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Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows Presentations

Jan 18, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

a photo related to the event

Lorenza D’Angelo (Ph.D. Candidate, Philosophy)
Adam Kozaczka (Ph.D. Candidate, English)

Enjoy coffee and light breakfast as you hear more about the research of the Humanities Center's 2018-2019 Dissertation Fellows, D'Angeloa and Kozaczka. Contact The Humanities Center for additional information, or to request any accessibility accommodations.

View or download the event flier.


The Pleasures of Art, by Lorenza D’Angelo
Works of art are rich sources of pleasure. But, what sorts of pleasure do they afford? Conscious sensory perception is a paradigmatic and relatively well-understood type of conscious experience. Thus, a common theoretical approach in philosophy of mind seeks to reduce all conscious experience to the senses, including all experience of pleasure. I argue that this approach to consciousness is mistaken; it cannot do justice to the variety and complexity of human experience. To illustrate, I review some examples of aesthetic pleasure and explain why they cannot be reduced merely to the sensory. I conclude with a discussion of the ethical implications of my argument. Some pleasures reach deep into our psychology and are as cognitively rewarding as they are demanding; consequently, pursuing pleasure need not be incompatible with striving for self-perfection.

Women’s Vulnerability and the Realist Novel’s Alternative Judgments, by Adam Kozaczka
How does a community respond to harm done by a man to a woman when he has not committed any legally actionable offense, yet the harm is real? Centuries before #metoo, sentimental epistolary novels like Frances Burney’s Evelina (1778) and novels of manners like Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility (1811) and Pride and Prejudice (1813) took up questions of gender and power to theorize men’s accountability in relation and in opposition to contemporary shifts in legal discourse. Both authors manipulated genre and narration, and navigated legal concepts and terminology, to indict chivalric combat as counterproductive (dueling is represented as both ineffective and anachronistic), and to avoid the harmful publicity of the courtroom (the law proves a greater threat to the women victims than to the perpetrators). Burney and Austen approach the novel as an alternative locus of judgment: they suppress questions of intent by using layered narration and subordinate direct punishment by instead sentencing predatory men to emasculating plots and unhappy endings.

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A Stirring Song Sung Heroic: African Americans from Slavery to Freedom, 1619 to 1865

Jan 29, 2019, 2:15 PM-4:15 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

a photo related to the event

William Earle Williams (Haverford College)

Photographer and curator William Earle Williams presents an Artist Talk in correlation to the SUArt Galleries exhibition, A Stirring Song Sung Heroic: African Americans from Slavery to Freedom, 1619 to 1865. Williams' photographs have been widely exhibited at venues including the National Gallery of Art, Cleveland Art Museum, and the African American Museum, and are in many public collections including the National Gallery of Art, Baltimore Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He has curated over eighty exhibitions featuring the work of Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, Paul Strand, and Harold Edgerton among others.

This exhibition presents the history of American slavery across a series of 135 black and white silver gelatin prints.  These images document mostly anonymous, unheralded, and uncelebrated places in the New World—from the Caribbean to North America—where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom. Archives of prints, newspapers, and other ephemera related to the struggle accompany the work.

A Gallery Reception follows the event, from 5-7 p.m.

Additional supporters:

  • SUArt Galleries
  • Coalition of Museum and Art Centers
  • Department of Transmedia, Transmedia Colloquium Lecture Series

 

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Else Lasker-Schüler’s Modernist Poetry & Translations by Brooks Haxton: A Reading

Jan 30, 2019, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

202 Physics Building

Brooks Haxton (Syracuse University - English)
Karina von Tippelskirch (Syracuse University - Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics)

A century ago, Else Lasker-Schüler was among the most prominent of the German Expressionist poets. She also had a notoriously Bohemian lifestyle. She was nonetheless honored by Germany’s highest literary honor, the Kleist-Preis, in 1932. A year later she left Germany forever. Her art, lifestyle, and Jewish heritage were intolerable to the new Nazi regime. Lasker-Schüler’s poetry is highly original and influential.

Haxton, a poet himself, recently published a book of translations for a generous selection of Lasker-Schüler’s poetry. Haxton will read a selection of his translated poems, and von Tippelskirch will read some of these in the original German. The hour will include coffee, cookies, and conversation about Haxton's choice to translate Lasker-Schüler, and about the art of translation itself.

Additional supporters:
German Program in Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics

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How Do We Know it Works? Reflections on Empirical Studies of Contemplative Practices

Feb 15, 2019, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Sims 123

Josh Felver (Psychology)
Rachel Razza (Falk / Human Development & Family Science)
Qiu Wan (School of Education)

Those who engage in contemplative practice know its positive effects, but documenting its value to others is not always easy. In this panel, Syracuse University authors who have contributed to a new volume, Empirical Studies of Contemplative Practices, discuss how they research contemplative practice to better illustrate its value.

Contemplative Collaborative hosts this book talk, celebrating its editors and authors from five Syracuse colleges (Arts and Sciences, Falk College, the I-School, School of Education, and Visual and Performing Arts). A reception follows the presentation. 

To request accommodations, contact Diane Grimes by February 5.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell and the Rock Biography: A Conversation with Anthony DeCurtis and David Yaffe

Feb 19, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Anthony DeCurtis (Music Critic)
David Yaffe (SU Humanities)

Using his recent book, Lou Reed: A Life (New York: Little, Brown & Company, 2017) as a springboard, DeCurtis talks about the nature and challenges of writing a biography. Yaffe, author of 2017's Reckless Daughter: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell, joins him to discuss the process of sifting through interviews, anecdotes, historical records, personal artifacts, press accounts, public documents and other sources to tell one's story.

Bonus activity:
The Music of Lou Reed, a listening session with conversation
2:00 – 3:20 p.m. in conjuction with "Rock Music" class HOM 378, but open to all
105 Bowne Hall (tentative location)
Contact Theo Cateforis for more information

 


Biography: Anthony DeCurtis, a longtime editor for Rolling Stone magazine, also holds a Ph.D. in American literature from Indiana University, is the author and editor of half a dozen books, and has won numerous awards, including a Grammy for his liner notes to the Eric Clapton box set. Decurtis’s portrait of Reed has already won praise as “the best Reed biography to date” (New York Times Book Review).

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

TENDER R/AGE :: RABIA TIERNA

Feb 21, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Adela C. Licona (University of Arizona)

This Syracuse Symposium keynote address is a call to action. NO CAGES. JAULAS NO. This multimodal interventionist art project circulates as a coalitional gesture. It recognizes that forced separation is not a new practice but one with a long and brutal history connected to colonization, slavery, internment, and imprisonment. In collaboration, Licona contextualizes and connects these histories to specific cruelties presently being enacted on migrant and refugee children and their families at the US/Mexico border. This online and installation-ready project participates visually, textually, and sonically in a collective outcry against the caging of children and other migrants. 

A reception follows the program.


Biography: Adela C. Licona, University of Arizona, Associate Professor of English and Vice Chair of the Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory graduate minor, is affiliated in Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute of the Environment, and Mexican American Studies. Her research and teaching interests include space and visual rhetorics, cultural, ethnic, gender, and sexuality studies, race, borderlands studies, environmental justice, feminist pedagogy, community literacies, action-oriented research and arts-based inquiry.

Licona’s photography has appeared in Versal; Edible Baja Magazine; TRIVIA; Proximities; Terrain; Kairos; Community Literacy; and The Rasp and the Wine. It has been exhibited across the US. She was awarded a 2018 PLAYA Residency. Her series, “Shedding Skin”, with artist-scholar Cara Hagan was awarded Honorable Mention for the “Women Seeing Women” category of the 12th Julia Cameron International Award.

Licona is co-editor of Feminist Pedagogy: Looking Back to Move Forward (JHUP, 2009), author of Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2012), and co-editor of Precarious Rhetorics (OSUP, 2018).

Licona co-directed the Crossroads Collaborative, a Ford Foundation-funded think-and-act research, writing, and teaching collective designed for action-oriented research on youth, sexuality, health, rights, and justice. With graduate students, she co-founded Feminist Action Research in Rhetoric, FARR, a group of progressive feminist scholars committed to public scholarship and community dialogue. She is a member of the Colectivo Fronteristas art collective.

Licona served as Co-Chair of two National Women’s Studies Association Conferences (2015-16), is Editor Emeritus of Feminist Formations, and serves on advisory/editorial boards for QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, Feminist Formations, the Primavera Foundation, and the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam, a project of Spoken Futures.


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
  • Lender Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

RELATE: A Workshop on Engaged Scholarship

Feb 22, 2019, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Adela C. Licona (University of Arizona)

Licona engages participants in a shared dialogue about action-oriented, interdisciplinary approaches to community building and engagement through a relational, borderlands framework. Fostering collaboration, forging coalition, and enacting multiple methodologies to spark multidimensional imaginaries and bridge art with action will be discussed.

To RSVP, contact humcenter@syr.edu by February 13 and include any accessibility requests.


Biography: Adela C. Licona, University of Arizona, Associate Professor of English and Vice Chair of the Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory graduate minor, is affiliated in Gender and Women’s Studies, Institute of the Environment, and Mexican American Studies. Her research and teaching interests include space and visual rhetorics, cultural, ethnic, gender, and sexuality studies, race, borderlands studies, environmental justice, feminist pedagogy, community literacies, action-oriented research and arts-based inquiry.

Licona’s photography has appeared in Versal; Edible Baja Magazine; TRIVIA; Proximities; Terrain; Kairos; Community Literacy; and The Rasp and the Wine. It has been exhibited across the US. She was awarded a 2018 PLAYA Residency. Her series, “Shedding Skin”, with artist-scholar Cara Hagan was awarded Honorable Mention for the “Women Seeing Women” category of the 12th Julia Cameron International Award.

Licona is co-editor of Feminist Pedagogy: Looking Back to Move Forward (JHUP, 2009), author of Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2012), and co-editor of Precarious Rhetorics (OSUP, 2018).

Licona co-directed the Crossroads Collaborative, a Ford Foundation-funded think-and-act research, writing, and teaching collective designed for action-oriented research on youth, sexuality, health, rights, and justice. With graduate students, she co-founded Feminist Action Research in Rhetoric, FARR, a group of progressive feminist scholars committed to public scholarship and community dialogue. She is a member of the Colectivo Fronteristas art collective.

Licona served as Co-Chair of two National Women’s Studies Association Conferences (2015-16), is Editor Emeritus of Feminist Formations, and serves on advisory/editorial boards for QED: A Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking, Feminist Formations, the Primavera Foundation, and the Tucson Youth Poetry Slam, a project of Spoken Futures.


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
  • Lender Center
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Stories We are Told, Stories We Tell: Explorations in Ethnographic Methods

Feb 26, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Strasser Legacy Room, 220 Eggers

Kirin Narayan (Australian National University)
Joyce Flueckiger (Emory University)
Corrine Dempsey (Nazareth College)
Priti Ramamurthy (University of Washington)

In recognition of the careers of two South Asian Studies faculty at SU, Susan S. Wadley and Ann Grodzins Gold, Anthropology, Religion, and South Asian Studies host a panel of renowned scholars sharing stories about their work in and beyond India.

Additional supporters:
Ray Smith Symposium

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No Innocence "This Side of the Womb" : Confronting Issues of Privilege, Diversity and Inclusion, from Syracuse to South Africa

Feb 28, 2019, 9:30 AM-5:00 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

This symposium-format event brings together U.S. and South African artists, academics, policy makers, journalists and the audience to analyze how we have responded to our shared struggles. Images and sounds of South Africa surround participants engaging in rotating panel discussions. This is an opportunity to examine our many similarities without ignoring our differences and distinct histories, and to recognize and reflect on shared struggles of racism, poverty and privilege confronting South Africa and Syracuse.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Undoing Bad Press: Rethinking Haudenosaunee Historical Events Erroneously Portrayed in the Jesuit Relations

Mar 5, 2019, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Susan Hill (University of Toronto)

The appearance of the French Jesuits at Onondaga Lake from 1656-58 has been narrated as a triumphal story of first contact with the Onondaga Nation. This is profoundly different from the Onondaga versions of this encounter that are recorded in wampum belts and told in oral stories.  Hill's talk examines the gap between written and oral versions or this encounter.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Indigenous Haudenosaunee Stories of the 17th Century Encounter with the Jesuits

Mar 6, 2019, 11:00 AM-1:00 PM

Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center, 6680 Onondaga Lake Parkway, Liverpool

Susan Hill (University of Toronto)
Philip Arnold (Syracuse University)
Scott Manning Stevens (Syracuse University)

Religion hosts a panel discussion and workshop at the Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center, followed by a traditional Haudenosaunee lunch. RSVP by February 26 to Deborah Prattand include any accessibility acommodation requests.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Build: The Power of Hip Hop in a Divided World

Mar 7, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Mark Katz (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

In this public lecture, Katz tells the little-known story of the emergence of hip-hop diplomacy, explaining the circumstances that led the State Department to invest significant resources into sending hip-hop artists around the world as cultural ambassadors.

Additional supporters:

CNY Humanities Corridor [Sound and Media Working Group]

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Restorative Justice and Education

Mar 7, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Watson Auditorium

Maisha Winn (University of California-Davis)

Winn, Chancellor's Leadership Professor, and Co-Director of Transformative Justice in Education at UC Davis gives a talk and leads a workshop on restorative justice and education. This session will appeal to teachers and scholars in Education, Composition and Cultural Rhetoric, African American Studies, as well as the local community.

CART will be provided. Contact suschoolofed@syr.edu or 315-443-4696 to request other accessibility accommodations.

This event is co-sponsored by the School of Education and the LLC5 Incarceration and Decarceration working group of the Central New York Humanities Corridor, from an award by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Man On Fire (Film Screening)

Mar 21, 2019, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Kittredge Auditorium, HB Crouse

James Chase Sanchez (Middlebury College)

Sanchez's documentary Man on Fire untangles the pieces of Charles Moore’s life tracing the reasons he conducted a self-immolation protest against racism in 2014. It illustrates the racism of Moore’s hometown of Grand Saline, Texas and how residents of the town dealt with the aftermath of Moore’s death. Q&A time with the filmmaker follows the screening.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies Rhetoric and Composition
  • Center for Teaching Excellence
  • Film Studies
  • African American Studies
  • Lender Center for Social Justice
  • La Casita Cultural Center
  • The Maxwell School
  • Department of English
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • First Year Experience
  • Language Literatures and Linguistics
  • School of Education
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Designing Stories of Abolition and Coalition: Illuminating History in Central New York

Mar 21, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

Nancy Cantor Warehouse, 350 W. Fayette Street

Jeffrey Ludwig (Seward House and Museum)
Peter Hyde (Peter Hyde Designs)
Andrew Saluti (SU Graduate Program in Museum Studies), moderator

Panelists Ludwig and Hyde use their new exhibition (as curator and designer, respectively) about the Seward House, Underground Railroad, and Margaret Stewart, niece of Harriet Tubman; as a foundation for conversation about the collaborative process of designing and interpreting history.

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Talking About Race

Mar 22, 2019, 2:15 PM-3:45 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

James Chase Sanchez (Middlebury College)

This teaching workshop offers interested students and scholars an innovative take on current debates surrounding activism, white supremacy, and racism, while providing practical ways for faculty and instructors to engage in these issues in the classroom.

Additional supporters:

  • Department of Writing Studies Rhetoric and Composition
  • Center for Teaching Excellence
  • Film Studies
  • African American Studies
  • Lender Center for Social Justice
  • La Casita Cultural Center
  • The Maxwell School
  • Department of English
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • First Year Experience
  • Language Literatures and Linguistics
  • School of Education
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Larry Blumenfeld: Watson Visiting Professor in Residency

Mar 25, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Dates, times, and locations vary: see listings below

a photo related to the event

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

 

Jazz in Troubled Times: The Relevance and Resonance of a Culture

Through a two-week residency at Syracuse University as Watson Visiting Professor for 2019, cultural journalist and music critic Larry Blumenfeld examines jazz as an aesthetic construct, a living culture, a language of many dialects, a personalized science and a framework for thought and action as related to social justice. Through lectures, presentations, workshops and public discussions, he looks beyond conventional histories and limitations of genre and style to tell stories of empowering legacies, ongoing struggles and essential cross-cultural connections. He proposes jazz as a resonant form and relevant framework for understanding personal and communal identities in turbulent times. He also investigates timeless traditions of improvisation, and the current relationship between arts and activism. In doing so, Blumenfeld draws on his 30 years of journalism and criticism; his immersion in the jazz cultures of New York, New Orleans and Havana; and his ongoing dialogues with celebrated musicians.

Scheduled events:

Monday, March 25, 4:30-6 p.m.
Welcome Reception for Larry Blumenfeld
Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Tuesday, March 26, 5-6:30 p.m.
Chicago Fire: The Men and Women of the AACM, and Their Enduring Power
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Wednesday, March 27, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Writing About Improvisation: A Workshop
304 Tolley Humanities Building

Friday, March 29, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
La Conexión Cubana (The Cuban Connection), featuring Yosvany Terry Quartet in performance
La Casita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco Street

Monday, April 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Armstrong in Prison: The Fight for New Orleans Jazz Culture Since the Flood
Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Tuesday, April 2, 6:30-8 p.m.
How Does Jazz Survive (and Thrive)?
Lender Auditorium, 007 Whitman School of Management

Wednesday, April 3, 2-4 p.m.
The Answer is Culture: A Roundtable Discussion About Arts, Activism and Cultural Policy
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Thursday, April 4, 12:30-2 p.m.
Jazz Listening Party, with Belfer Archives
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Friday, April 5, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
'Gangsterism' on Campus: A Conversation About Jazz, Race, Creative Intent, featuring Jason Moran, followed by a solo-piano performance
Hendricks Chapel


BIOGRAPHY: Larry Blumenfeld is a culture reporter, music critic and lecturer, who writes regularly for The Wall Street Journal, and has contributed to many newspapers, magazines, scholarly essay collections and websites. His work focuses on jazz and Afro-Latin music, and on the intersections between culture, politics and activism. His research as a Katrina Media Fellow for the Open Society Institute inspired a book about cultural recovery in New Orleans, due next year from the University of California Press. He was a National Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He curates Spoleto Festival USA’s jazz series; the Deer Isle Jazz Festival in Stonington, Maine; and the National Jazz Museum in Harlem’s series, 'Jazz and Social Justice.'


Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

The 2019 Watson Professor residency is hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and Assistant Professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Welcome Reception for Larry Blumenfeld

Mar 25, 2019, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

Join us in celebrating this year's Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities, Larry Blumenfeld.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

The 2019 Watson Professor residency is hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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On Writing and Translating Dézafi

Mar 25, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Bird Library (T.B.A.)

Frankétienne (Haiti)
Asselin Charles (Sheridan College, Toronto)

Author Frankétienne and his translator Charles discuss the Haitian Creole writings in Dézafi (1975), recently published in English (University of Virginia Press, 2018). This talk focuses on the challenges of translating a relatively new language into a language as old and prestigious as English.

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Excerpts from Dézafi by Frankétienne

Mar 26, 2019, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM

CFAC Art Gallery, 805 E. Genesee Street

Frankétienne (Haiti)
Asselin Charles (Sheridan College, Toronto)

Frankétienne and his English translator Charles will present, then read in Haitian and English excerpts from the novel, Dézafi (1975).

This iconic story, just published in English (University of Virginia Press, 2018), is by all measures a great humanistic work. By rewriting the myth of the zombie resurrected by the salt, the Haitian writer calls attention to his peoples' struggle for freedom, but also -- and above all -- to the richness of their verbal expression and storytelling tradition. Event includes lunch.

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Chicago Fire: The Men and Women of the A.A.C.M. and Their Enduring Power

Mar 26, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn, NY)

A meeting at a musician’s home on Chicago’s South Side more than 50 years ago sparked an engine of creative inspiration and practical outreach that has since touched nearly all corners of modern music -- the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM). It is hard to imagine the aesthetic and function of today’s jazz absent that influence.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Writing About Improvisation

Mar 27, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

What do improvisers do? How does improvisation function? This workshop—for writers of all kinds—seeks a deepened understanding of improvisational languages across all disciplines, and examines tensions between form and improvisation to achieve clearer understanding of an elusive concept.

Space is limited. Please RSVP by March 8 to Eric Grode and include any accommodation requests.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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La Conexión Cubana (The Cuban Connection)

Mar 29, 2019, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

La Casita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco St.

Public discussion followed by performance by Yosvany Terry Quartet

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)
Yosvany Terry (Harlem, NY)

Beyond misguided notions of “Latin Jazz” lies an essential cross-cultural truth that binds Afro-Cuban traditions with jazz in the United States. This connection reveals shared histories, parallel developments, contrasting social structures and embattled politics. Saxophonist and checkere master Yosvany Terry, who directs the jazz ensemble at Harvard University, will discuss these bonds with Blumenfeld, and then demonstrate them through a quartet performance.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Armstrong in Prison: The Fight for New Orleans Jazz Culture Since the Flood

Apr 1, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

After the flood that resulted from the levee failures following Hurricane Katrina, was New Orleans jazz culture welcomed back? Not exactly. Drawing on more than a decade of research and immersive reporting as a Katrina Media Fellow for the Open Society Institute, Blumenfeld documents how jazz culture served as an essential infrastructure for recovery, and yet met with resistance. He details tensions between the city’s storied culture and its power brokers, revealing the city’s ambivalence toward its signature culture and the issues of race and class coursing through a “new” New Orleans.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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How Does Jazz Survive (and Thrive)?

Apr 2, 2019, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Lender Auditorium, 007 Whitman School of Management

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)
Larry Luttinger (Central New York Jazz Arts Foundation)

Long past its moment at the forefront of popular culture, jazz finds itself in a challenged space. The club circuit is fading, the music business in disrepair. What makes for a sustainable jazz scene? Blumenfeld considers this question in local and national terms, along with guest speaker, Larry Luttinger.

This dialogue is co-presented by the Bandier Program's Soyars Leadership Lecture Series.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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The Answer Is Culture: A Roundtable Discussion About Arts, Activism and Cultural Policy

Apr 3, 2019, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)
Kal Alston (Syracuse University, Cultural Foundations of Education)
James Gordon Williams (Syracuse University, African American Studies)
Roger Hallas (Syracuse University, English and SU Human Rights Film Festival)

Can a song change a mind? A photograph spark a movement? A film fight injustice? How does culture intersect with social justice? How do arts fuel activism, and vice versa? This roundtable discussion considers relevant legacies, current policies and possible strategies.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Jazz Listening Party with Belfer Archives

Apr 4, 2019, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

All are welcome to listen and comment at this session coordinated with assistance from the Belfer Archives. Send any accessibility requests to the Humanities Center by March 27.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Rooms Remembered: A Reading by Poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar

Apr 4, 2019, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

Acclaimed poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar’s four books exquisitely demonstrate how the unique particulars of an individual’s life stories -- the horrors of anti-Semitism, the pain of childhood neglect and abuse, the grief of losing a spouse -- can, through the filter of art, shimmer with universal truths. Audience Q&A follows her reading.


Biography: Laure-Anne Bosselaar is the author and of The Hour Between Dog and Wolf, and of  Small Gods of Grief which was awarded the Isabella Gardner Prize for Poetry. Her third poetry collection, A New Hunger, was selected as an ALA Notable Book in 2008. Her next book, These Many Rooms, will be published in January 2019. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, and her poems have appeared such publications as The Washington Post, Georgia Review, Harvard Review, and Ploughshares, among others. She is also the editor of four anthologies: Night Out: Poems about Hotels, Motels, Restaurants and Bars, Outsiders: Poems about Rebels, Exiles and Renegades, Urban Nature: Poems about Wildlife in the Cities, and Never Before: Poems about First Experiences. She taught poetry at Emerson College and at the MFA in Creative Writing Program at Sarah Lawrence College, and also served as the McEver Chair for Visiting Writers at Georgia Tech University in Atlanta, Georgia. Currently, she is a member of the founding faculty at the Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program of Pine Manor College.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Writing Your Times: Poetry, Narrative, and Witness

Apr 5, 2019, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Laure-Anne Bosselaar (Pine Manor College)

Following an evening of poetry, Bosselaar conducts this mini-seminar designed for serious writers and instructors, advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, creative writing MFA students from Syracuse University, and faculty members from both programs.

To RSVP, contact Phil Memmer [315-474-6851 x328] by March 28 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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From Historiography to Philosophical Engagement: The Future of Islamic Philosophy

Apr 5, 2019, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

How can Arabic and Islamic philosophy actively contribute to contemporary philosophical debates? How can a philosophical rather than a historiographical approach to the study of this tradition contribute to the much needed diversity in the study and pedagogy of philosophy and the humanities at large? This keynote address kicks off a 2-day conference responding to these questions.

Additional supporters:

  • Middle East Studies Program
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Women's & Gender Studies 
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'Gangsterism' on Campus: A Conversation About Jazz, Race, Creative Intent

Apr 5, 2019, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM

Hendricks Chapel

Jason Moran (Pianist, Visual Artist)
Larry Blumenfeld (Brooklyn,NY)

Since his arrival on the music scene in the 1990s, Jason Moran has established himself as a restless innovator and a guardian of traditions, a singular leader and a selfless collaborator, and an artist and thinker bent on re-imagining jazz culture and its connections to wider worlds. His music spans ensembles of many forms, symphony orchestras and film scores. He has worked with celebrated visual artists including Carrie Mae Weems, Adrian Piper and Kara Walker, and mounted exhibitions of his own visual art. As the Kennedy Center’s artistic director for jazz, as at museums and other arts institutions, he has reconsidered the presenter’s mission. For the title of his series of “Gangsterism” compositions, Moran lifted a term off the canvas of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s painting “Hollywood Africans.” For the feeling and intent of his music, he has never lost sight of pianist Thelonious Monk, who he calls “the most important musician, period.”

Here, Blumenfeld extends a dialogue that has stretched across three decades and spilled out in many articles. Following the conversation, Moran performs solo at the piano.

Additional supporters:

  • Council on Diversity and Inclusion
  • S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
  • Goldring Arts Journalistm Program
  • Hendricks Chapel
  • Museum Studies
  • English / Creative Writing
  • School of Education
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • SUArt Galleries
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Setnor School of Music
  • Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • History
  • Samba Laranja
  • CNY Jazz Central
  • Belfer Archives
  • Special Collections Resource Center
  • WAER

This event is part of the 2019 Watson Professor residency hosted by Eric Grode - director of the Goldring Arts Journalism Program, and assistant professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

From Gods to Social Justice: Indian Folk Artists Challenging Traditions (Opening Reception)

Apr 6, 2019, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

ArtRage Gallery, 505 Hawley Avenue, Syracuse

This exhibition showcases two painting styles from eastern India -- Mithila Painting and Patua Scrolls -- which at their core are about telling stories. However, the types of stories that the artists tell through their art have changed overtime.  Both of these art forms have morphed and changed in contemporary India, creating space for artists to use their art to comment on issues facing their lives, their nation and the planet. Their work deals with a variety of injustices such as violence against women, female infanticide, political corruption, climate change, and war.

This exhibit runs through May 18.

Additional supporters:

  • Ray Smith Symposium
  • South Asia Center
  • Art and Music Histories
  • Anthropology
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Studying Dante’s Religious Culture and the Problem of the Beatific Vision: Questions of Method

Apr 10, 2019, 5:00 PM-6:15 PM

Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library

Zygmunt G. Barański (University of Notre Dame)

Barański examines the unsystematic treatment of Dante’s religious culture in scholarship, with particular attention to the poet’s treatment of the issue of heavenly beatitude in the Commedias final canticle, Paradiso. His engaging lecture style combined with his meticulous research methods and the far-reaching implications of his work on Dante and medieval Italian literature promise to inspire everyone from language and poetry scholars to medievalists from diverse interdisciplinary backgrounds.

Biography: Zygmunt G. Barański is Serena Professor of Italian Emeritus at the University of Cambridge and Notre Dame Professor of Dante & Italian Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He has published extensively on Dante and on medieval and modern Italian literature and culture. For many years he was senior editor of The Italianist, and currently holds the same position with Le tre corone.


Additional supporters:

  • Medieval Renaissance Group
  • Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
  • SU Libraries
  • History
  • English
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Granada-Tetuan: A Search for the Common Roots of Andalusian and Flamenco Music

Apr 11, 2019, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Heroy Geology Building Auditorium

a photo related to the event

Eva Manzano (dance)
Antonio “El Turry” (voice)
Suhail Serghini (guitar, strings)

This exciting, educational presentation traces the development of music in southern Spain focusing on north African roots. The historical and artistic relationship between the Spanish city of Granada and the Moroccan city of Tetuan become apparent in the transnational, cross-cultural influences found in musical expression. Eva Manzano, an accomplished flamenco dancer, leads the group through the development of dance styles that reflect the long-standing historical exchange between the south of Spain and Morocco. The program features accompaniment by guitarist Suhail Serghini, who also plays the north African lute and other instruments, and vocalist “El Turry.”

This event at Syracuse University is part of a week-long series of events including a performance at the Le Moyne College Performing Arts Center, dance workshops and instrument demonstrations.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

And Then They Came For Us

Apr 11, 2019, 5:00 PM-8:00 PM

207 Hall of Languages

A two-day interdisciplinary symposium exploring the theme of authoritarianism over the past century begins with a film screening of And Then They Came For Us (2017, Abby Ginzberg, Ken Schneider). CART and film captioning provided.
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Challenging Authoritarianism: Stories and Strategies of Resistance

Apr 12, 2019, 9:00 AM-3:30 PM

Strasser Legacy Room, Eggers 220

This two-day interdisciplinary symposium -- beginning with a film screening on April 11 -- explores the theme of authoritarianism over the past century. From the Japanese-American internment to the fall of the Berlin Wall to the "Travel Ban," this day of reflection examines stories and strategies that individuals and institutions have adopted to challenge and thwart authoritarianism.

9:00 - 10:30 a.m., Eggers 220
US and the World Workshop: Revisiting 1989 (and the End of History)
This workshop revisits the tumultuous events of Spring 1989 and the hope and tensions of democratic transitions from authoritarian rule.

Participants:

  • Graham Wilson, US State Department, Office of the Historian
  • Adam Howard, US State Department, Office of the Historian
  • Osamah Khalil, SU History (moderator)

2:00 - 3:30 p.m., Eggers 220
Immigration, Nationalism & Authoritarianism
This roundtable discussion will examine the reactionary policies toward immigration adopted in the United States and Europe.

Participants:

  • Janice Dowell, SU Philosphy
  • Shana Gadarian, SU Political Science
  • Andrew Kim, SU Law
  • Audie Klotz, SU Political Science
  • Jamie Winders, SU Geography

RSVP by April 5 to Osamah Khalil; include any accessibility accommodation requestion.

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4th Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2019, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date and check back for the details about our annual showcase celebrating books in the humanities by Syracuse University authors and editors, (copyright 2018). 

Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Syracuse University Bookstore
  • Syracuse University Office of Research
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Undead Archive: the Speculative Histories of Adam and Zack Khalil

Apr 18, 2019, 6:30 PM-8:30 PM

Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison Street

Adam Khalil (filmmaker)
Zack Khalil (filmmaker)

Emerging filmmakers Adam and Zack Khalil present recent works, including their acclaimed debut INAATSE/SE/, which re-imagines a traditional Anishshinaabe story and explores its resonance through the generations in their indigenous community. Audience Q&A follows the screening, with coordinated exhibition at Urban Video Project.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Now More Than Ever: The Political Urgency of Community Archives

Apr 23, 2019, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

a photo related to the event

Michelle Caswell (University of California, Los Angeles)
Samip Mallick (South Asian American Digital Archive)

Stories have the powerful ability not only to chronicle the histories of communities, but also to enable the cyclical nature of privilege and systemic oppression by the dominant cultures who disseminate them. In this talk, Caswell and Mallic -- co-founders of the South Asian American Digital Archive (SAADA) -- explore how members of communities marginalized by white supremacy and heteropatriarchy imagine archives as potential sites of disruption of these oppressive cycles.

Caswell and Mallick argue that archivists make more liberatory interventions in disrupting white supremacy and patriarchy in archival practice, going beyond the standard solutions of diverse collecting and inclusive description. In so doing, they will explore emerging examples from their own pedagogical and archival practices to illustrate possibilities for archival disruption, and galvanize archivists to embrace activism during times of
political and social crisis.


Additional supporters:

  • School of Information Studies
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Department of History at the Maxwell School
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • South Asia Center
  • Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC)
  • Eastern New York Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ENY/ACRL)
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

How to Tell Your Community's Story

Apr 24, 2019, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Michelle Caswell (University of California, Los Angeles)
Samip Mallick (South Asian American Digital Archive)

In follow up to their public lecture, SAADA co-founders Mallick and Caswell host an interactive workshop to guide participants through the process of starting and building community archives, sharing stories about what worked and what didn't. Topics include how to get started, developing a collection focus, building relationships with donors, fundraising, and more.

RSVP by April 17 to Tarida Anantachai; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Additional supporters:

  • School of Information Studies
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Department of History at the Maxwell School
  • Office of Multicultural Affairs
  • South Asia Center
  • Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC)
  • Eastern New York Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ENY/ACRL)
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From Boccaccio to Pico, and Garibaldi: The Virtual Humanities Lab at Brown University

Apr 24, 2019, 12:45 PM-2:15 PM

T.B.D.

Massimo Riva (Brown University)

Riva discusses an important digital humanities project developed at The Virtual Humanities Lab (VHL) at Brown University, created in 2004 from a two-year grant from the NEH. Since its inception, Massimo has coordinated this international endeavor with contributions from scholars across the U.S., Europe, Latin America, and Australia. Early projects included The Decameron Web and the Brown-University of Bologna Pico della Mirandola Project.

In its early phase, collaborative editing was seen as a meaningful way to engage new techniques and methodologies applied to a textual typology representative of the Italian humanist tradition. More recently, in collaboration with the Brown Library, the VHL has included projects which focus on the development of special collections and archives, with an emphasis on visualization, such as the Garibaldi Panorama & the Risorgimento Archive, and the Theater that Was Rome. 

Finallythe presentation will touch upon the latest initiative led by Riva: a pilot project of the Brown Digital Publications Initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, consisting in a digital monograph focused on a genealogy of Virtual Reality in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries. All are welcome to this free, public talk.

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Humanities NY Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Presentations

May 3, 2019, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Camilla Bell (Ph.D. Student, Cultural Foundations of Education)
Gemma Cooper-Novack (Ph.D. Student, Literacy Education)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss their experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects.

Save the date: more info coming soon!

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