss how restorative justice can inform course design and classroom practices. CART provided.


Biography: Maisha T. Winn is Professor, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at UC Davis. Winn’s research examines the intersectionality of language, literacy, and justice with attention to how to prepare teachers to “teach freedom” in both spaces of confinement and across the humanities. She considers the ways in which restorative justice practices have the potential to change languages, literacies, and social relations across our schools, institutions, and communities. Winn will draw from two of her books—Justice on Both sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice and Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom—as bases for discussion with TJE Center collaborators and other panelists during her residency.


Additional supporters:

  • Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
  • Community Folk Art Center
  • David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
  • Department of African American Studies
  • Department of English
  • Department of Religion
  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Incarceration and Decarceration/Revival Cultures Working Group of the CNY Humanities Corridor
  • Office of Community Engagement
  • PARCC (Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration)
  • Reading and Language Arts
  • School of Education
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • The Center for Faculty Leadership and Professional Development
  • The Lender Center for Social Justice
  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • The Renée Crown University Honors Program
  • VPA, Office of the Dean, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This event is part of the 2020 Watson Professor residency hosted by Patrick W. Berry, Associate Professor and Chair – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; Brice Nordquist, Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies – Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; and Marcelle Haddix, Dean’s Professor and Chair - Reading and Language Arts.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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CANCELED: Feminist Methodologies: Dalit Women's Education in Modern India

Apr 13, 2020, 4:00 PM-7:30 PM

319 Sims Hall

A Graduate Student Workshop (canceled)

Shailaja Paik (University of Cincinnati)

 

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CANCELED: Politics of Performance: Contesting Caste, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Maharashtra (Western India)

Apr 14, 2020, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

Shailaja Paik (University of Cincinnati)

As part of the first Dalit History Month event at Syracuse University, Paik's public lecture focuses on the politics of caste, race, gender and sexuality in India and engages contemporary debates across disciplines in the humanities and the humanistic social sciences. These topics foreground the contributions of Dalit and Transnational Feminist theories on a variety of themes including solidarity practices (within and between Dalit and African American Women), research methods, and the crisis of representation. Paik highlights Dalit feminist thought and histories, as well as drawing connections with interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks such as Transnational Black Feminism and U.S. WOC Feminisms.

Additional supporters:

  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • South Asia Center
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CANCELED: Young Art 2020: Exhibit and Book Release

Apr 18, 2020, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

La Casita Cultural Center; 109 Otisco Street

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories. 

This exhibit opening and children’s book release event celebrates the talents, creativity and accomplishments in visual and language arts by children from local communities and a team of dedicated SU student volunteers who led the Center’s arts and literacy programming this year.

This year's featured book creation is a compilation of children’s (age 8-12) original stories and reflections about Abuelitas (Little Grandmas).

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CANCELED: 5th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 21, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

a photo related to the event

UPDATE: This year's reception has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

The Humanities Center is working with our annual partners to create a digital showcase of Syracuse University authors and editors celebrating humanities-related books released in 2019. Details developing! 

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Syracuse University Bookstore
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Syracuse University Office of Research
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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Festival

Apr 22, 2020, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Life Sciences Atrium / CST

This 3-day event highlights the diversity and strength of research conducted by undergraduates in the humanities and STEM disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Between April 22-24, students will share their work through poster sessions in the Life Sciences Atrium and brief presentations in CST classrooms.

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit and provide questions and feedback.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala on display

Apr 23, 2020, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 23rd and with a closing ceremony at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Architecture
  • SU Art Galleries
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Begins

Apr 23, 2020, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Slocum Hall Atrium

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

An opening program will take place at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 23rd, with observation through the week and a closing event at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Architecture
  • SU Art Galleries
  • Moynihan South Asia Centeron
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Festival

Apr 23, 2020, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Life Sciences Atrium / CST

This 3-day event highlights the diversity and strength of research conducted by undergraduates in the humanities and STEM disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Between April 22-24, students will share their work through poster sessions in the Life Sciences Atrium and brief presentations in CST classrooms.

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit and provide questions and feedback.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Muslim Spaces, Jewish Pasts: Genealogies of the Split Arab / Jew Figure

Apr 23, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

Ella Shohat (New York University)

Shohat argues that the question of the Arab-Jew must be posed in order to address the complex imaginaries of both “the Arab” and “the Jew,” which in contrast to present-day nationalist common sense, must be rearticulated as mutually constitutive categories. Event includes reception and audience Q&A.

Shohat's talk is co-presented by the Ray Smith Symposium in the College of Arts & Sciences.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

CANCELED: HNY Public Humanities Fellows Presentations

Apr 24, 2020, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

Myriam Lacroix (MFA Student in Creative Writing)
Alanna Louise Warner-Smith (PhD Student in Anthropology)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss their experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects. Additional details will be posted soon!

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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Festival

Apr 24, 2020, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Life Sciences Atrium / CST

This 3-day event highlights the diversity and strength of research conducted by undergraduates in the humanities and STEM disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences. Between April 22-24, students will share their work through poster sessions in the Life Sciences Atrium and brief presentations in CST classrooms.

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit and provide questions and feedback.

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Inside the Kilroys List

Apr 27, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Archbold Theater at Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee St.

Dipika Guha (playwright)
Kelundra Smith (G’12, theater journalist)
Robert Hupp (Syracuse Stage)
Katherine McGerr (Dept. of Drama)

Yoga Play author, Guha, talks with panelists about the Kilroys theater collective, known for generating more than 100 professional productions by female, transgender and/or non-binary playwrights since 2014.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

CANCELED: Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala Ends

Apr 29, 2020, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium

UPDATE: This event has been canceled in response to emerging COVID-19 precautions and advisories.

The School of Architecture has invited the monks of Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies to ritually construct and then disassemble a sand mandala dedicated to Chenrezig or Avalokiteshvara, the boddhisatva of compassion. These cultural ambassadors have become well known for the creation of sand mandala exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world.

First opening at 10 a.m. on April 23 and observable throughout the week, a closing event takes place at 1 p.m. on April 29th.

A mandala is a visual prayer as well as a symbolic universe. Each mandala is a sacred mansion, the home of a particular deity, who symbolically represents and embodies qualities like compassion. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, mandalas are created for rituals of initiation in which a highly qualified teacher grants permission to advanced disciples to engage in the meditation practice of a particular Tantric deity. Both the deity, which resides at the center of the mandala, and the mandala itself are recognized as pure expressions of a Buddha’s fully enlightened mind. For the Tibetan Buddhist, the mandala displays the architecture of exaltation, the inspiring three-dimensional ream of Buddhahood, built in a purified imagination. This realm is achieved through a heightened state of clarity and stability of visualization combined with deep insight and a radical transformation of the mind.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Architecture
  • SU Art Galleries
  • Moynihan South Asia Center
  • Department of Art and Music Histories
  • Department of Religion
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