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Building Knowledge in the Renaissance: Humanist Constructs and Conversations

Apr 25, 2018, 12:45 PM-2:00 PM

Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library

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Timothy Kircher (Guilford College)

This public lecture features a pop-up exhibit of selected Italian manuscripts and rare materials preserved in the Ranke Collection at SU Special Collections Research Center. (Display open until 3 p.m.)

Professor Kircher's talk examines how fifteenth- and sixteenth-century humanists explored various pathways to knowledge. To what extent did Renaissance thinkers establish new methods of learning in the studia humanitatis? Kircher sheds light on the current debate over the relation between the humanities and the sciences, in addition to revealing new features of Renaissance civilization (Kultur) since its formulation by Jacob Burckhardt, the foremost student of Leopold von Ranke.


BIOGRAPHY: Tim Kircher is Professor of History at Guilford College. In a number of books and articles, he investigates the work of Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Leon Battista Alberti in relation to that of their contemporaries, and has been past President of the American Boccaccio Association. He is currently writing a book on humanist philosophical thought entitled Before Enlightenment: Play and Illusion in Renaissance Humanism. He also explores the relation of the humanities disciplines to the sciences and other fields through a website at humanitieswatch.org. His article on humanist letter-writing will appear the fall issue of Renaissance Quarterly.

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Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau

Apr 25, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

105 Life Science Building

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions combines short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

This final gathering in the series features Colleen Kattau on Latin American music and activism. All are welcome.

Additional supporters:

  1.     Art and Music Histories
  2.     Latino and Latin American Studies
  3.     Women’s and Gender Studies
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The Joy of Close Reading in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Apr 27, 2018, 9:00 AM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

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A Conference in Memory of Hope Glidden

Keynote speaker Phillip Usher (NYU) begins the conference with "The Life of an Ode," followed by a day of dialogues across departments, as faculty present papers on the practice of close reading of historical sources and literary texts in the context of their research. This event is organized in memory of Professor Hope Glidden who taught early modern French literature at Syracuse University and passed away on Sept. 17, 2017.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM (download the poster):

9:00 Breakfast

9:20 Opening Remarks

9:30 Keynote Lecture by Philip Usher (New York University): The Life of an Ode

10:30 Coffee Break

10:45-12:15 First Panel: Reading Disappointment

  • James Watts (Religion): The Disappointments of Close Reading, with an Example from Leviticus 12
  • Jeff Carnes (LLL, Classics): Narcissus in Ovid's Metamorphoses
  • Ahmed Meguid (Religion): The Paradox of Reading Islamic Philosophy: The Discontents of Philology

1:00-2:30 Second Panel: Reading Performance

  • Amanda Winkler (Art & Music History): Singing Devils; or, the Trouble with Trapdoors: History, Performance, and Practicality in Staging the Restoration Tempest
  • Stephanie Shirilan (English and Textual Studies): Sympathetic Breathing in King Lear
  • Laurinda Dixon (Art & Music History): The Mechanics of Mirth: A Close look at laughter in the Renaissance

2:30-2:45 Coffee Break

2:45-4:15 Third Panel: Reading Power 

  • Dennis Romano (History): Popular Protest and Alternative Visions of the Venetian Polity, c.1260 to 1423
  • Fred Marquardt (History): How was Christ’s Crucifixion Relevant to Serfdom in the German Peasants’ War of 1525?
  • Brian Brege (History): Spiced Scholarship: Filippo Sassetti and the Quest for True Cinnamon

4:15- 4:30 Coffee Break

4:30-5:30 Fourth Panel: Reading the Other World

  • Samantha Herrick (History): Mystery Saints
  • Stefano Selenu (LLL, Italian): Dante's Hell and the Mediterranean
  • 5:30-5:45 Closing Remarks, reception follows

Please contact Albrecht Diem (315-443-0785) by April 15 with any requests for accessibility accommodations.


OTHER CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES:

April 13
9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m - 21st Annual French Colloquium, honoring Hope Glidden's memory
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons; Bird Library, Room 114
Keynote address and special tribute to Hope Glidden at 1:30 p.m. by Benjamin Peak, PhD student in French at John Hopkins University.
Download the schedule here or contact Valentin Duquet for information.

April 25
12:45 - 2 p.m. - Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library
Timothy Kircher (Guilford College)
Building Knowledge in the Renaissance: Humanist Constructs and Conversations
Contact Stefano Selenu for information.


Additional Supporters:

  1. Medieval and Renaissance Program
  2. Humanities Center
  3. College of Arts and Science
  4. Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics
  5. Department of History
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Humanities NY Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Presentations

May 4, 2018, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Hugh Burnam (Ph.D. Candidate, Higher Education)
Matthew Stewart (Ph.D. Candidate, History)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss their experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects.

  • Matthew Stewart: Imagination and Place: Building Community with Onondaga Earth Corps
  • Hugh Burnam: A Haudenosaunee Thought Project: Navigating Difficult Conversations and Understanding Indigenous Self-Worth

To RSVP, please contact Aimee Germain by April 25; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Mindfulness Interventions to Reduce Stress and Foster Resilience in Children across Diverse Communities

May 4, 2018, 1:00 PM-2:30 PM

335 White Hall

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Andres Gonzales (Holistic Life Foundation)

Contemplative Collaborative invites Gonzales to talk about his organization’s work in utilizing school-based mindfulness interventions with children. His presentation focuses on the implementation of a mindfulness program shown to be effective in cultivating spaces for wellness and healing with urban youth served by Baltimore city schools. 


BIOGRAPHY: Gonzalez has been the Co-Founder and Marketing Director for the Holistic Life Foundation, Inc. in Baltimore, MD since 2001.  For sixteen years, Andres has taught yoga to diverse populations throughout the world, including Baltimore City Public School students, drug treatment centers, mental crisis facilities, homeless shelters, wellness centers, colleges, private schools and other various venues throughout the nation and throughout the world. He has partnered with John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health and the Penn State’s Prevention Research Center on a Stress and Relaxation Study and is a published author in the Journal of Children’s Services. His work with the Holistic Life Foundation has been featured on Making a Difference on the NBC Nightly News, CNN, and CBS, as well as O the Oprah Magazine, The Washington Post, Upworthy, Mindful MagazineYoga JournalShambala Sun, and many other publications.  He maintains a B.S. in Marketing from University of Maryland, College Park and an MBA from the University of Maryland, University College.


Additional supporters:

  • Contemplative Collaborative
  • Falk College
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Hendricks Chapel
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Voces en Exilio

Sep 20, 2018, 12:00 AM-11:00 PM

LaCasita Cultural Center (109 Otisco Street, Syracuse) - TIME T.B.A.

Many have been moved by the number of Puerto Ricans -- including those with Syracuse connections -- whose lives were disrupted by Hurricane María (September, 2017). Although hope abounds that life-as-usual will someday be restored there, many displaced families have no immediate plans to return to Puerto Rico. This story resonates deeply with José “Peppie” Calvar, Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Choral Activities at the Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University, and director of the Hendricks Chapel Choir.

Peppie is a first-generation American of Cuban descent, whose family, under a different set of circumstances, was exiled from its homeland. This project proposes to create a piece of music for mixed chorus, Afro-Caribbean percussion, and possible piano to commemorate hurricane victims. The music and text would touch on the suffering of the Puerto Rican people and the need to restore critical infrastructure to the island, but it would become a celebration of the outpouring of support many displaced Puerto Ricans have received from fellow Americans living on the mainland.
 
The all-student Hendricks Chapel Choir will participate in the production process for this original piece, arranging two public performances as part of their Fall '18 curriculum -- at La Casita, September 20th and in Hendricks Chapel, September 23rd

Please save the dates and check back for details as they develop. 

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Voces en Exilio

Sep 23, 2018, 12:00 AM-11:00 PM

Hendricks Chapel - TIME T.B.A.

Many have been moved by the number of Puerto Ricans -- including those with Syracuse connections -- whose lives were disrupted by Hurricane María (September, 2017). Although hope abounds that life-as-usual will someday be restored there, many displaced families have no immediate plans to return to Puerto Rico. This story resonates deeply with José “Peppie” Calvar, Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Choral Activities at the Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University, and director of the Hendricks Chapel Choir.

Peppie is a first-generation American of Cuban descent, whose family, under a different set of circumstances, was exiled from its homeland. This project proposes to create a piece of music for mixed chorus, Afro-Caribbean percussion, and possible piano to commemorate hurricane victims. The music and text would touch on the suffering of the Puerto Rican people and the need to restore critical infrastructure to the island, but it would become a celebration of the outpouring of support many displaced Puerto Ricans have received from fellow Americans living on the mainland.
 
The all-student Hendricks Chapel Choir will participate in the production process for this original piece, arranging two public performances as part of their Fall '18 curriculum -- at La Casita, September 20th and in Hendricks Chapel, September 23rd

Please save the dates and check back for details as they develop. 

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