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Learn more about the Research of the Humanities Center's Dissertation Fellows

Jan 26, 2018, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Maria Carson (Ph.D. Candidate, Religion)
T.J. West III (Ph.D. Candidate, English)

Enjoy a refreshment as this year's Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows for 2017-18 talk about their current work:

Gender as an Affective Tool in the Thought of Abraham Joshua Heschel (Maria Carson)
Women are not explicitly discussed in Abraham Joshua Heschel’s 1951 work, The Sabbath. However, a particular kind of affective femininity is central to his larger argument about (Jewish) ritual time and space. This conception of gender as an affective technology illustrates how women in 1950s Jewish America were increasingly concerned with “marketing” Judaism to children and the broader community. Carson argues that to understand this cultural context is to understand how Heschel's work was impacted by the larger American Jewish socio-political landscape.

Paradise Lost: Melancholic Utopia and the Experience of History in Cleopatra (T.J. West III)
In the film Cleopatra (1963), viewers get a sense of hopeful mourning for a brighter future that the film never brings to fruition. The film’s narrative, driven toward failure, suffuses time-stopping, utopian spectacles with the despair of inevitable historical decline. West argues that Cleopatra expresses the profound uncertainties of a Cold War American culture struggling to find its place in history in a time when the future seemed uncertain due the ever-present possibility of atomic war.

Click to download the event flier.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Theatre of the Mind: Staging Mental Health & Sense of Belonging

Jan 28, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:15 PM

Syracuse Stage, 820 East Genesee Street

Christian DuComb (Colgate University)
Rebecca Garden (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Carole Hayes Collier (AccessCNY)
Bob Hupp (Syracuse Stage)
David Keith (SUNY Upstate Medical University)

The rock musical Next to Normal (winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama) tells the story of a suburban mother who suffers and struggles with worsening bipolar disorder and the impact her illness and the efforts to alleviate it have on her family. Scheduled between two Sunday performances, this panel talks about the story's themes of grieving a loss, suicide, drug abuse, and the ethics of modern psychiatry.

NOTE: the panel discussion is free and open to the public; tickets sold separately for performances.

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African American Music and Activism: Vanessa Johnson and World Be Free

Jan 31, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions will combine short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

Sessions are free and open to all, on these last Wednesdays of the month:

  • January 31, "African American Music and Activism: Vanessa Johnson and World Be Free"
  • February 28, "Spoken Word and Activism: Signature Soul"
  • March 28, "Musical Theater and Activism: Dream Freedom Resistance"
  • April 25, "Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau"

Additional supporters:

  1. Art and Music Histories
  2. Latino and Latin American Studies
  3. Women’s and Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Bodymap: A Performance with Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Feb 7, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

304ABC Schine Student Center

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Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

Lambda Award winning queer disabled Sri Lankan/Irish femme writer and performance artist Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha will share new work and performance pieces from her work with disability justice collective Sins Invalid and her most recent books, Bodymap and Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home. Piepzna-Samarasinha maps luscious and vulnerable terrains of queer femme of color transformative love, survivorhood, sick and disabled queer of color genius and all the homes we claim, make and deserve. Book signing and Q and A to follow.

NOTE: Please refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, essential oils or other products with fragrance.

BIOGRAPHY: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer, educator and disability and transformative justice organizer. The Lambda and ALA Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she co-founded and co-directed QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili from 2005-2015. A lead artist with disability justice performance troupe Sins Invalid, she is currently finishing her new book of essays, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Culture and book of poetry, Tonguebreaker.


Additional supporters:

  • Douglas P. Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series
  • Harry S. and Elva K. Ganders Lecture Series
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • South Asia Center
  • LGBT Studies
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • LGBT Resource Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

No Body Left Behind: The Art and Practice of Disability Justice

Feb 8, 2018, 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

319 Sims Hall

a photo related to the event

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

Participants in this workshop will learn about disability justice - a movement building framework centering the leadership of Black and brown, queer and trans and other disabled folks marginalized within mainstream movements. Piepzna-Samarasinha talks about disability and accessibility in communities and movements, examines performance and writings by disabled queer and/or people of color artists, shares and builds concrete tools to create spaces that center disabled genius and access.

ASL will be provided at this workshop. Please RSVP to Mike Gill by January 31 and include requests for other accessibility accommodations.

Participants should refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, essential oils or other products with fragrance.

BIOGRAPHY: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer, educator and disability and transformative justice organizer. The Lambda and ALA Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she co-founded and co-directed QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili from 2005-2015. A lead artist with disability justice performance troupe Sins Invalid, she is currently finishing her new book of essays, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Culture and book of poetry, Tonguebreaker.


Additional supporters:

  • Douglas P. Biklen Landscape of Urban Education Lecture Series
  • Harry S. and Elva K. Ganders Lecture Series
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • South Asia Center
  • LGBT Studies
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • LGBT Resource Center
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REAL Talks: State Violence

Feb 9, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

In a political climate that continues to encourage exclusionary rhetoric and practices, university communities have to grapple with what it means to be truly committed to creating spaces of inclusion and belonging. The nation’s reckoning (or lack thereof) with racial and gendered violence, economic crisis, exclusionary immigration and foreign policies, and social unrest has directly affected university communities, while raising questions about the responsibilities institutions of higher education have in these issues. 

Three "Resisting Exclusion through Activism and Leadership" sessions -- or "REAL Talks" -- are scheduled for February, March, and April (locatons vary), each addressing a different theme:

  • State Violence (February 9), moderated by Biko Mandela Gray, to include topics of policing, police brutality, Black Lives Matter, immigration control, and DACA
  • Economic Injustice (March 2), moderated by Susan Thomas, covering economic matters affecting the student body including student debt, tuition hikes, the GOP tax bill, and the overall neoliberalization of higher education
  • Rape Culture (April 20), moderated by Chris Eng, discussing the prevalence of rape, assault, and harassment on campuses, the significance of the #metoo movement and the Title IX crisis

These lunchtime dialogues are organized and moderated by faculty organizers from Cultural Foundations of Education, Religious Studies, and English with input from existing SU student organizations working to address these specific forms of exclusion.

Due to limited seating, please RSVP to Susan Thomas by February 1; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Los Millonarios

Feb 12, 2018, 6:00 PM-9:00 PM

Schine Underground Theater

Chilean Theater group Teatro La María performs the play Los Millonarios (The Millionaires) in Spanish with English subtitles.

PLEASE NOTE THE REVISED START TIME: 6 p.m.

Inspired by an actual event in rural Chile, the play constructs a frame which highlights racism toward indigenous peoples in Chile, but also raises questions about the increasing violence toward and marginalization of the middle class throughout the world as increasing numbers of millionaires rise to political power in many countries.  The play has been performed several times in Chile as well as in Peru and Portugal.  This public performance in Syracuse will be its U.S. debut. 

While touring central New York, Teatro La María plans to perform Los millonarios a second time at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and El Hotel, at SUNY Oswego

This free, public performance is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Understanding Chilean Theater in a Global Context

Feb 13, 2018, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

The actors and director of Teatro La María meet with interested students, faculty and community members to talk about Latin American theater and performance as a “text” and discuss strategies for “reading” and understanding Latin American, specifically Chilean, theater in a global context. Space is limited; please RSVP to Gail Bulman by February 5. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

NOTE: this open public discussion is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Women's Roles in Latin American Theater

Feb 15, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

The actors and director of Teatro La María meet with interested students, faculty and the general public to discuss women’s roles as playwrights, directors and actors in Chilean and Latin American theater. Part of the conversation focuses on how their theater has raised consciousness about discrimination and corruption and fostered social change. Space is limited; please RSVP to Gail Bulman by February 5. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

This talk a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Music, Identity, and Belonging

Feb 26, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Tracy Hamlin (Singer, songwriter)
Kal Alston
(Community Folk Art Center), moderator
Theo Cateforis (Art & Music Histories)
Jeff Welcher (Visual & Performing Arts)

Renowned jazz and R&B singer, songwriter, recording artist, producer and music entrepreneur, Tracy Hamlin joins this panel of scholars in conversation to explore connections between music and identity, reflect on how music can promote social/cultural understanding, and to examine how music draws on diverse cultural histories, especially through new technology.

Best known for her work with Pieces of a Dream and Gloria Gaynor, Hamlin's visit to Syracuse includes a CNY Jazz sponsored performance Sunday at the historic Marriott Syracuse Downtown (see info below) and a Master Class opportunity on Monday afternoon.

SUNDAY CONCERT (4-8 p.m., 2/25/18)
Eric Darius and Tracy Hamlin
Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga Street, Syracuse
For information, please call 315-479-5299 or email Cathleen O'Brien.

BIOGRAPHY:
Tracy Hamlin began her singing career at age eleven, at the La Fonatine Bleu in Washington DC. She has been traveling the globe as a singer ever since. Her technique is grounded on a substantial education. Hamlin developed classical proficiency and dexterity; learning to sing in French, German, and Italian at the Baltimore School of the Arts and the Peabody Preparatory School of Music.

She has performed with numerous music legends including Carlos Santana, Marcus Miller, Jonathan Butler, and Chaka Khan. She has also toured internationally as lead background vocalist for Gloria Gaynor. She toured internationally as the lead vocalist with the legendary jazz group Pieces of a Dream, and was featured on their Love’s Silhouette (2002) and No Assembly Required (2005) albums.

Hamlin has self-executive produced three solo albums through her own label, DMH Records, LLC: Seasons (2005), Better Days (2009), and This is My Life (2013), which debuted in June 2013, and immediately gained the attention of music lovers globally, hitting the #1 position on the UK Soul Charts.

Tracy teamed up with DJ Spen in 2012 to release a string of successful “house music” singles including “Drive Me Crazy” and “Never Too Much”, #1 downloads on Traxsource, and “Got To Be Strong” a top 10 download. The success of these house singles led to Tracy’s signing with Quantize Recordings. On this label, Tracy has crossed boundaries between Soul, Jazz, R&B and House Music. She has collaborated on Quantize Records with DJ Spen (US), Frank McComb (US), John Khan & Earl TuTu (UK) and Michele Chiavarini (UK).

Tracy Hamlin continually performs at a myriad of venues and festivals. She aspires to continue her development and growth as an artist, and to mentor a new generation of vocalists.


Additional supporters:
CNY Jazz
College of Arts & Sciences
Community Folk Art Center
Department of Art & Music Histories

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Vocal Master Class with Tracy Hamlin

Feb 26, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Community Folk Art Center, 805 East Genesee Street, Syracuse

a photo related to the event

Internationally renowned jazz, soul, and R&B artist Tracy Hamlin concludes her Syracuse visit with a special master class designed to help singers of all ages and backgrounds find their voice. Interested participants should prepare a solo from the Great American Songbook or pop/soul repertoire. Please bring two copies of the lead sheet or keyboard accompaniment, or a mobile phone audio file. Hamlin will briefly work with each singer in front of a small audience, focusing on sound, technique and overall performance. Spectators are welcome!

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, or to register for the limited number of student slots, please contact cfac@syr.edu as soon as possible, and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

NOTE: Tracy will also be part of a panel discussion / performance on campus, February 26th, from Noon-1:30.


Additional supporters for Hamlin's visit:
CNY Jazz
College of Arts & Sciences
Community Folk Art Center
Department of Art & Music Histories

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Spoken Word and Activism: Signature Soul

Feb 28, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions will combine short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

Sessions are free and open to all, on these last Wednesdays of the month:

  •     February 28, "Spoken Word and Activism: Signature Soul"
  •     March 28, "Musical Theater and Activism: Dream Freedom Resistance"
  •     April 25, "Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau"
Additional supporters:
  1.    Art and Music Histories
  2.    Latino and Latin American Studies
  3.    Women’s and Gender Studies
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REAL Talks: Economic Injustice

Mar 2, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

In a political climate that continues to encourage exclusionary rhetoric and practices, university communities have to grapple with what it means to be truly committed to creating spaces of inclusion and belonging. The nation’s reckoning (or lack thereof) with racial and gendered violence, economic crisis, exclusionary immigration and foreign policies, and social unrest has directly affected university communities, while raising questions about the responsibilities institutions of higher education have in these issues.

Three "Resisting Exclusion through Activism and Leadership" sessions -- or "REAL Talks" -- are scheduled for February, March, and April (locatons vary), each addressing a different theme:

  • State Violence (February 9), moderated by Biko Mandela Gray, to include topics of policing, police brutality, Black Lives Matter, immigration control, and DACA
  • Economic Injustice (March 2), moderated by Susan Thomas, covering economic matters affecting the student body including student debt, tuition hikes, the GOP tax bill, and the overall neoliberalization of higher education
  • Rape Culture (April 20), moderated by Chris Eng, discussing the prevalence of rape, assault, and harassment on campuses, the significance of the #metoo movement and the Title IX crisis

These lunchtime dialogues are organized and moderated by faculty organizers from Cultural Foundations of Education, Religious Studies, and English with input from existing SU student organizations working to addressing these specific forms of exclusion.

Due to limited seating, please RSVP to Susan Thomas by February 22; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Design + Activism: Jayne Zweiman, Pussyhat Co-founder

Mar 5, 2018, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Slocum Hall

Designer and artist Jayna Zweiman’s work engages contemporary issues of gender, representation, and how political activism can foster collective engagement. She is one of the co-founders of the Pussyhat Project, which became an icon for the Women’s March in January 2016. This grassroots movement created a ‘sea of pink’ in every city a march was held, creating a visible solidarity for all participants. Zweiman is now working on a new participatory project, Welcome Blanket, focusing on issues of immigration and refugee resettlement. Formally trained as an architect, Zweiman will discuss the influences her architectural and material education have had on her work and its trajectories.

Additional supporters:

1. Geography
2. VPA School of Art
3. Architecture
4. Women's and Gender Studies

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Akin: Embedding as Artistic Strategy in the Experimental Video of Eva Maria Rødbro & Keren Shavit

Mar 8, 2018, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

a photo related to the event

Eva Marie Rødbro (Copenhagen)
Keren Shavit (Brooklyn, NY)

Urban Video Project (UVP) presents AKIN, an evening of work by experimental video artists Keren Shavit and Eva Marie Rødbro, featuring hybrid documentaries in which the filmmakers insert themselves into the intimate interactions of an American family; followed by Q&A and a reception with the artists.

Please note, the event will be held in Watson Theater on the SU campus.

Additional support comes from the Department of Transmedia


ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES:

Keren Shavit is a mixed media artist and curator, living and working in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem and was a selected participant in the documentary workshop at the Leon Schiller National Higher School of Film in Lodz and Sam Spiegel Film School, Jerusalem. Shavit has exhibited, published and screened her work in Israel, New York, Poland, Germany, China, Norway, and Iceland.

Eva Marie Rødbro is a photographer and award-winning maker of short films that explore youth culture in a variety of contexts. She was educated at art academies in Denmark and the Netherlands. Her most recent short We Chose the Milky Way (2015) screened at the 2016 International Film Festival of Rotterdam and at the 2016 Ann Arbor Film Festival, where it won the George Manupelli Founder’s Spirit Award. Her 2010 short, I Touched Her Legs, won The Barbara Aronofsky Latham Award for Emerging Experimental Video Artist at the 49th Ann Arbor Film Festival, Most Inventive Film Award at the Odense Film Festival 2011, and was nominated for the NEW:VISION award CPH:DOX 2010.

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Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities residency begins

Mar 20, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Dates/Times/Locations vary. See the listings below.

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Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

This year's Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor is Susan Schweik. During her residency (March 19-30), Schweik engages students, faculty, and community members in various discussions and activities under an overarching theme of "Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement, and Incarceration."

Tuesday, March 20, 4:30-6 p.m.
Welcome Reception for Susan Schweik
Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Wednesday, March 21, 4:30-6 p.m.
Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don't Know It
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Friday, March 23, Noon-1:30 p.m.
Contested Ethics, Contesting Institutions: Dialogue on Interdisciplinary Research Practice
Peter Graham Scholar Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Monday, March 26, 10:30-11:30 a.m
Meet the Scholar Coffee Hour
300 Tolley Humanities Building (Sainsbury Library)

Tuesday, March 27, 4-5:30p.m.
Here the Diaries End: Intellectual Disability and the Ends of Life Writing
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Thursday, March 29, 4:30-6 p.m.
Disability Justice in the Archives
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Friday, March 30, Noon-2 p.m.
The Poetics of Confinement: A Workshop
Special Collections Research Center (SCRC), Lemke Seminar Room, 6th floor, Bird Library


BIOGRAPHY: Susan Schweik is Professor of English at the University of California Berkeley, where she has worked since 1984. She is the author of The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (NYU, 2009) and A Gulf So Deeply Cut: American Women Poets and the Second World War (1991) and is completing a book tentatively titled Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don’t Know It.  She served as Associate Dean of Arts and Humanities at UCB from 2007-2015 and has just returned to that position.  She is a recipient of Berkeley’s Chancellor's Award for Advancing Institutional Excellence and its Distinguished Teaching Award, and the University of California’s Presidential Chair in Undergraduate Education. Schweik has been involved with the development of disability studies at Berkeley for over twenty years. She was co-coordinator of the Ed Roberts Fellowships in Disability Studies post-doctoral program at Berkeley (coordinated by the Institute for Urban and Regional Development). She is co-founder and co-director of Berkeley’s Disability Studies minor and has been very actively involved in the advanced Disability Studies Research Cluster in Berkeley’s Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society.


The 2018 Watson Professor residency is hosted by Beth Ferri (Professor of Inclusive Education and Disability Studies) and Michael Gill (Assistant Professor of Disability Studies) in the School of Education.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

Additional Supporters:

  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center
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Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don't Know It

Mar 21, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

In 1939, a popular science magazine trumpeted, "Dull Babies Made Normal By Feeble-Minded Girls’ Care: Increase of as Much as 40 Points in IQ Reported.” The article described an experiment by psychologist Harold Skeels in which orphanage toddlers were transferred to the State Institution for the “Mentally Defective” in Glenwood, Iowa to be nurtured by women incarcerated there. Other “contrast” children left behind in the orphanage did worse by any measure. Raising the children in tandem with low-wage women workers who were their attendants, the women of Glenwood developed a radically interdependent kinship model that profoundly (but briefly, and under conditions of domination) called into question the usual terms and stratifications of intelligence, normalcy, cure, and care.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:

Additional Supporters:

  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center
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Contested Ethics, Contesting Institutions: Dialogue on Interdisciplinary Research Practice

Mar 23, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)
Zosha Stuckey (Towson University)
Liat Ben Moshe (University of Toledo)
Cynthia Wu (SUNY Buffalo)

Drawing from Schweik’s work with the International Disability Rights Research Network, an international committee tasked to develop a research ethics protocol for scholarship supporting the goals of the UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled Persons, panelists explore how the principles articulated in this protocol might relate (or not) to historical, humanities, and arts-based research. Panelists will also explore the politics of the archive and research ethics in the context of institutions and carceral contexts.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:

  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center
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Here the Diaries End: Intellectual Disability and the Ends of Life Writing

Mar 27, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

Accounts of published representations of people with Down Syndrome, authored by people with Down Syndrome, usually start, wrongly, in the 1990s. However, scholars and activists at Syracuse University knew better: Douglas Biklen, Chris Kleiwer and Burton Blatt all wrote about the diaries of Paul Scott (published, with heavy editorial framing, in 1965). Schweik draws on Blatt’s A Basic Kit to Confront the Human Disposal Authority to re-read the final section of Scott’s diaries as protest literature and prison writing.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:
  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center
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Musical Theater and Activism: Dream Freedom Resistance

Mar 28, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions will combine short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

Sessions are free and open to all, on these last Wednesdays of the month:

  •     March 28, "Musical Theater and Activism: Dream Freedom Resistance"
  •     April 25, "Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau"
Additional supporters:
  1.    Art and Music Histories
  2.    Latino and Latin American Studies
  3.    Women’s and Gender Studies
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Disability Justice in the Archives

Mar 29, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

Examining the history of Carrie Buck (of the infamous 1927 Supreme Court decision, Buck v. Bell), Schweik highlights contested issues related to re/presenting Carrie Buck and her life as a so-called feebleminded woman. From Oliver Wendell Holmes’ notorious decree that “Three generations of imbeciles are enough,” to trans-disability representations in the made-for-TV movie starring Marlee Matlin, a Deaf actor, to recent performances of Buck by transgender actors, Buck has proven a more malleable figure than essentialist understandings might suggest. Beginning with the politics and ethics of remembering Buck, Schweik explores some archives made and curated by people who were subjected to institutionalization in the first half of the twentieth century. How do we read and find these “impermanent records?"

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series, with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:
  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center
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The Poetics of Confinement: A Workshop

Mar 30, 2018, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM

Lemke Seminar Room, SCRC, 6th floor, Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)
Stephen Kuusisto (SU - Cultural Foundations of Education)

Drawing on the rich archival resources of the Special Collections Research Center, Susan Schweik and SU writer and professor Stephen Kuusisto lead a workshop featuring poetry that takes up or riffs off of archives of confinement and eugenic ideologies. Engaging work by Cecil Giscombe on the Tribe of Ishmael (who were once displayed by eugenicists as "America's Worst Family"), the Blunt Research Group's highly experimental The Work-Shy, and Molly McCully Brown's The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and the Feebleminded, participants will explore how poets contest various states of confinement and incarceration, and perhaps try their hands themselves.

Space is limited; please RSVP by 3/23/18 to baferri@syr.edu, include any accommodations requests.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series, with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:
  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Zine Librarianship as Critical Practice

Apr 5, 2018, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Seizing the Means of Publication: Zine Making

Apr 6, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 002, Bird Library

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)
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Gendered Mobilization, Body Politics and Change in the Middle East

Apr 11, 2018, 12:00 PM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.D.

Nadje Al-Ali (SOAS University of London)

Al-Ali’s talk looks comparatively at women’s mobilization and feminist activism in Iraq, Egypt and Turkey and the Kurdish movement. Drawing upon contemporary events from a feminist perspective engages a range of disciplines. In addition to her scholarship on women, gender, and feminism in the Middle East, Al-Ali is a founding member of Act Together: Women’s Action for Iraq. Her books are frequently used in undergraduate teaching, appreciated for their ethnographic detail and clarity.

BIOGRAPHY: Al-Ali is Chair of the Centre of Gender Studies, SOAS, and the author of Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East: the Egyptian Women’s Movement; Iraqi Women: Untold Stories from 1948 to the Present; and with Nicola Pratt What Kind of Liberation? Women and the Occupation in Iraq.


Additional supporters:

  • Women's & Gender Studies
  • Middle Eastern Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Colleen Kattau on the Latin American New Song Movement

Apr 12, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Colleen Kattau (SUNY Corland)

Singer, songwriter, and SUNY Cortland Associate Professor of Spanish, Colleen Kattau, presents a lecture and performance on the Latin American New Song movement.

Space is limited; please RSVP to Gail Bulman by April 2. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

This free, public session is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Longing and Belonging: A Conversation on Poetics

Apr 13, 2018, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Christine Kitano
Sean Thomas Dougherty

The YMCA Downtown Writers Center hosts this mini-seminar prior to an evening of readings featuring acclaimed poets, Kitano and Dougherty.  Each discusses how community -- and the lack of, or a yearning for community -- informs the practice of creating poems. Both writers have published important works that address this year’s Symposium theme of "Belonging."  This session is specifically targeted at serious writers and writing teachers; invited guests include advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, creative writing MFA students from the University, and faculty members from both programs.

Space is limited: please RSVP by April 6 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.



CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Naming What is Left Behind

Apr 13, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

Sean Thomas Dougherty
Christine Kitano

Acclaimed poets Christine Kitano and Sean Thomas Dougherty read new poems addressing "Belonging" through themes such as immigrant experience, incarceration, economic disenfranchisement, illness, and violence.  This free public event is hosted by the YMCA Downtown Writers Center.



CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”
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Shakespeare’s Poetry: Polluted Bodies in the Sonnets and the Rape of Lecrece

Apr 16, 2018, 9:30 AM-12:30 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Sophie Chiari (Clermont Auvergne University, France)

Professor Chriari leads a seminar on Shakespeare's poetry.  RSVP to dccallag@syr.edu by 4/9 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Additional supporters:

  1. English
  2. Medieval Renaissance Studies working group
  3. History
  4. Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
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The Fated Sky: Climate, Weather and the Environment in Early Modern England

Apr 16, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

place T.B.D.

Sophie Chiari (Clermont Auvergne University, France)

If eco-critical approaches to literary texts receive more and more attention, climate-related issues remain neglected in the field of drama studies. Taking Shakespeare as its starting point, this discussion will focus upon these issues. In particular, it will address the ways that popular and religious beliefs still shaped human relations to meteorological phenomena. Yet, at the same time, a growing number of literati promoted free will rather than determinism and insisted on human ability to act upon celestial forces.

In his plays, Shakespeare tries to reconcile the scientific approaches of his time with more popular ones rooted in superstition and, above all, he promotes a sensitive and pragmatic understanding of meteorological events. The seminar will thus explore the interaction between scientific and popular cultures, the way climatic phenomena could be dealt with on stage and, ultimately, the complex, kaleidoscopic vision of the playwright on the subject. Chiari examines the significance of such a literary and historical investigation of climate to our own pressing concerns about climate change and ecological crisis.


Additional supporters:

  1. English
  2. Medieval Renaissance Studies working group
  3. History
  4. Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
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3rd Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date, and check back as details develop for the Humanities Center's annual celebration of Syracuse University authors (copyright 2017)!
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Does the Earth Belong to Us, or Do We Belong to the Earth? Buddhism and the Ecological Challenge

Apr 19, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

David Loy (Boulder, CO)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Healing Ecology: A Buddhist Perspective on the Eco-Crisis

Apr 20, 2018, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Details coming soon for this workshop with author, professor, Zen teacher David Loy.

Space is limited; please RSVP to Bonnie Shoultz (315-492-6341) by April 11 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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REAL Talks: Rape Culture

Apr 20, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Sharon Haines Jacquet Education Commons, Huntington Hall

In a political climate that continues to encourage exclusionary rhetoric and practices, university communities have to grapple with what it means to be truly committed to creating spaces of inclusion and belonging. The nation’s reckoning (or lack thereof) with racial and gendered violence, economic crisis, exclusionary immigration and foreign policies, and social unrest has directly affected university communities, while raising questions about the responsibilities institutions of higher education have in these issues.

Three "Resisting Exclusion through Activism and Leadership" sessions -- or "REAL Talks" -- are scheduled for February, March, and April (locatons vary), each addressing a different theme:

  • State Violence (February 9), moderated by Biko Mandela Gray, to include topics of policing, police brutality, Black Lives Matter, immigration control, and DACA
  • Economic Injustice (March 2), moderated by Susan Thomas, covering economic matters affecting the student body including student debt, tuition hikes, the GOP tax bill, and the overall neoliberalization of higher education
  • Rape Culture (April 20), moderated by Chris Eng, discussing the prevalence of rape, assault, and harassment on campuses, the significance of the #metoo movement and the Title IX crisis

These lunchtime dialogues are organized and moderated by faculty organizers from Cultural Foundations of Education, Religious Studies, and English with input from existing SU student organizations working to addressing these specific forms of exclusion. 

Due to limited seating, please RSVP to Susan Thomas by April 12; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau

Apr 25, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

105 Life Science Building

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions combines short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

This final gathering in the series features Colleen Kattau on Latin American music and activism. All are welcome.

Additional supporters:

  1.     Art and Music Histories
  2.     Latino and Latin American Studies
  3.     Women’s and Gender Studies
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The Joy of Close Reading in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Apr 27, 2018, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

A Conference in Memory of Hope Glidden

Details coming soon!

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