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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Poetry and Belonging: Readings by Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz

Sep 26, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

a photo related to the eventAcclaimed poets Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz have dealt with the idea of Belonging in interesting ways: Harrington through her unique explorations of the nursing home community, and the life of African American artist Horace H. Pippin; de la Paz through the themes of immigration and national/ethnic identity. Their reading will be followed by audience Q&A.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Working Between Worlds: Conversation with Janice Harrington and Oliver de la Paz

Sep 27, 2017, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Janice Harrington
Oliver de la Paz
Following public readings the night prior, poets Harrington and de la Paz meet with interested writers and readers in a small group setting. Please RSVP by September 20 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Belonging to the International: Gender, Sexuality, and Communist Identity During the Spanish Civil War

Sep 28, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum (West Chester University, PA)
As an official "Syracuse Symposium" course, the combination of RUS/LIT 400 (Revolution and the Avant-garde in Russia) with SPA 400 (Revolution: Cultural Responses in Spain) welcomes Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum, Professor of Russian History to present this public lecture, open to all.

Dr. Kirschenbaum’s talk will focus on communism as a way of life during the Spanish Civil War. She will explore how communist commitments shaped cultural and political identities as citizens sought to implement Soviet ideologies about class and gender. The incorporation of Communist iconography into Spanish daily life is read as transnational political solidarity during a time of national upheaval.

Kirschenbaum is the author of International Communism and the Spanish Civil War: Solidarity and Suspicion (Cambridge UP, 2015). This study won the Best Book by a Woman in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies awarded by The Association for Women in Slavic Studies.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Through Film We Fight On!

Sep 28, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

screenings in various locations

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

Themes of “Belonging” weave throughout the program selections in this 15th anniversary year, September 28-30. Screenings are free and open to the public.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for the complete schedule and additional details.

There will also be a workshop opportunity on Friday:

Lunch Seminar with Festival Filmmakers
September 29,
11:30 - 1 p.m.
I3 Center, Room 432-434, Newhouse 3
Presenters: Jeremy Levine, Landon van Soest, Cecilia Aldarondo
RSVP by September 22 to Kristen Northrop (315) 443-7358; include any requests for accessibility accommodations

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

For Ahkeem

Sep 28, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival: Opening Night Film and Reception

FOR AHKEEM
Jeremy Levine and Landon van Soest (USA, 2017, 89 min, closed-captioned in English)

Beginning one year before the fatal police shooting of a Black teenager in nearby Ferguson, Missouri, For Ahkeem is the coming-of-age story of Daje Shelton, a Black 17-year-old girl in North St. Louis. She fights for her future as she is placed in an alternative high school and navigates the marginalized neighborhoods, biased criminal justice policies and economic devastation that have set up many Black youth like her to fail. Over two years we watch as Daje struggles to maintain focus in school, attends the funerals of friends killed around her, falls in love with a classmate named Antonio, and navigates a loving-but-tumultuous relationship with her mother. Through Daje’s intimate coming of age story, For Ahkeem illuminates the challenges that many Black teenagers face in America today, and witnesses the strength, resilience, and determination it takes to survive. Includes introduction and Q&A with directors Jeremy Levine and Landon van Soest.

Themes of “Belonging” weave throughout the program selections in this 15th anniversary year, September 28-30. Screenings are free and open to the public.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for complete information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Memories of a Penitent Heart

Sep 29, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

MEMORIES OF A PENITENT HEART
Cecilia Aldarondo (USA, 2016, 77 min, closed-captioned in English)

Originating from filmmaker Cecilia Aldarondo’s suspicion that there was something ugly in her family’s past, this film charts her excavation of the buried family conflict around her uncle Miguel’s death, and her search for Miguel’s partner Robert a generation later. After two years of dead ends, Robert turns up: but he’s not the same man. He’s reinvented himself as Father Aquin, a Franciscan monk with twenty-five years of pent-up grief and bitterness. For the first time, a member of Miguel’s family wants to hear Aquin’s side of the story—but is it too little, too late? A story about the mistakes of the past and the second chances of the present, Memories of a Penitent Heart is a cautionary tale about the unresolved conflicts wrought by AIDS, and a nuanced exploration of how faith is used and abused in times of crisis. Includes introduction and Q&A with director Cecilia Aldarondo.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Good Postman

Sep 30, 2017, 1:00 PM-3:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

THE GOOD POSTMAN
Tonislav Hristov (Finland/Bulgaria, 2016, 82 min, Bulgarian with English subtitles)

In an almost deserted Bulgarian village on the border with Turkey, known for centuries as “The Great Gate,” there are only 38 voters left. Among the candidates running for mayor is Ivan the postman. He has come up with an unconventional and generous-minded plan to breathe new life into his village. Since the times of the Roman and Ottoman Empires, refugees have been entering Europe through this “gate.” So why not offer the passing Syrian refugees a home and a new beginning in the empty village? In this tragicomic portrait of a sleepy village that suddenly finds itself at the center of current affairs, we see how the villagers’ fears and worries compete with their hope and compassion. Includes discussion with Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Plastic China

Sep 30, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

PLASTIC CHINA
Jiu-liang Wang (Hong Kong/China, 2016, 82 min, Mandarin with English subtitles)

Director Jiu-liang Wang captures the striking, melancholic beauty of a vast and lifeless artificial landscape — a Chinese countryside covered almost entirely in imported plastic. Men and women build lives upon this waste, and children learn about the outside world through tattered western advertisements and tabloid images. Yet even within such a profoundly isolating and toxic atmosphere, hope and humanity find their way into the defiantly optimistic 11-year-old Yi-Jie. When she’s not building forts beneath massive plastic mounds, or constructing fake computers from magazine cutouts, Yi-Jie dreams of eating real fruits and raising healthy animals, as well as attending school and befriending kids her own age. She finds a kindred spirit in the young and optimistic Kun, the local recycling facility owner, who dreams, like she does, of one day escaping the plastic countryside and finding a better life. (Sundance Film Festival) 

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lipstick Under My Burkha

Sep 30, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

15th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival

LIPSTICK UNDER MY BURKHA
Alankrita Shrivastava (India, 2016, 116 min, Hindi with English subtitles)

Set in the crowded lanes of small town India, this film chronicles the secret lives of four women in search of freedom. A burkha-clad college girl struggles with issues of cultural identity and her aspirations to be a pop singer. A young, two-timing beautician seeks to escape the claustrophobia of her small town. An oppressed housewife and mother of three, lives the alternate life of an enterprising saleswoman. And a 55-year-old widow rediscovers her sexuality through a telephone romance. Challenging the prerogatives of the male gaze in popular Indian cinema, Alankrita Shrivastava’s exuberant feminist comedy drama has garnered critical acclaim and awards but also faced a high-profile struggle with the Indian film censorship board over its domestic release.

Visit the official SUHRFF website for more information.

FILMS WILL BE SCREENED with English closed captions or with English subtitles, as noted. Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) will be available at all screenings. If you require other accommodations, please contact Kristen Northrop (315-443-7358) by September 15, 2017.


Festival Presenters:
The Humanities Center
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Festival Sponsors:
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
School of Education
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
South Asia Center
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Program
International Relations Program
Latino-Latin American Studies Program
Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC)
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Festival Supporters:
Disability Cultural Center
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Anthropology
Department of Art & Music Histories
Department of Geography
Department of History
Department of Political Science
Department of Religion
Department of Sociology
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies Program

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

An Evening of Spanish Poetry: Aguado and Vilas

Oct 2, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

446 Reilly Hall, Le Moyne College

All are invited to enjoy an evening with award-winning Spanish poets Jesús Aguado and Manuel Vilas as they read from and discuss their work.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "LLC13 Alguien al Otro Lado (SU)."

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Teach-in on Charlottesville

Oct 3, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

a photo related to the event

Panelists:
Zachary Braiterman (Religion)
Kathleen Feyh (Communication & Rhetorical Studies)
Biko Gray (Religion)
Margaret Thompson (History / Political Science)
Meina Yates-Richard (English)

Moderator:
Amy Lutz (Sociology)

Recent violent demonstrations by extremists in Charlottesville, VA have renewed contentious attitudes about race in this country.  A panel of faculty come together for this Teach-In opportunity to listen, learn, and jump-start important dialogue and action plans within our own coursework and communities.  All are welcome.


Additional supporters:
African American Studies
Cultural Foundations of Education
History
Jewish Studies Program
Sociology
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Deadness: The Social Practices of Sound Reproduction

Oct 4, 2017, 2:00 PM-5:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Benjamin D. Piekut (Cornell University)

Dr. Piekut leads a mini-seminar devoted to two works: his award-winning article “Deadness: Technologies of the Intermundane” (co-authored with Jason Stanyek) and a manuscript version of a second article on “deadness.” To request a copy of the readings and to RSVP for dinner following the event, please e-mail Sarah Fuchs Sampson by 9/27/17.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group LLC10 "Sound & Media."

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Embodied Belongings: Exploring the Politics of ‘Queer’ in South Asia

Oct 5, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

a photo related to the event

Vivek Shraya (Toronto)
Multidisciplinary South Asian artist Vivek Shraya will show and discuss a range of media -- literature, song and film -- to highlight the complex relationship between belonging and the body itself.  Her work consistently tackles what it means to belong (and not belong) in relation to family, religion, community spaces, queerness and transness.

Shraya appears as part of the South Asia Center's Fall Symposium -- in collaboration with the Ray Smith Symposium.

Friday, October 6
6:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages
This session features a reading by widely published, award-winning author, Shyam Selvadurai. His novel Funny Boy draws on his experience of being gay in the violent 1980s of Sri Lanka.  


Additional supporters:
South Asia Center
Ray Smith Symposium
Anthropology
Religion
Women’s and Gender Studies
English
LGBTQ Program
Ford Maxwell Professor South Asian Studies

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[CANCELLED] All the Agents and Saints

Oct 9, 2017, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Bird Library

Stephanie Elizondo Griest (UNC-Chapel Hill)

Unfortunately, this public lecture has been cancelled, with no immediate plans to reschedule.

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Public Humanities Fellows Showcase

Oct 12, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

CUNY Graduate Center, Skylight Room, 365 Fifth Avenue, NYC

a photo related to the eventMax Hayward, former Fellow at Columbia University
Cara Shousterman, former Fellow at New York University
Thomas Guiler, former Fellow at Syracuse University
Tonya Lewis, former Fellow at the University at Buffalo
Sarah Litvin, former Fellow at the CUNY Graduate Center
Francisco Delgado, former Fellow at Stony Brook University

Humanities New York and the humanities centers of its nine partner universities (see below) welcome all to the Public Humanities Fellows Showcase, featuring six young scholars presenting work on the cutting edge of the growing field of the public humanities. Registration requested.

Graduate Student Public Humanities Fellowships are a project of Humanities New York, in partnership with:
  • Binghamton University’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities
  • The City University of New York Graduate Center’s The Center for the Humanities
  • Columbia University’s Heyman Center for the Humanities
  • Cornell University’s Society for the Humanities
  • New York University’s The Center for the Humanities
  • State University of New York at Buffalo’s Humanities Institute
  • State University of New York at Binghamton’s Humanities Institute
  • Syracuse University’s Humanities Center / CNY Humanities Corridor
  • The University of Rochester’s Humanities Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Performing Change: Diaspora and Belonging

Oct 12, 2017, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

a photo related to the eventWafaa Bilal (New York University, Tisch School)
An internationally acclaimed artist, Bilal's interactive installations and creative performances encourage dialogue about questions of identity, exile, and American politics. Born in Iraq, Bilal’s 2007 installation Domestic Tension highlighted the corporeal impact of the US invasion of Iraq on Arab and Muslim Americans, raising questions about belonging that remain pertinent to today’s politics of exclusion.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Wafaa Bilal: On Art and Resistance

Oct 13, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Wafaa Bilal (New York University Tisch School)
As an Iraqi-born American, Bilal's artistic engagement with media, video, and design challenges the dominant steretoypes of the Middle East as a space dominated by war, or religion, and void of culture.  His works gives visibility to the region’s vast tradition of cultural production often under-represented, including on college campuses. The morning following his public talk, Bilal’s small-group session continues an important conversation on the relevance and role of artistic expression and the humanities in general in addressing issues of war trauma, violence, and diasporic belongings. 

Please RSVP to Amy Kallander by Otober 4; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Foucault, Power, and Government

Oct 16, 2017, 4:30 PM-7:00 PM

Guerlac Room, A.D.E. White House, Society for the Humanities, Cornell University

Paul Patton (University of New South Wales)
Scientia Professor Paul Patton presents a public lecture co-sponsored by PH8 -- Society for the Study of Biopolitical Futures. For more information, please contact Gregg Lambert.
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Into the Mystic: A Night of Turkish Sufi Music and Poetry with Latif Bolat

Oct 17, 2017, 7:15 PM-9:30 PM

308 Setnor (lecture), Setnor Auditorium (performance)

a photo related to the event

7:15-7:45 p.m. - Lecture in Setnor Room 308

8-9:30 p.m. - Performance in Setnor Auditorium

Musician and scholar Latif Bolat presents an evening of Turkish Sufi songs and devotional poetry by Jalal ad-Din Rumi and Yunus Emre. Bolat has performed in more than a dozen countries, recorded four albums, and composed music for television programs. He is the co-editor of Quarreling with God: Mystic Rebel Poems of the Dervishes of Turkey (White Cloud Press, 2007).

Additional supporters:
South Asian Studies
Performance Live course
Art & Music Histories
Religion

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Syracuse International Film Festival: 'The Road To Where'

Oct 18, 2017, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

121 Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

This year's Syracuse International Film Festival kicks off with a screening of The Road To Where, a new feature film by Michal Bat-Adam -- Israel’s first woman feature filmmaker -- and a new documentary about her by Netalie Braun.

Michal’s film deals with the human interactions of a group of people who live in an apartment building in Jerusalem that used to be occupied by Arab families. The accompanying documentary shows her struggle to make films and be accepted as an artist in her own right, especially as she is married to Moshe Mizrahi, Israel’s most recognized filmmaker and Academy Award winner.

The 14th annual Syracuse International Film Festival starts Wednesday, October 18th and runs through Sunday, October 22nd.  Students will be admitted free with Syracuse University ID.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Decolonizing Digital Networks: Women of Color Feminism, Open Access, and What it Means to be Woke

Oct 19, 2017, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Gamble Room, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester

Lisa Nakamura (University of Michigan)
This public lunch talk is part of the Digital Humanities Speaker Series and the Global DH's "Digitizing Decolonization" theme that seeks to make space for broader perspectives in Digital Humanities, and to bring otherwise marginalized voices to the fore. To request any accessibility accommodations, please contact Jennie Gilardoni.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "DH3 Global Digital Humanities."

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Bringing Theater into Life: Pirandello’s 'Tonight We Improvise,' From Short Story to Theatrical Vision

Oct 19, 2017, 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

311A Huntington Beard Crouse

Pietro Frassica (Princeton)
To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Luigi Pirandello’s birth, Professor Frassica, a leader in Pirandello studies in North America and Europe, investigates the playwright’s strategies in Tonight We Improvise which challenge the thresholds between art and life -- questions still relevant today since the work's 1930 opening in Königsberg, Germany. Tonight We Improvise will appeal to those interested in Modernism, Expressionism, European studies, theater and literature.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art and Architecture of That Day Now

Oct 24, 2017, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Slocum Hall Atrium and Marble Room

a photo related to the event

Keiko Ogura (Japan)
Edward Morris, Moderator (The Canary Lab)
Yutaka Sho (Syracuse University)
Linda Zhang (Syracuse University)

Artists and architects who archive, represent, question and disseminate memories of past events will join Hiroshima atomic bomb survivor Keiko Ogura in this panel discussion. Opening reception for the interactive exhibition That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima follows, in the Marble Room at Slocum. 

Related activities:

August 23 - November 26
Exibition: That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

October 19 - November 3
Installation: "That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Slocum Hall Marble Room

October 22
Video Projection: "After Hiroshima Mon Amor" and "Let Me Count the Ways"
Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

October 24
AM: Ms. Ogura meets with local high school students
Everson Museum of Art

5:30 p.m.: "Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art & Architecture of That Day Now"
Panel discussion and reception
Slocum Hall Atrium

October 23 - 25 - 26 - 27
Ms. Ogura meets with various community groups, students, media

October 28
LLL / Moynihan Symposium: That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs in Post-WWII Japanese Culture
Slocum Hall Auditorium

October 30
Individual / small group meetings with Ms. Ogura, available by appointment; email for information.

November 16
Closing reception for That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

Visit the School of Architecture website for additional details.

"That Day Now" series made possible by:

  • The Japan Foundation
  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
  • Hiroshima Fukuyama Technical High School
  • Hiroshima Motomachi High School
  • Everson Museum of Art
  • Clear Path for Veterans
  • Syracuse City School District
  • Syracuse University units/programs, including: the School of Architecture; The Canary Lab at the College of Visual and Performing Arts; the East Asia Program at Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs; Syracuse University Galleries; the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs; Office of Veteran and Military Affairs; the School of Education; the Humanities Center; Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at Arts and Sciences; Syracuse University Study Abroad; the Center for Human Policy; the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications; and the Syracuse University libraries.

BIOGRAPHY: On August 6, 1945, at age 8, Keiko was exposed to the atomic bomb 2.4km away from the hypocenter. She graduated from Hiroshima Jogakuin University in 1959. In 1962, she married Mr. Kaoru Ogura,  director of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and Secretary General of Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. His work engaged in the promotion of A-bomb exhibitions outside Japan. Following her husband's death in 1979, Ogura began working for Hiroshima herself and deepened international exchanges with writers and journalists, becoming an interpreting coordinator for peace-movement visitors from abroad. In 1984, she established Hiroshima Interpreters for Peace and published Hiroshima Handbook, Hiroshima Peace Park Guide, Hip's Hiroshima Guide and One Day in Hiroshima. She was delegated as the official teller of Hiroshima A-bomb experience in English by Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation in 2011.

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Translingual Dispositions: A Teaching Workshop

Oct 25, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

a photo related to the event

Jerry Won Lee (University of California, Irvine)

In this mini-seminar setting, Lee challenges a narrowly conceptualized view of Englishes by sharing current theories of translingualism through cutting-edge scholarship from sociolinguistics, critical theory, and composition studies. Please RSVP to Kristen Krouse by October 18 and include any requests for accessibility accomodations.

Additional supporters:
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
School of Education
Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics


BIOGRAPHY: Jerry Won Lee is an Assistant Professor in the departments of English, Anthropology, East Asian Languages & Literatures, and Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. As an interdisciplinary scholar, the overarching goal of his research has been the examination of the cultural politics of globalization, with a particular focus on questions of “language” and “nation,” oftentimes seeking to understand their interrelationships.  In terms of “language,” Dr. Lee focuses on the politics of multilingualism and “global” Englishes from both theoretical-sociolinguistic and pedagogical angles. In terms of “nation,” he has focused on the official and vernacular functions and forms of ethnic identity in the context of and in spaces beyond the rubric of the nation-state. Dr. Lee has published on these topics in a range of journals, including Verge: Studies in Global AsiasInternational Journal of Applied LinguisticsCollege Composition and CommunicationCollege EnglishNational Identities, and Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.

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The Politics of Transligualism: After Englishes

Oct 25, 2017, 2:15 PM-3:40 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Jerry Won Lee (University of California, Irvine)

Dr. Jerry Won Lee’s scholarship contributes to the ongoing and much needed discussion concerning translingualism, which refers to an orientation in scholarship that recognizes the fluidity of language boundaries and endorses a greater tolerance for the plurality of Englishes worldwide. His new book destabilizes underlying attitudes inherent in narrowly conceptualized view of Englishes by pushing forward current theories of translingualism and integrating cutting-edge scholarship from sociolinguistics, critical theory, and composition studies.

Additional supporters:
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
School of Education
Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics


BIOGRAPHY: Jerry Won Lee is an Assistant Professor in the departments of English, Anthropology, East Asian Languages & Literatures, and Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. As an interdisciplinary scholar, the overarching goal of his research has been the examination of the cultural politics of globalization, with a particular focus on questions of “language” and “nation,” oftentimes seeking to understand their interrelationships.  In terms of “language,” Dr. Lee focuses on the politics of multilingualism and “global” Englishes from both theoretical-sociolinguistic and pedagogical angles. In terms of “nation,” he has focused on the official and vernacular functions and forms of ethnic identity in the context of and in spaces beyond the rubric of the nation-state. Dr. Lee has published on these topics in a range of journals, including Verge: Studies in Global AsiasInternational Journal of Applied LinguisticsCollege Composition and CommunicationCollege EnglishNational Identities, and Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Where is the Center of the World? On Literature and Mapping

Oct 26, 2017, 2:30 PM-4:40 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Bertrand Westphal (University of Limoges)

Westphal, a humanist of international acclaim, delivers this public lecture and a three-hour mini-seminar (October 27) to interested students, faculty and staff. Westphal is known for his work on Geocriticism and spatiality. This approach to literature and culture considers all types of geographical and imaginary peripheries, borders, and maps. Geocriticism is an innovative theoretical approach to literature that takes geographical spaces into account.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "LLC 11 Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery." 

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Mapping the Heavens: How Radical Ideas Have Transformed Our Cosmic View

Oct 26, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities - 2017

Priyamvada Natarajan (Yale)

From time immemorial humans have been charting the night sky and trying to make sense of it and contemplating their place in the cosmos.  Dr. Natarajan recounts the evolution of celestial map-making and shows how maps literally track our ever evolving cosmic view. Tracing our understanding of the universe, its contents and its evolution, this Wali lecture will focus on recent developments in our understanding of two invisible entities: dark matter and black holes.

About the presenter:
Dr. Priyamvada Natarajan, Ph.D. holds the Sophie and Tycho Brahe Professorship at the Dark Cosmology Center at the University of Copenhagen, and an Honorary Professorship for life at the University of Delhi

Kameshwar C. Wali is Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus the Department of Physics. Wali is internationally recognized for his scholarship in the symmetry properties of fundamental particles and their interactions, and for his work on the physics of music. He has held positions at Harvard, The University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel), Institutes des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, and the International Center for Theoretical Physics.

The Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities was established by Wali’s daughters, Alaka, Achala, and Monona, as an expression of their admiration and gratitude for his vision, leadership, and dedication to Syracuse University and the community.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Geocriticism

Oct 27, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Bertrand Westphal (University of Limoges)

Westphal, a humanist of international acclaim known for his work on Geocriticism and spatiality leads a small-group mini-seminar delving into an approach to literature and culture which considers all types of geographical and imaginary peripheries, borders, and maps. Please RSVP to Kathy Everly by October 15 and include any requests for accessibility accomodations.

This event is organized by the CNY Humanities Corridor working group "LLC 11 Perspectives on Europe from the Periphery." 

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs on Post-WWII Japanese Culture

Oct 28, 2017, 9:00 AM-6:00 PM

Slocum Hall Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Keiko Ogura (Japan)
Dr. Daisaku Yamamoto (Colgate University)
Rahna Reiko Rizzuto (author)
Dr. Chad Diehl (Loyola University)
Dr. Sue Napier (Tufts University)

On That Day in 1945, the first atomic bomb attacked Hiroshima, and three days later Nagasaki, and changed the world ever after. This interdisciplinary symposium will hear from Hiroshima survivor Keiko Ogura and scholars whose research reveal the bombs’ lasting effects on our daily lives. The panel includes guests from Syracuse University and beyond, hosted by the Languages, Literatures and Linguistics department and the Moynihan Institute.

Related activities:

August 23 - November 26
Exibition: That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

October 19 - November 3
Installation: "That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Slocum Hall Marble Room

October 22
Video Projection: "After Hiroshima Mon Amor" and "Let Me Count the Ways"
Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

October 24
AM: Ms. Ogura meets with local high school students
Everson Museum of Art

5:30 p.m.: "Warped by Time, Shaped by History: The Art & Architecture of That Day Now"
Panel discussion and reception
Slocum Hall Atrium

October 23 - 25 - 26 - 27
Ms. Ogura meets with various community groups, students, media

October 28
LLL / Moynihan Symposium: That Day in 1945: Effects of the Atomic Bombs in Post-WWII Japanese Culture
Slocum Hall Auditorium

October 30
Individual / small group meetings with Ms. Ogura, available by appointment; email for information.

November 16
Closing reception for That Day Now: Shadows Cast by Hiroshima
Everson Museum of Art

Visit the School of Architecture website for additional details.

"That Day Now" series made possible by:

  • The Japan Foundation
  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
  • Hiroshima Fukuyama Technical High School
  • Hiroshima Motomachi High School
  • Everson Museum of Art
  • Clear Path for Veterans
  • Syracuse City School District
  • Syracuse University units/programs, including: the School of Architecture; The Canary Lab at the College of Visual and Performing Arts; the East Asia Program at Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs; Syracuse University Galleries; the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs; Office of Veteran and Military Affairs; the School of Education; the Humanities Center; Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at Arts and Sciences; Syracuse University Study Abroad; the Center for Human Policy; the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications; and the Syracuse University libraries.

BIOGRAPHY: On August 6, 1945, at age 8, Keiko was exposed to the atomic bomb 2.4km away from the hypocenter. She graduated from Hiroshima Jogakuin University in 1959. In 1962, she married Mr. Kaoru Ogura,  director of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and Secretary General of Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. His work engaged in the promotion of A-bomb exhibitions outside Japan. Following her husband's death in 1979, Ogura began working for Hiroshima herself and deepened international exchanges with writers and journalists, becoming an interpreting coordinator for peace-movement visitors from abroad. In 1984, she established Hiroshima Interpreters for Peace and published Hiroshima Handbook, Hiroshima Peace Park Guide, Hip's Hiroshima Guide and One Day in Hiroshima. She was delegated as the official teller of Hiroshima A-bomb experience in English by Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation in 2011. 

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Creative Conversations: Water and Photography

Nov 2, 2017, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

Jeffrey Karson (Syracuse University - Earth Sciences)
Ed Morris (Syracuse University - Transmedia)
Susannah Sayler (Syracuse University - Transmedia)

This public dialogue highlights the intersections between the humanities and the sciences at a time when these disciplines are in danger of becoming more polarized than ever. The conversational format -- versus a lecture -- is meant to tease out these overlaps. How do humanists, artists, and scientists approach similar subjects, through different disciplinary lenses?

Jeff Karson has published an award-winning atlas of photographs of the ocean floor; Susannah Sayler works on art and ecology. Bringing Jeff and Susannah together in a conversation moderated by Ed Morris, opens up new ways of talking about water, landscape, time, technology, photography, and climate change, across the Humanities and Sciences. Q&A and reception follows the program.


Additional supporters:
Art and Music Histories
Transmedia
Earth Sciences
Light Work
Science Teaching
SUArt Galleries
Geography

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Where Have All the Alphabets Gone? Disappearing Traditional Writing Systems and the Worldwide Loss of Cultural Identity

Nov 3, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Tim Brookes (Champlain College)

Tim Brookes, founder of the Endangered Alphabets Project, uses art to draw attention to imperiled languages and cultures, creating wood carvings that display the beautiful scripts of languages on the verge of extinction.  Brookes will address questions of how a culture’s writing system reflects a sense of value, legitimacy and belonging, why cultures around the world are losing their traditional scripts, and what else is being lost in the process.

Additional Supporters:
The University Libraries
The College of Arts & Sciences
Languages, Literature & Linguistics
Religion
The Indigenous Values Initiative
The School of Education
Reading and Language Arts

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Enough with All These Border Walls: Redrawing Disciplinary Becoming and Belonging

Nov 8, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Paul Prior (University of Illinois)
Space is limited for this small-group session.  Please RSVP to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu by October 30. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making and Remaking a Literate Life: Being, Longing, Belonging

Nov 8, 2017, 2:15 PM-3:45 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Paul Prior (University of Illinois)
Jody Shipka (University of Maryland)
This presentation challenges static notions of being and belonging in accounts of literacies and disciplines. Instead, it offers a dynamic view of the embodied, affective, and historically situated processes of making and remaking literate lives.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making, Being, and Belonging Through Multimodal Composing

Nov 9, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Jody Shipka (University of Maryland)
Space is limited for this small-group session.  Please RSVP to Patrick W. Berry at pwberry@syr.edu by October 30. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Black Feminists and the Transformation of American Public Life

Nov 27, 2017, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, 140 Newhouse 3

This panel discussion brings together three acclaimed, accomplished black feminists offering personal reflections and insights on topics ranging from the power of collaboration, educational pathways and politics, to key lessons from history, both distant and recent.  A welcome reception will follow in the Hergenhan lobby. This page will be updated as details develop for this exciting Syracuse Symposium Keynote event.

Featured speakers:

Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Principal Consultant at Cook Ross, President Emerita of Spelman College and Bennett College, inaugural Director, National Museum of African Art (retired)
Selected publications:
•    All American Women: Lines That Divide, Ties That Bind (ed.). Free Press, 1986.
•    Conversations: Straight Talk with America’s Sister President. Anchor Press, 1994.
•    Dream the Boldest Dream and Other Lessons of Life. Longstreet Press, 2001.
•    Gender Talk – The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities. Co-authored with Beverly Guy-Sheftall. One World Press, 2003.
•    Who Should Be First? Feminists Speak Out on the 2008 Presidential Campaign. Co-authored with Beverly Guy-Sheftall. SUNY Press, 2010.
•    I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde. Co-edited with Rudolph P. Byrd and Beverly Guy-Sheftall. Oxford University Press, 2011.

Paula J. Giddings, E. A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita, Afro-American Studies, Smith College and journal editor, Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism
Selected publications:
•    When and Where I Enter: The Impact on Black Women on Race and Sex in America. William Morrow & Co, 1984.
•    In Search of Sisterhood: Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement. William Morrow & Co, 1988.
•    Burning All Illusions: Writings from The Nation on Race (ed). Nation Books, 2002.
•    Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. Amistad/Harper Collins, 2008.

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women’s Studies and English and Founding Director, Women’s Research and Resource Center, Spelman College
Selected publications:
•    Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature. Co-edited with Roseann P. Bell and Bettye Parker Smith. Doubleday, 1980
•    Daughters of Sorrow: Attitudes Toward Black Women, 1880-1920. Carlson, 1991.
•    Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. New Press, 1995.
•    Traps: African American Men on Gender and Sexuality. Co-edited with Rudolph Byrd. Indiana University Press, 2001.
•    Gender Talk – The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities. Co-authored with Johnnetta Betsch Cole. One World Press, 2003.
•    Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women's Studies. Co-edited with Stanlie M. James and Frances Smith Foster. Feminist Press, 2009.
•    Who Should Be First? Feminists Speak Out on the 2008 Presidential Campaign. Co-authored with Johnnetta Betsch Cole. SUNY Press, 2010.
•    I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde. Co-edited with Rudolph P. Byrd and Johnnetta Betsch Cole. Oxford University Press, 2011.


Co-Sponsors include:

  1. College of Arts & Sciences
  2. The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  3. Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  4. School of Education
  5. Office of Multicultural Affairs
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Music and Food in Multicultural Syracuse: Performing New American Traditions

Dec 2, 2017, 6:00 PM-8:30 PM

Grant Auditorium (concert); Wildhack Room (reception) in White Hall / Falk College

6-7:30 p.m. - Concert in Grant Auditorium (White Hall, Falk College)
7:30-8:30 p.m. - Reception in Wildhack Room

Francis Faida and Family (Burundi)
Immaculee Kandathe
(Congo)
Matupi Chin and Karen Dancers
(Burma)
Bhakta Ghalley and Friends (Nepal/Bhutan)
Ahmad Alkhlef and Friends (Syria)
Shwe HninSi (Chef, With Love, Burma)

All are welcome to celebrate this unique collaboration between the departments of Art & Music Histories in the College of Arts and Sciences, the Food Studies Program of Falk College, and With Love Restaurant -- the culmination of students’ work with musicians and chefs from Syracuse’s diverse refugee communities over the course of the semester. The evening begins with an eclectic concert of music and dance traditions from around the world.

Students studying the traditions of and issues faced by immigrant and refugee communities in Syracuse team up with students exploring cultural foodways and political/social histories of Burma to participate in a hands-on workshop with Burmese chef Shwe HninSi, preparing food for this event. "Music and Food in Multicultural Syracuse" serves not only as a showcase of refugees’ traditions as practiced in Syracuse but also as a folk festival in miniature to educate us all about our new American neighbors.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Consequences of Classification: Systemic Violence Against Marginalized Communities

Dec 4, 2017, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Melissa Adler (University of Kentucky)

Systems of classification exist across every field, from biological taxonomies to library shelves. These systems reflect the values of their creators and exert power in defining relationships of belonging. Using classifications as primary historical texts and conceptualizing them as systems that organize state and cultural discourses, Adler will discuss some of the processes by which the marginalization of queer and racialized subjects becomes systemic, and ways that critical analysis reveals possibilities for organizing otherwise. Interdisciplinary fields, such as critical animal studies, disability studies, queer studies, and critical race studies are deeply invested in the critique and production of taxonomies and language, and while they share similar histories of oppression, their subjects push the limits of classifications in unique and compelling ways.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Taxonomic Repair Work

Dec 5, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

Melissa Adler (University of Kentucky)

Melissa Adler follows her public lecture with a focused workshop on how classification systems -- from biological taxonomies to library organization systems -- reflect the values of their creators and exert power, especially over marginalized subjects. Please RSVP to Rachel Clark by November 28; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Theatre of the Mind: Staging Mental Health & Sense of Belonging

Jan 28, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Sutton Pavilion, Syracuse Stage

In conjunction with our production of Next to Normal -- and following a matinee performance on Sunday, January 28 -- Syracuse Stage will host a panel of mental health educators, theatre artists, psychiatric practitioners, and community members for an in-depth public discussion. 

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Care/Work: Queer Disabled Femme of Color Magic

Feb 7, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

304AB Schine Student Center

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

In this performance/reading, poet Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha reads from new and recent work focused on queer hard femme disabled poetics of color -- the intersections of working class femme smarts and survival, crip world, femme on femme of color intimacies and the rebellions and vulnerable strengths found therein.


BIOGRAPHY: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer, educator and disability and transformative justice organizer. The Lambda and ALA Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she co-founded and co-directed QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili from 2005-2015. A lead artist with disability justice performance troupe Sins Invalid, she is currently finishing her new book of essays, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Culture and book of poetry, Tonguebreaker.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Care/Work: Queer Disabled Femme of Color Magic

Feb 8, 2018, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Toronto/Oakland)

Updated info coming soon...


BIOGRAPHY: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer femme sick and disabled Sri Lankan/ Irish/Roma writer, educator and disability and transformative justice organizer. The Lambda and ALA Stonewall Award winning author of Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, Consensual Genocide and co-editor of The Revolution Starts At Home, she co-founded and co-directed QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili from 2005-2015. A lead artist with disability justice performance troupe Sins Invalid, she is currently finishing her new book of essays, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Culture and book of poetry, Tonguebreaker.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Singer-Songwriter Tracy Hamlin

Feb 26, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

Singer/songwriter Tracy Hamlin uses jazz and R&B to explore issues of race, identity and belonging. Best known for her work with Pieces of a Dream and Gloria Gaynor, Hamlin's visit to Syracuse includes a CNY Jazz sponsored performance at the historic Marriott Syracuse Downtown over the weekend and this Monday afternoon panel discussion on campus.  Addition details will be posted as they develop.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Akin: Embedding as Artistic Strategy

Mar 8, 2018, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, Hosmer Auditorium, 401 Harrison Street

Eva Marie Rødbro (Copenhagen)
Keren Shavit (Light Work)

The public is invited to this screening and reception.

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Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities in residence

Mar 19, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

complete schedule T.B.A.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.  This year's Watson Professor is Susan Schweik (University of California - Berkeley). Continue to check this site for developing details about Schweik's schedule.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Classification & Language(s) of Belonging

Apr 5, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Classification & Language(s) of Belonging

Apr 6, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Jenna Freedman (Columbia University)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Mini-seminar with Poets Sean Thomas Dougherty & Christina Kitano

Apr 13, 2018, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

The YMCA Downtown Writers Center hosts this mini-seminar prior to an evening of readings featuring acclaimed poets, Dougherty and Kitano. Both writers have published important works that address this year’s Symposium theme of "Belonging."  This session is specifically targeted at serious writers and writing teachers; invited guests include advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, creative writing MFA students from the University, and faculty members from both programs. Space is limited: please RSVP by April 6 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Readings and Q&A with Poets Sean Thomas Dougherty & Christine Kitano

Apr 13, 2018, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

The YMCA Downtown Writers Center hosts an evening of readings by acclaimed poets, Dougherty and Kitano. Both writers have published important works that address this year’s Symposium theme of "Belonging." All a

CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”
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3rd Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Save the date, and check back as details develop for the Humanities Center's annual celebration of Syracuse University authors (copyright 2017)!
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Does the Earth Belong to Us, or Do We Belong to the Earth? Buddhism and the Ecological Challenge

Apr 19, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

David Loy (Boulder, CO)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Healing Ecology: A Buddhist Perspective on the Eco-Crisis

Apr 20, 2018, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Workshop with author, professor, Zen teacher David Loy
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