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Upcoming Events

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Those Unique Survivors Called Books with Irene Vallejo Moreu

Aug 29, 2019, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Independent writer and scholar Irene Vallejo discusses the importance of the printed book as historical documentation of subversive thought. She argues that subversive or controversial political positions were difficult to pass down to younger generations through oral testimony and storytelling, but with the advent of printed materials such thought becomes more readily available, archived and revived.

This public talk will coincide with an art exhibition at Le Moyne College by a Spanish artist who creates examples of historical printed materials such as old newspapers, worn books, etc.  Vallejo's research is focused on History of Books and Reading and her last work is a narrative essay on the subject, El infinito en un junco (Siruela, 2019) which will be published next fall.

For more information, contact Kathy Everly


This event is organized by the LLC13 “Spanish Poetics” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Putting 'Rebecca' on Trial: Daphne du Maurier's Novel and the Negotiation of Genre Replay and Originality in the Dark Female Gothic in 1940s Hollywood

Sep 5, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:15 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Helen Hanson (University of Exeter)

British film scholar and historian Helen Hanson presents this public talk on women and film. For more information, please contact Will Scheibel.


This event is organized by the VAC3 Visual Studies working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Coffee Hour with Sarah Workman - Humanities Proposal Development Director

Sep 11, 2019, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

300 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

Sarah Workman (Proposal Development-Humanities)

Stop by the Humanities Center for a cup of tea or coffee with Workman, newly hired to support faculty seeking and applying for research funding, achievement and recognition opportunities. Positioned as part of both the Office of Research and the College of Arts & Sciences, Sarah’s role supports Humanities research across the University.

Contact the Humanities Center by September 5 with any accessibility requests.

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Forever Orange: The Story of Syracuse University

Sep 13, 2019, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird LIbrary

a photo related to the event

Rick Burton (Falk College, Syracuse University)
Scott Pitoniak (Rochester Business Journal)

Syracuse University alumni Burton (’80) and Pitoniak (’77), authors of Forever Orange, talk about their collaboration commemorating Syracuse University’s 150th anniversary. The book chronicles the diverse people, places and events that have helped Syracuse become an internationally renowned research university. Book sales and signings will also be available. Forever Orange (©2019) was published by the Syracuse University Press.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Bringing Latin to Life: A Teaching Workshop

Sep 20, 2019, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Nancy Cantor Warehouse

Justin Slocum Bailey (Indwelling Language)

This 2-day teaching workshop (Sept. 20-21) aims at exchanging ideas of teaching practices geared toward the foreign language as a target language – in this case with an emphasis on Latin. Slocum Bailey shares best practices and latest developments in the fields of comprehensible input and total body involvement as well as the most recent theoretical insights in modern language acquisition applied onto classical languages.

Please RSVP to Matthieu van der Meer by Sept. 14.


This event is organized by the LLC29 “Bringing Latin to Life: Transforming Latin Pedagogy for Maximal Inclusion and Impcat” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Intersections: Re-Thinking African American Literature and Culture in the 21st Century

Sep 20, 2019, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

010 Eggers

Marquis Bey (Northwestern University)
Chelsea Frazier (Cornell University)
William H. Mosley (University of Texas at Austin)

Scholars of African American studies, English, and gender/sexuality studies talk about their respective areas of research and engage in discussion.

This presentation is jointly supported by the Ray Smith Symposium in the College of Arts & Sciences.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Bringing Latin to Life: A Teaching Workshop

Sep 21, 2019, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Nancy Cantor Warehouse

Justin Slocum Bailey (Indwelling Language)

This 2-day teaching workshop (Sept. 20-21) aims at exchanging ideas of teaching practices geared toward the foreign language as a target language – in this case with an emphasis on Latin. Slocum Bailey shares best practices and latest developments in the fields of comprehensible input and total body involvement as well as the most recent theoretical insights in modern language acquisition applied onto classical languages.

Please RSVP to Matthieu van der Meer by Sept. 14.


This event is organized by the LLC29 “Bringing Latin to Life: Transforming Latin Pedagogy for Maximal Inclusion and Impcat” working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Sculpting Silence

Sep 22, 2019, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Tania León (Brooklyn College)
Roberto Sierra (Cornell University)
Ryan Chase (Colgate)
Brent Michael Davids (Stockbridge-Munsee Community)
Douglas Quin (Newhouse, Syracuse University)

Society for New Music and Newhouse collaborate in presenting this performance of music, evoking some of the quietest places on the planet.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements

Sep 26, 2019, 6:30 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

17th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

(Irene Taylor Brodsky, USA, 2019, 90 min. Captioned in English)

This film builds on Brodsky's powerful first feature, Hear and Now, by delving into an intergenerational exploration of living with deafness. Brodsky’s son Jonas began losing his hearing as a baby and underwent cochlear-implant surgery as a toddler. Now 11 years old, Jonas has adjusted to a world with sound and is learning to play Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. Brodsky’s parents also have cochlear implants, but unlike Jonas, the majority of their lives were shaped by silence. While Jonas explores what silence means to him, his grandfather grapples with a new transition of his own.

Buoyed by a perceptive soundscape and luminous animation, Brodsky astutely captures the complexity of silence and hearing. Rich archival footage portrays Brodsky’s parents’ reflections on the evolution of deafness while intimate home videos reveal Jonas’s hearing transformation. In this deeply personal and moving film, Brodsky explores the meaning of deafness, loss, and the power of silence as her son discovers his unique voice and her parents confront a new chapter of their lives.

Join us for a brief reception before the 7pm screening.

Check festival website for complete details as they develop.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

17th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Sep 26, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Screening locations vary (see individual event dates).

This annual festival -- September 26 – 28 -- explores human rights, worldwide, through documentary and fiction films.

OPENING NIGHT
Thursday, September 26 @ 7 pm, Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3
Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements
(Irene Taylor Brodsky, USA, 2019, 90 min. Captioned in English)
Irene Taylor Brodsky builds on her powerful first feature, Hear and Now, by delving into an intergenerational exploration of living with deafness. 

Friday, September 27 @ 7 pm, Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3
Words from a Bear
(Jeffrey Palmer, USA, 2019, 85 min. Captioned in English)
When N. Scott Momaday won the 1969 Pulitzer Prize, it marked one of the first major acknowledgments of Native American literature and the vibrant contemporary culture it described. Now, Momaday’s transportive words come to life in this cinematic biography of one of the most celebrated Native American storytellers.
Q&A with Filmmaker follows screening.

Saturday, September 28 @ 1 pm, Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building
Everything Must Fall
(Rehad Desai, South Africa, 2018, 85 min. Captioned in English)
In this galvanizing examination of the fight for free higher education, acclaimed documentarian Rehad Desai takes his own alma mater as a case study in a growing intersectional global movement. 

Saturday, September 28 @ 4 pm, Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building
The Silence of Others
(Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar, Spain, 2018, 96 min., Spanish with English subtitles)
In a groundbreaking international court case, victims of re-education camps, child abduction, torture, and extra-judicial killings come together to break their silence and confront perpetrators who, unbeknownst to much of the world, have enjoyed impunity for decades. This story captures the first attempt in 77 years to prosecute crimes of Spain’s 40-year Franco dictatorship (1939-1975). 

CLOSING NIGHT
Saturday, September 28 @ 7 pm, Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building
The Sweet Requiem
(Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, India/USA, 2018, 91 min., Tibetan with English subtitles)
This bold new work from the directors of the award-winning Dreaming Lhasa (2005) is a tale of tragedy, retribution, and courage -- an unforgettable reflection on an ongoing but too often forgotten refugee crisis.
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Cathy Cassady: Rewriting the Beat Generation

Sep 27, 2019, 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Cathy Cassady

Cassady shares stories about her mother and father, Carolyn and Neal Cassady, who were key sources of inspiration in novels like Jack Kerouac’s On the Road and Allen Ginsberg’s poetry. In particular, she will discuss the unpublished poetry, fiction, memoir of her mother that are candid about domestic and workplace abuse that has become more visible in light of the #MeToo Movement.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Words from a Bear

Sep 27, 2019, 6:30 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenham Auditorium, Newhouse 3

17th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

(Jeffrey Palmer, USA, 2019, 85 min. Captioned in English)

When N. Scott Momaday won the 1969 Pulitzer Prize, it marked one of the first major acknowledgments of Native American literature and the vibrant contemporary culture it described. Now, Momaday’s transportive words come to life in this cinematic biography of one of the most celebrated Native American storytellers. In Jeffrey Palmer’s directorial debut, distinctly expressive animations intersect with stunning footage of the Great Plains as Momaday draws from his Kiowa ancestry and identity to pose universal questions about how we connect to our origins, each other, and the earth.

In a series of intimate interviews, Momaday expounds on his life and its many challenges, while insights from the likes of Joy Harjo, Robert Redford, and Jeff and Beau Bridges reveal the impact of his literary contributions. Words from a Bear reveals the inspiring beauty of Momaday’s work while also guiding audiences through the grave historical struggles that Native American communities have faced. The result is a profound celebration of not only Momaday’s writing and history but also the art of storytelling itself. Filmmaker will be present to introduce and discuss the film. 

Joni us for a brief reception before the 7pm screening.

Check festival website for complete details, as they develop.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Everything Must Fall

Sep 28, 2019, 1:00 PM-3:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

17th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

(Rehad Desai, South Africa, 2018, 85 min. Captioned in English)

In this galvanizing examination of the fight for free higher education, acclaimed documentarian Rehad Desai takes his own alma mater as a case study in a growing intersectional global movement. At South Africa’s elite, ivy-covered Wits University, students chanting “Fees Must Fall” held a rally against steep tuition hikes. The cry became a viral social media hashtag. One protest fueled another. The administration called in more than a thousand armed police. Soon, a leading institution of nearly 40,000 students was shut down. Neighboring university students struggling with their own mounting debt joined the cause, which become a national movement marked by escalating conflict and violence. Even after their fight has led to three deaths, 800 arrests and counting, the students are determined to achieve transformational, intergenerational justice and “decolonized,” free higher education, a message increasingly popular around the world.

Check festival website for complete details as they develop.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Silence of Others

Sep 28, 2019, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

17th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

(Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar, Spain, 2018, 96 min., Spanish with English subtitles)

This story captures the first attempt in 77 years to prosecute crimes of Spain’s 40-year dictatorship under General Franco (1939-1975). In a groundbreaking international court case, victims of re-education camps, child abduction, torture, and extra-judicial killings have come together to break their silence and confront perpetrators who, unbeknownst to much of the world, have enjoyed impunity for decades. Through the compelling contemporary story of the case and the personal journeys of several of its plaintiffs, The Silence of Others explores the shadows the past still casts upon the present in Spain. What happens when a country is forced to reckon with its history after many years of silence? What happens to those who have endured – and then dare to break – such silence? Can justice really be done after so long?

Check festival website for complete details, as they develop.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Sweet Requiem

Sep 28, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

17th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

(Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, India/USA, 2018, 91 min., Tibetan with English subtitles)

This bold new work from the directors of the award-winning Dreaming Lhasa (2005) is a tale of tragedy, retribution, and courage. At age eight, Dolkar and her father fled their home in Tibet, escaping Chinese armed forces in an arduous journey across the Himalayas. Now 26, she lives in a Tibetan refugee colony in Delhi, India, where an unexpected encounter with a man from her past reveals long-suppressed memories, propelling Dolkar on an obsessive search for the truth and a reckoning with complex and shifting challenges of exile. With stunning cinematography and skillfully subdued tension, The Sweet Requiem is an unforgettable reflection on an ongoing but too often forgotten refugee crisis.

Check festival website for complete details, as they develop.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

On the Edge of Silence: Ecstatic Utterances and Inspired Breath

Sep 29, 2019, 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Peyman Farzinpour (Ensemble / Parallax Conductor, Artistic Director)
William Robert (Syracuse University Religion)

This multimedia performance by Ensemble / Parallax featuring Setnor School of Music faculty Kathleen Roland-Silverstein includes dialogue, food, and fellowship as part of Hendricks Chapel's "Music and Message" series.

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Liberating Stories of Resistance Along the U.S./Mexico Border

Oct 1, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

319 Sims Hall

Michelle Téllez (University of Arizona)

Téllez has a long history of grassroots community engagement and activism in multiple social justice projects that draw on critical pedagogy, principles of sustainability, community-based arts, performance, and visual media. Her scholarly work focuses on identity, mothering, transnational community formation, cross-border labor organizing, gendered migration, and autonomy and resistance along the U.S./Mexico border.  Her public lecture will draw on recent social justice organizing along the U.S. Mexico border, and focus specifically on women’s narratives of resistance.   

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Widening the Circle: Indigenous Knowledge on the Personhood of All Beings and Justice for the Land

Oct 3, 2019, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities for 2019 presented by Robin S. Kimmerer

Robin Wall Kimmerer (SUNY ESF)

As distinguished guest lecturer for this annual Physics / Humanities Center partnership, author-scholar Kimmerer critically examines the notion of serving "We the People" as the foundation of environmental protection. Who are those People? What does it mean to be a person? She explores the indigenous concepts of personhood and reciprocity as a means to expand the circle of citizenship to include justice for the land.

The Thursday evening lecture is free and open to the public. Kimmerer also leads a focused workshop the following morning, which requires RSVP by 9/20/19.

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Biology
  • Native American Studies
  • Religion
  • Women's and Gender Studies
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Widening the Circle: Workshop with Robin Wall Kimmerer

Oct 4, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Robin Wall Kimmerer (SUNY ESF)

Following her presentation as Kameshwar C. Wali Lecturer in the Sciences and Humanities for 2019, and drawing from her book Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer focuses further on Indigenous wisdom and scientific knowledge.

Space is limited; please RSVP by 9/20/19 to humcenter@syr.edu and include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Biology
  • Native American Studies
  • Religion
  • Women's and Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Words and Silence in Spiritual Inquiry: Going Beyond Opinion and Belief

Oct 7, 2019, 5:30 PM-8:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Wildecy Fatima de Jury (East Bay Meditation Center, New York)
Imani Gayle Gillison (Brooklyn Zen Center, New York)

Gillison and Jury, Buddhist Dharma teachers of color and members of the LGBTQ community, examine uses of silence and suitable speech. Both are crucial in deconstructing oppressive mental and social paradigms. As an example, people in spiritual communities sometimes keep silent about the abusive behaviors of some leaders. Then, this presentation will explore how silence and right speech can help to create communities that cultivate generosity, compassion, forgiveness and unity.

Additional supporters:

  • Contemplative Collaborative
  • Religion Department
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Zen Center of Syracuse
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Small Press Reading Series: A Reading

Oct 9, 2019, 5:30 PM-6:45 PM

004 Bird Library

Joe Pan
Lori Anderson Moseman
Jesi Bender

This Fall 2019 Small Press Reading Series event features readings by three New York State authors with recent small press releases: Joe Pan (Operating Systems, Spork Press 2019), Lori Anderson Moseman (darn, Delete Press, 2019), and Jesi Bender (The Book of the Last Word, Whisk(e)y Tit, 2019).

For more information, contact Patrick Williams.

This event is organized by the Small Press Reading Series (LLC24) working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Photography, Race, and Memory

Oct 11, 2019, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Watson Theater

Nicola Lo Calzo (artist)
Kyle Bass (playwright)

In celebration of his exhibition at Light Work, Bundles of Wood, artist Nicola Lo Calzo presents a lecture on his work followed by a conversation with playwright Kyle Bass, discussing issues of race, memory and the African Diaspora.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Incriminating Silence: How the Unheard Defendant in 12 Angry Men Speaks to Our Now

Oct 13, 2019, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Sutton Pavilion at Syracuse Stage, 820 East Genesee Street

Todd A. Berger (Syracuse University College of Law)
Sanjay Chhablani (Syracuse University College of Law)

All are welcome to this free, public panel discussion scheduled between Sunday performances of 12 Angry Men at Syracuse Stage, focused on issues of race in the American judicial system.

In Reginald Rose's taut and compelling jury room-drama, a 19-year-old man has stood trial for murdering his father. What seems an open-and-shut case is anything but when one of the jurors begins opening other jurors' eyes to the facts. Although never seen or heard -- his absence and silence is his presence -- the dialogue suggests the defendant is a person of color, a "them," an other in the eyes of most of the jury.

This panel discussion with Q&A -- part of this year's Syracuse Symposium on "Silence," -- uses the live theatre performance as a point of departure to discuss systemic race bias in the American criminal justice system and what is gained (or lost) when the object of that bias is silent within the drama.

Panelist bios:

Todd A. Berger joined the College of Law faculty in 2012. He is currently an Associate Professor, serving as Director of Advocacy Programs. Berger's scholarship concentrates in the areas of criminal law and procedure, as well as the intersection of trial advocacy and attorney ethics.

Sanjay Chhablani's teaching and research focusses on criminal law and procedure. His scholarly work has addressed the Sixth Amendment, the right to counsel, the right to jury trial and the death penalty. Chhablani also teaches at the Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute at Syracuse University and collaborates with the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

 

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Queer Terror: Refusing Settler Empire and the 'Value of Life'

Oct 21, 2019, 3:00 PM-3:01 PM

time and location T.B.D.

Heike Schotten (University of Massachusetts-Boston)

Schotten’s lecture draws on her new book, Queer Terror: Life, Death, and Desire in the Settler Colony (Columbia UP, 2018) which mobilizes queer theory and critical indigenous theory to re-think biopolitics in Nietzschean service to challenging the hidden moralisms of “terrorism” discourse, Islamophobia, and US Empire.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
  • LGBT Studies
  • Middle Easter Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TitBits: Breast Cancer Stories

Oct 24, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Documentary theater dramatizes the stories behind breast cancer—patient, survivor, caregiver, medical practitioner, and advocate.

Full schedule of screenings:

  • Thursday, October 24, 7-9 p.m.
  • Friday, October 25, 7-9 p.m.
  • Saturday, October 26, 2-4 p.m.
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Perspectives: Centers, Margins, Boundaries

Oct 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM

exact times and location T.B.A.

This one-day symposium explores the complex relationships between centers and peripheral spaces, as well as boundaries and borders that define our world and how they are represented in literatures and the visual arts. Invited speakers include Burcu Dogramaci, Elizabeth Otto, and Bertrand Westphal.

This event is supported by CNY Humanities Corridor, from an award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TitBits: Breast Cancer Stories

Oct 25, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Documentary theater dramatizes the stories behind breast cancer—patient, survivor, caregiver, medical practitioner, and advocate.

Full schedule of screenings:

  • Thursday, October 24, 7-9 p.m.
  • Friday, October 25, 7-9 p.m.
  • Saturday, October 26, 2-4 p.m.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TitBits: Breast Cancer Stories

Oct 26, 2019, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Documentary theater dramatizes the stories behind breast cancer—patient, survivor, caregiver, medical practitioner, and advocate.

Full schedule of screenings:

  • Thursday, October 24, 7-9 p.m.
  • Friday, October 25, 7-9 p.m.
  • Saturday, October 26, 2-4 p.m.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

'Cripping' Graphic Medicine: Psychiatric Disability, 'Crip' Culture, and the Health Humanities

Oct 29, 2019, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Elizabeth J. Donaldson (NYIT)

Today, graphic memoirs are both popular and acclaimed: for example, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home (2006) is taught in college courses and has been adapted into an award-winning Broadway musical. Yet, when Justin Green published his 40-page autobiographical comic, Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary in 1972, he was breaking new ground and inventing a new form. By reading Binky Brown as a disability memoir, Donaldson argues that psychiatric disability and the empathetic treatment of mental health issues are foundational to this genre. Contemporary graphic memoirs of psychiatric disability are both a legacy of Green’s innovative confessional comics and an extension of his work. For students of disability studies, these graphic texts challenge stereotypes of mental illness and offer important and unique insights into the experiences of people living with madness and psychiatric disability.

This Syracuse Symposium event addresses issues of power in the silencing of disability and the “voices” of those who experience barriers in healthcare and healthcare education and practice. The event also addresses how disabled people’s “voices” are sometimes silenced in Graphic Medicine, the comics industry, and beyond, thus demonstrating why adaptations are necessary to (re)fashion a primarily visual medium so that it is consistently accessible to a spectrum of creators and audiences.

Additional supporters:


Biography: Elizabeth J. Donaldson, who teaches courses in bioethics and American literature and directs a minor in Medical Humanities, draws lines between Graphic Medicine, Disability Studies, and Health Humanities, focused on psychiatric disability.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Drawing Out the Public Sphere: A Workshop on 'Cripping' Graphic Medicine

Oct 30, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Elizabeth J. Donaldson (NYIT)

Using specific examples from a short comic in Daryl Cunningham's Psychiatric Tales, this workshop examines themes of violence alongside representations of mental illness in the larger culture, in order to discuss how comics can amplify or combat stigma.

This Syracuse Symposium workshop addresses issues of power in the silencing of disability and the “voices” of those who experience barriers in healthcare and healthcare education and practice. The session will also explore how disabled people’s “voices” are sometimes silenced in Graphic Medicine, the comics industry, and beyond, thus demonstrating why adaptations are necessary to (re)fashion a primarily visual medium so that it is consistently accessible to a spectrum of creators and audiences.

Space is limited; please RSVP by 10/23 to Rachael Zubal-Ruggieri, 315-443-2156. Include any accessibility accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:


Biography: Elizabeth J. Donaldson, who teaches courses in bioethics and American literature and directs a minor in Medical Humanities, draws lines between Graphic Medicine, Disability Studies, and Health Humanities, focused on psychiatric disability.

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Naming a Transnational Black Feminist Framework

Oct 30, 2019, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

Dr. Kia Melchor Hall (Fielding University)

Situated at the intersection of IR and Black feminist theory and praxis, Hall argues that a Black feminist tradition of engaging the international exists, has been neglected by mainstream IR and can be written into the IR canon using the TBF framework. Using grounded theory research within the Black indigenous Garifuna community of Honduras, as well as the scholarship of Black feminist anthropologists, the Hall focuses on five TBF guiding principles—intersectionality, solidarity, scholar-activism, attention to borders/boundaries, and radically transparent author positionality, offering an Interdisciplinary, critical alternative for engaging IR studies.  Hall’s work is profoundly interdisciplinary, bringing the social sciences (IR) into conversation with the deeply humanistic trajectory of Black feminist theory and politics.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Speaking Truths Unspoken: New Directions and New Voices in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

Nov 1, 2019, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Regina Mills (Texas A&M University)

English hosts this session of research presentations and roundtable discussion with scholars in ethnic studies.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Grief, Healing, and Creative Possibilities

Nov 8, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

Holly Greenberg (Syracuse University VPA)
DJ Hellerman (Everson Museum of Art) 
Brian Konkol (Syracuse University Hendricks Chapel) 
Mary Murray (Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute)

Presented in correlation with the fall 2019 exhibition, Not A Metric Matters, this moderated panel discussion explores the isolating and often silent aspects of death, grief, and remembrance.

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Gandhi in the Gallery: The Art of Disobedience

Nov 13, 2019, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Sumathi Ramaswamy (Duke University)

Mohandas K. Gandhi has been described as “an artist of non-violence,” crafting a set of practices of the self and politics that earned him the mantle of Mahātma, “the great soul.” There is an enormous body of scholarship that has explored and critiqued Gandhi’s philosophy and praxis of satyāgraha, non-violent civil disobedience. Yet what does it mean to think of satyāgraha as an aesthetic regime, and its principal exponent as the paradigmatic artist of disobedience?

In this presentation, prof Ramaswamy sets out to answer these questions with the help of India’s modern artists who have turned to the Mahātma as their muse over the past century, but especially in recent decades.

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Gandhi in the Gallery: Mini-seminar with Sumathi Ramaswamy

Nov 15, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Lemke Room, Bird Library

Sumathi Ramaswamy (Duke University)

Following a public lecture earlier in the week, Ramaswamy conducts a mini-seminar in the Special Collections Research Center of Bird Library. Syracuse University is uniquely positioned for this seminar as the SCRC houses the acclaimed Margaret Bourke-White archives, which include Bourke-White’s famous photographs of Gandhi for Life magazine as well as her India journals.

RSVP to Emera Bridger by November 8. Include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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Transgender Day of Remembrance: Alok Vaid-Menon

Nov 18, 2019, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM

T.B.D.

Alok Vaid-Menon

ALOK, a gender non-conforming writer and performance artist, presents a talk with Q&A, in recognition of Transgender Day of Remembrance. Their eclectic style and poetic challenge to the gender binary have been internationally renowned. In 2017 they received the Live Works Performance Act Award granted to ten performance artists across the world and released their inaugural poetry chapbook FEMME IN PUBLIC. They have been featured on HBO, MTV, The Guardian, BBC, CNN, and the New York Times and have presented their work at 500 venues in more than 40 countries.

Additional supporters:

  • School of Education
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Women's & Gender Studies
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

What You Have Heard Is True: A Reading by Carolyn Forché

Dec 5, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street, Syracuse

Acclaimed poet Carolyn Forché reads from her works of poetry and non-fiction.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Against Silence: The Vital Work of Telling

Dec 6, 2019, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Carolyn Forché leads a breakfast discussion on poetry and witness. RSVP to Phil Memmer by Nov. 8. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Black Subjects in Modern Photography

Jan 30, 2020, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

exact time and location T.B.A.

Black Subjects in Modern Photography features twentieth-century photographs from the George Rinhart Collection, reputedly, one of the nation’s largest private photography collections. This gallery talk with reception explores the role of visual art in constructing and thwarting Black subjectivity in the Jim Crow era. 

Additional supporters:

  • SUART Galleries
  • African American Studies Department 
  • Newhouse  
  • Community Folk Art Center (CFAC)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Perfect Victim: Why American Culture Prefers Dead (White) Girls

Feb 18, 2020, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Alice Bolin (Author)

Pop culture writer, Bolin, talks about her book, Dead Girls: Surviving an American Obsession.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Concert by The American Spiritual Ensemble

Mar 8, 2020, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Dr. Everett McCorvey (Director)

Performance featuring African-American spirituals, opera arias, and musical theatre selections. Reception to follow.

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Mar 9, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency will be broken into two separate one-week visits.

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 1" [March 9-13] includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception at the Goldstein Alumni & Visitors Center

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing:Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry and Interpretive Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Both Sides Book Circle

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 2" [April 6-10] includes:

Monday, April 6 - Toward Transformative Justice in Education (panel with an interdisciplinary research collective consisting of Cati de los Rios, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday, April 7 and 8 - Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Transformative Justice Research Roundtable

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom Book Circle

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mother Music: The African-American Spiritual & Its Role in Shaping American Musical Styles

Mar 10, 2020, 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Everett McCorvey (Director)

Lecture and recital conducted by McCorvey and the American Spiritual Ensemble.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lift Every Voice and Sing!

Mar 11, 2020, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Setnor Auditorium, Crouse College

Setnor School of Music choral ensembles join The American Spiritual Ensemble in concert.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TRACE: Silence, Cultures, and Landscapes

Mar 26, 2020, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Lauret Savoy (Mount Holyoke)

Syracuse Symposium celebrates Syracuse University's Sesquecentennial week with a return by almnus Lauret Savoy (Ph.D. '91), a renowned writer of both Native American and African American descent.  Savoy studies landscapes, the naming of landscapes, and the relation between culture and lands. Her recent book, TRACE, won the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation and the ASLE Creative Writing Award. Savoy incorporates readings with her award-winning photography.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Silence, Drawing, Social Justice, and Universal Design

Mar 30, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Bradford Grant (Howard University)

Silent contemplation can be a powerful tool for social justice. Dr. Grant’s research and teaching connect personal insights gained through meditative drawing with political action in creating spaces premised on universal design. His talk reflects on the meaning of seeing and its practical and political manifestations in design.

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Creating Just Futures: Education, Arts and Activism

Apr 6, 2020, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Maisha T. Winn (UC Davis)

Professor Winn's mini-residency will be broken into two separate one-week visits.

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 1" [March 9-13] includes:

Monday, March 9 - Welcome Reception at the Goldstein Alumni & Visitors Center

Tuesday, March 10 - Agitating, Educating, Organizing:Historicizing Transformative Justice in Education (public talk)

Wednesday, March 11 - Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry and Interpretive Methods (an RSVP workshop)

Thursday, March 12 - Justice on Boath Sides Book Circle

 

Tentative schedule for "Week 2" [April 6-10] includes:

Monday, April 6 - Toward Transformative Justice in Education (panel with an interdisciplinary research collective consisting of Cati de los Rios, UC Davis; Erika Bullock, UW Madison; Rita Kohli, UC Riverside)

Tuesday, Wednesday, April 7 and 8 - Restorative Justice Community Circles (break-out sessions with Vanessa Segundo and Adam Musser, Winn's team members from the Transformative Justice Center)

Wednesday, April 8 - Transformative Justice Research Roundtable

Thursday, April 9 - Restorative Justice in the English Language Arts Classroom Book Circle

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5th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 21, 2020, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date for this growing annual gathering of Syracuse University authors and editors celebrating humanities-related books released in 2019!  Check back as event details develop.

Meanwhile, if you or a fellow Syracuse University faculty/staff member or student published a book, copyright 2019, that contributes to the humanities broadly conceived, please tell us about it in the Books in the Humanities Survey on the FORMS page of our website. Survey closes December 13, 2019.

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