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CUSE Grant Application Humanities Information Session

Jan 29, 2021, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Virtual

Christina Leigh Docteur (Director, Proposal Support Services)
Sarah Workman (Assistant Director, Proposal Development-Humanities)

Syracuse University’s Office of Research has announced the request for proposals for the 2021 Collaboration for Unprecedented Success and Excellence (CUSE) Grant Program. In support of humanities research across campus and to best prepare humanities faculty to apply to the 2021 CUSE Grant Program, the Syracuse University Humanities Center and the Office of Research will jointly offer an information session on the 2021 CUSE Grant program, including tips and tricks for successful applications in the humanities.

The purpose of this intramural grant program is to enhance interdisciplinary collaborations, to grow the research enterprise and enhance scholarship at Syracuse University in order to increase extramural funding and high-quality scholarly output. The program is designed to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

Guidance about the online submission process will be included in a general CUSE Grant Application Information Session on January 20. The deadline for CUSE Grant applications is 5:00 p.m., Monday, March 1.

Register here. [Upon registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.]

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Vico's Poetic Wisdom: Lessons for the Contemporary World

Jan 29, 2021, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Virtual

Giulio Goria (Universita' Vita Salute San Raffaele)

This is part one of a two-day virtual seminar devoted to exploring the relevance of Italian philosopher Giambattista Vico for the contemporary world. On January 29 and February 5, Dr. Goria, Research Fellow at Universita' Vita Salute San Raffaele in Milan delivers a brief lecture on aspects of Vico's thought, leading participants to learn, appreciate, and critically analyze aspects of Vico's philosophy, especially in relation to rhetoric, poetic wisdom, and the function of the imagination in the political world. 

Registration required. Contact Silvia Benso for additional information.

This event is organized by Theorizing Italy (PCT11), a working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Vico's Poetic Wisdom: Lessons for the Contemporary World

Feb 5, 2021, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Virtual

Giulio Goria (Universita' Vita Salute San Raffaele)

This is the second of a two-day virtual seminar devoted to exploring the relevance of Italian philosopher Giambattista Vico for the contemporary world. On January 29 and February 5, Dr. Goria, Research Fellow at Universita' Vita Salute San Raffaele in Milan delivers a brief lecture on aspects of Vico's thought, leading participants to learn, appreciate, and critically analyze aspects of Vico's philosophy, especially in relation to rhetoric, poetic wisdom, and the function of the imagination in the political world. 

Registration required. Contact Silvia Benso for additional information.

This event is organized by Theorizing Italy (PCT11), a working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Data Feminism Reading Group

Feb 9, 2021, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Virtual

Join researchers from other New York State institutions to read and discuss groundbreaking 2020 work by Catherine D'Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein in Data Feminism.

Meet others nearby who care about data science and data ethics. Attend one or more sessions below to seek critical new understandings of the ways that current data science practice shapes our research and our world.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)

Register here.

Sponsored by the New York Data Carpentry Library Consortium (NYDCLC) and the Central New York Humanities Corridor.

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Looking Back, Looking Forward: Choices, Careers and Living Black History

Feb 11, 2021, 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Virtual

Daina Ramey Berry (University of Texas at Austin)
Erica Armstrong Dunbar (Rutgers University)
P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)
Shirley Moody-Turner (Pennsylvania State University)

In this inaugural event launching P. Gabrielle Foreman's 2021 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship at the Syracuse University Humanities Center, three Black women scholars and institution builders (Foreman, Daina Ramey Berry, and Erica Armstrong Dunbar) discuss their innovative scholarship, transformative advocacy, and how they’ve overcome the challenges of centering Black women’s lives, resistance, and intellectual contributions. Shirley Moody-Turner moderates this interdisciplinary dialogue.  

CART provided. Register here by Feb. 9.

Download a printable schedule of Foreman's virtual involvements on campus for Spring 2021.


Biography: P. Gabrielle Foreman is Co-Director of the Center for Black Digital Research/#DigBlk; Professor of English, African American Studies and History; and Paterno Family Chair of Liberal Arts at Pennsylvania State University. She is the founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, which brings to life seven decades of nineteenth-century Black organizing for educational access, labor justice, voting rights and freedom from state-sanctioned violence. Her publications include Activist Sentiments: Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century, the Penguin edition of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig, which first recovered Wilson’s life as an important hair care entrepreneur and spiritualist speaker, and the first edited collection on Black-led state and national activism spanning seven decades and crossing America, The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century.


Additional supporters:

  • African American Studies Department
  • English Department
  • History Department
  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • Office of Special Events
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Women’s and Gender Studies Department
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group-Culture and Democracy in 19th-Century NY
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group-Digital Humanities

This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center; and Patricia Roylance, Associate Professor of English.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Publishing Your Humanities Book: Know Your Audience, Reach Your Readers

Feb 19, 2021, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

virtual

Margo Irvin (Standford University Press)
Erica Wetter (Stanford University Press)

The Syracuse University Humanities Center, Office of Research, and College of Arts and Sciences are pleased to host two editors from Stanford University Press offering insightful information about publishing your humanities book.

Register for the general session by Feb. 12 and include any accessibility accommodation requests. 

Additional Opportunity!

Following the general session at noon, Irvin and Wetter have set aside additional time for one-on-one consultation with faculty who have questions related to their specific humanities book projects. These brief meetings will be scheduled on the half hour -- between 2:00 and 6:00 pm on 2/19/21. A wait-list will be created if interest exceeds limited slots. [NOTE: Those who request individual consultation are expected to attend the general session at noon.]

Request an individual consultation here by Feb. 12 and include any accessibility accommodation requests.


Biographies:

Margo Irvin, Acquisitions Editor, acquires in history, Jewish studies, Asian American studies, and Latin American studies. In history, Margo's list includes modern European and world history, colonial and modern Latin American history, and a new strand in American history with a particular focus on the history of the American West and transnational US histories. She is particularly interested in projects that take up questions around histories of empire, imperialism, and colonialism; nationalism and citizenship; migration and borderlands; the history of science, technology, computing, and information; and the intersections of medicine and health with gender and race. Margo acquires for two long-running interdisciplinary series: Asian America and Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture. She is also the press editor for Stanford Studies on Central and Eastern Europe and the Cold War International History Project series. 

Erica Wetter, Executive Editor, acquires books in Literature, Philosophy, and Religion. Her list encompasses work in political theory, art, media, and cultural studies, and she is particularly seeking projects that attempt to make significant critical interventions while asking questions of contemporary relevance. She welcomes accessible, broadly conceived projects on politics, gender, race, science, technology, and media and is especially open to discussing more interdisciplinary works as well as books that attempt some form of narrative innovation. Erica holds an MLIS and an MS in Environmental Studies and is also committed to publishing rigorous work in environmental humanities. Her portfolio includes several series, such as Text TechnologiesPost45Cultural Memory in the PresentEncountering Traditions, and Spiritual Phenomena

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Data Feminism Reading Group

Feb 23, 2021, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Virtual

Join researchers from other New York State institutions to read and discuss groundbreaking 2020 work by Catherine D'Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein in Data Feminism.

Meet others nearby who care about data science and data ethics. Attend one or more sessions below to seek critical new understandings of the ways that current data science practice shapes our research and our world.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)

Register here.

Sponsored by the New York Data Carpentry Library Consortium (NYDCLC) and the Central New York Humanities Corridor.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In the Bush: Writings by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

Feb 24, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Join discussion of selected readings by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson—an indigenous writer, musician and scholar—to include the article, “Land as Pedagogy,” and the forthcoming "Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies," as suggested additional reading.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Native and Indigenous Studies
  • Disability Studies
  • Native Students Program
  • Resilient Indigenous Action Collective
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World

Feb 25, 2021, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Virtual

Jessica Marie Johnson (Johns Hopkins University)

The CNY Early Americas Consortium hosts a virtual book club with Dr. Johnson, Assistant Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University, and author of Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2020). Via Zoom, Johnson discusses her recent book and reflects on its contributions to early American and Atlantic history.

Attendees are encouraged to read “Wicked Flesh” in advance of the meeting, and to ask questions or offer comments that engage with the work. Consortium members will bring their perspectives and approaches from early American, Latin American, and Caribbean history to the conversation, fostering intellectually stimulating discussions across disciplinary boundaries. A limited number of graduate students from participating Corridor institutions are eligible to receive a free copy of "Wicked Flesh." Please contact organizers for details.

Registration required. Contact Tessa Murphy for additional information.

This event is organized by the CNY Early Americas Consortium (HS11), a working group of the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Strategies for Academic Success: Know Your Value/s – BIPOC Focused

Feb 26, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:30 PM

Virtual

P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)

What values inspire you and drive your work? How can you develop a professional mission statement tied to those values? How can we shift our ideas about ourselves as scholars, and about mentoring—and reframe our notions of a singular mentor? This first of two workshops hosted by Watson Professor Foreman is intended specifically for Black, Indigenous, people of color [BIPOC] faculty, staff, and administrators at Syracuse University. A second session for others is March 5.

Space is limited; please submit a request to participate by Feb. 21 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Download a printable schedule of Foreman's virtual involvements on campus for Spring 2021.


Biography: P. Gabrielle Foreman is Co-Director of the Center for Black Digital Research/#DigBlk; Professor of English, African American Studies and History; and Paterno Family Chair of Liberal Arts at Pennsylvania State University. She is the founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, which brings to life seven decades of nineteenth-century Black organizing for educational access, labor justice, voting rights and freedom from state-sanctioned violence. Her publications include Activist Sentiments: Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century, the Penguin edition of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig, which first recovered Wilson’s life as an important hair care entrepreneur and spiritualist speaker, and the first edited collection on Black-led state and national activism spanning seven decades and crossing America, The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century.


Additional supporters:

  • African American Studies Department
  • English Department
  • History Department
  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • Office of Special Events
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Women’s and Gender Studies Department
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group-Culture and Democracy in 19th-Century NY
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group-Digital Humanities

This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center; and Patricia Roylance, Associate Professor of English.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Resettling: A Film Screening and Conversation with the 2020-21 Narratio Fellows

Feb 26, 2021, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Ana Vîjdea (Narratio Artist-in-Residence, 2020-21)
Ahmed Badr (Narratio.org founder)

2020-21 Narratio Fellows:

Isho Adan (Onondaga Community College)
Hawa Ahmed (Nottingham H.S.)
Rayan Mohamed (Henninger H.S.)
Felone Nganga (Henninger H.S.)
Hibbatullah Shaalan (Nottingham H.S.)
Aman Yohannes (Onondaga Community College)
Participate in an inaugural screening of seven short autobiographical films by refugee youth about their day-to-day lives during the pandemic and in the context of resettlement and a global movement for racial justice. Film screenings will be followed by virtual discussion of the power of storying lives through film. Read more about the creation of this work, through their summer fellowship program.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”  Additional support comes from the College of Arts & Sciences celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2021.

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The 2020 Nagorno Karabakh War: Actors, Antecedents, and Aftermath

Mar 3, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual

Khatchig Mouradian (Columbia  University)

This illustrated lecture maps the trajectory and humanitarian toll of the 2020 war in Nagorno Karabakh, and explores its historical and geopolitical contexts. Outlining the antecedents of the conflict from WWI to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the lecture identifies pogroms, propaganda campaigns, and policy decisions that cast a shadow across generations in the South Caucasus. Unpacking domestic developments within post-Soviet Armenia and Azerbaijan and their impact on the negotiations between the two countries, the lecture tracks the process that led to unsettling a “frozen conflict,” and the role played by regional actors, chief among them Turkey, in detonating it in the middle of a raging pandemic.

Please contact Julia White for more information or to register.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Biidaaban: Indigenous Knowledges, Resistance, and Resilience

Mar 4, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Virtual Event

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and Amanda Strong answer your questions about the film Biidaaban (The Dawn Comes) -- a short film screened during the session -- maple sugaring, Indigenous resurgence and rematriation.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Native and Indigenous Studies
  • Disability Studies
  • Native Students Program
  • Resilient Indigenous Action Collective
  • Cultural Foundations of Education
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Strategies for Academic Success: Know Your Value/s

Mar 5, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:30 PM

Virtual

P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)

What values inspire you and drive your work? How can you develop a professional mission statement tied to those values? How can we shift our ideas about ourselves as scholars, and about mentoring—and reframe our notions of a singular mentor? This Friday workshop hosted by Watson Professor Foreman is open to Syracuse University faculty, staff, and administrators. [Foreman hosts a session for BIPOC participants on February 26.]

Space is limited; please submit a request to participate by March 1 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

Download a printable schedule of Foreman's virtual involvements on campus for Spring 2021.


Biography: P. Gabrielle Foreman is Co-Director of the Center for Black Digital Research/#DigBlk; Professor of English, African American Studies and History; and Paterno Family Chair of Liberal Arts at Pennsylvania State University. She is the founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, which brings to life seven decades of nineteenth-century Black organizing for educational access, labor justice, voting rights and freedom from state-sanctioned violence. Her publications include Activist Sentiments: Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century, the Penguin edition of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig, which first recovered Wilson’s life as an important hair care entrepreneur and spiritualist speaker, and the first edited collection on Black-led state and national activism spanning seven decades and crossing America, The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century.


Additional supporters:

  • African American Studies Department
  • English Department
  • History Department
  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • Office of Special Events
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Women’s and Gender Studies Department
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group--Culture and Democracy in 19th-Century NY
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group--Digital Humanities

This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center; and Patricia Roylance, Associate Professor of English.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Data Feminism Reading Group

Mar 9, 2021, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Virtual

Join researchers from other New York State institutions to read and discuss groundbreaking 2020 work by Catherine D'Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein in Data Feminism.

Meet others nearby who care about data science and data ethics. Attend one or more sessions below to seek critical new understandings of the ways that current data science practice shapes our research and our world.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)

Register here.

Sponsored by the New York Data Carpentry Library Consortium (NYDCLC) and the Central New York Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Scholarship for the Public Good: Expanding Definitions of Academic Success

Mar 11, 2021, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Virtual

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Katina Rogers (CUNY Graduate Center)

Doctoral education opens doors to engaging and often unexpected pathways, with opportunities for significant public impact—an essential element of reinvesting in higher education as a public good. In this talk, Rogers covers how building a university that is truly worth fighting for means thinking more expansively about what constitutes scholarly success—not only to support individual career pathways, but also to work toward greater equity and inclusion in the academy. Rogers will talk about her pathway as well as her work at CUNY, including how the Futures Initiative aims to design new structures for higher education.

Rogers will also draw from her new book, Putting the Humanities PhD to Work: Thriving in and Beyond the Academy, which explores the evolving rhetoric and practices regarding career preparation and how those changes intersect with admissions practices, scholarly reward structures, and academic labor practices—especially the increasing reliance on contingent labor.

Participants are invited to explore these ideas further in a virtual cofee hour the following afternoon. Both activities are hosted by The CNY Humanities Corridor working group, "Humanities Beyond the Academy."

Registration link coming soon. Contact Christopher Flanagan for more information.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Coffee Hour with Katina Rodgers

Mar 12, 2021, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Virtual

a photo related to the event

Katina Rogers (CUNY Graduate Center)

The CNY Humanities Corridor working group, "Humanities Beyond the Academy," hosts a series of mini-residences for publicly-engaged humanistic scholars, bringing together those interested in public humanities and careers outside the academy.  As a follow-up to her public lecture on March 11, Scholarship for the Public Good, Rogers invites casual conversation through this virtual coffee hour, encourging graduate students, recent alumni and interested community partners to discuss her lecture in greater depth and explore the future of the humanities.

Contact Christopher Flanagan to RSVP or learn more. Include any accessibility accommodation requests.

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Deaccessioning After 2020

Mar 18, 2021, 9:00 AM-6:00 PM

Virtual

Thursday, March 18 - 9:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. (EST)
Friday, March 19 - 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (EST)

In the post-2020 landscape, museums are faced with what it means to diversify an art collection, the extent to which they may or should use deaccessioning proceeds to drive that diversification, fund operating expenses, ensure the survival of the museum, or address issues of systemic under-compensation or pay inequity within the ranks of museum staff.

A series of virtual gatherings will comprehensively address these urgent topics in two days of compelling panel discussions and plenary keynote remarks. The symposium’s agenda reflects a broad set of perspectives and taps experts from across the art and museum world, from directors and trustees, seasoned museum professionals, scholars, legal experts, artists, auction houses, and critics. Organized by the Graduate Program in Museum Studies, College of Visual and Performing Arts, and the College of Law at Syracuse University.

View or download a printable schedule of planned sessions.

Please register by March 14, 2021.


Additional supporters:

  • College of Law
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts, Museum Studies
  • College of Visual and Performing Arts, School of Design
  • Syracuse University Humanities Center
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National Endowment for the Humanities: a Virtual Info Session

Mar 19, 2021, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

virtual

An NEH representative will present an overview of funding opportunities. Check back for developing details and registration information.
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Data Feminism Reading Group

Mar 23, 2021, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

Virtual

Join researchers from other New York State institutions to read and discuss groundbreaking 2020 work by Catherine D'Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein in Data Feminism.

Meet others nearby who care about data science and data ethics. Attend one or more sessions below to seek critical new understandings of the ways that current data science practice shapes our research and our world.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 9th, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)
Tuesday, March 23rd, 2021, Noon - 1:00 p.m. (EST)

Register here.

Sponsored by the New York Data Carpentry Library Consortium (NYDCLC) and the Central New York Humanities Corridor.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

On The Future of New Plays

Mar 23, 2021, 6:00 PM-7:00 PM

Virtual Event

Kyle Bass (Syracuse Stage, Colgate University)
Kate Hamill (Playwright/Performer)
Chesney Snow (Artist/Playwright/Educator)
Evan Starling-Davis (Syracuse University)
Robert Hupp (Syracuse Stage)

Aligning with the ideas of "Futures," this panel discussion within the "Cold Read Festival of New Plays" (March 24-28) offers its audience a rare opportunity to witness how creative artists envision a future and develop new work.  How do these writers come up with content? What does it mean to be a part of post-Covid-19 America? How will their work impact the future of playwriting?

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Future of Teaching is... Visual!

Mar 25, 2021, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

Gustafson presents a public lecture on different pathways to foster interdisciplinary discussions of non-verbal and non-narrative communication in art through observation, analysis, historical context, emotional and/or aesthetic appeal.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Book Talk: Music, Dance, and Drama in Early Modern English Schools

Mar 26, 2021, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

virtual

a photo related to the event

Dympna Callaghan (Engish)
Amanda Eubanks Winkler (Art and Music Histories)

Callaghan talks with Eubanks Winkler, author of the recently published book, Music, Dance, and Drama in Early Modern English Schools, the first to systematically analyze the role that the performing arts played in English schools after the Reformation. Eubanks Winkler sheds light and fills historic gaps on the subject through an innovative methodology that combines rigorous archival research with phenomenological and performance studies approaches. Learn more about this work and participate in wide-ranging interdisciplinary discussion. 

Zoom link coming soon. Please email any accessibility accommodation requests by March 18.


Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • English
  • "Practice-Based Research/Pedagogy" and "Performance/History" working groups of the CNY Humanities Corridor
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Using Art for Transformative Teaching (Spring Workshop)

Apr 5, 2021, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Virtual Event

Donna Gustafson (Rutgers University – Zimmerli Art Museum)

As a spring companion to a workshop offered in Fall 2020, Gustafson rejoins Syracuse University Art Museum director Vanja Malloy to lead a workshop exploring innovative ways of using art for teaching across the disciplines.

The Syracuse University Art Museum houses 45,000 artworks that capture moments in history from antiquity to present, providing countless opportunities to discuss everything from the materiality of pigments in ancient art to the Black Lives Movement in contemporary artwork.

RSVP link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Museum Studies
  • Art and Music Histories
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Pushing Boundaries: Art as Activism in a Changing South Asia

Apr 9, 2021, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Virtual Event

Mariam Durrani (Hamilton College)
Tula Goenka (Syracuse University)
Daya Kulkarni (Aarogya Seva)
Shanti (The Aravani Art Project)
Suchitra Vijayan (The Polis Project)

Moderated by Goenka, a panel of scholars, artists, and activists working in South Asia discuss art as a form of resistance against oppression to imagine a more equitable future.

Following a short break, this group of scholars hosts a more interactive virtual workshop for artists interested in forms of creative activism.

Register here for the panel discussion.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Making Change: A Workshop on Activism through Art

Apr 9, 2021, 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

Virtual Event

Mariam Durrani (Hamilton College)
Tula Goenka (Syracuse University)
Daya Kulkarni (Aarogya Seva)
Shanti (The Aravani Art Project)
Suchitra Vijayan (The Polis Project)

During this workshop, invited artist/activists will work with participants on ways to operationalize their activism through art such as photography, documentary film, painting, and the written word.

This workshop acts as an interactive "part 2," following a morning panel discussion by guest scholars.

Register here for the workshop.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

In Succession: Performing Black Vernacular Genealogies

Apr 15, 2021, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

a photo related to the event

Steffani Jemison (Rutgers University)

Hosted by Urban Video Project, multimedia artist Steffani Jemison presents a new collaborative performance exploring black vernacular genealogies that bypass the "old masters," tracing forms of embodied knowledge from the past into the present and future. This event coincides with an exhibition of Jemison's new video work projected by Urban Video Project on the facade of the Everson Museum.

Event link coming soon. For more information, email info@urbanvideoproject.com.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Transmedia
  • Everson Museum of Art
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Why Didn’t We Know?! Seven Decades of 19th-Century Black Political Organizing

Apr 16, 2021, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Virtual

a photo related to the event

Joan Bryant (Syracuse University)
Jim Casey (Pennsylvania State University) 
P. Gabrielle Foreman (Pennsylvania State University)
Derrick R. Spires (Cornell University)
Psyche Williams-Forson (University of Maryland)

Contributors to The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century (UNC Press, 2021) discuss the 70-year Colored Conventions movement, the prequel to the NAACP, Civil Rights, and Black Lives Matter movements. The book represents a pivotal first volume on the Conventions that places Black organizing for legal, educational and labor rights and equal protection at the center of 19th-century race and reform.

Register here by April 14. [CART will be provided.]

Download a printable schedule of Foreman's virtual involvements on campus for Spring 2021.


Biography: P. Gabrielle Foreman is Co-Director of the Center for Black Digital Research/#DigBlk; Professor of English, African American Studies and History; and Paterno Family Chair of Liberal Arts at Pennsylvania State University. She is the founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, which brings to life seven decades of nineteenth-century Black organizing for educational access, labor justice, voting rights and freedom from state-sanctioned violence. Her publications include Activist Sentiments: Reading Black Women in the Nineteenth Century, the Penguin edition of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig, which first recovered Wilson’s life as an important hair care entrepreneur and spiritualist speaker, and the first edited collection on Black-led state and national activism spanning seven decades and crossing America, The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century.


Additional supporters:

  • African American Studies Department
  • English Department
  • History Department
  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion
  • Office of Special Events
  • Syracuse University Libraries
  • Women’s and Gender Studies Department
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group-Culture and Democracy in 19th-Century NY
  • CNY Humanities Corridor Working Group-Digital Humanities

This event is part of the 2021 Watson Professor residency hosted by Dorri Beam, Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English; Joan Bryant, Department Chair and Associate Professor of African American Studies; Petrina Jackson, Director of the Special Collections Research Center; and Patricia Roylance, Associate Professor of English.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Race, Space, and the Environment

Apr 22, 2021, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Virtual Event

Zolani Mahola (Cape Town, South African musician)
Jaleel Campbell (Syracuse artist / illustrator)
Jamie Herring (HabitatSeven-Ottawa, CA) 
Farhana Sultana (Syracuse University, Geography)
Janice Limson (Rhodes University)
Ernest Nkansah-Dwamena (SUNY-ESF Visiting Assistant Professor)
Xolile Madinda (University of Virgina)

This interdisciplinary, interactive multimedia symposium brings together scholars and professionals from Syracuse and South Africa to investigate the intersections of race and the environment, and impacts of climate change on marginalized and racialized populations.

Using a non-traditional, pioneering, sustainable and accessible modality, conference participants engage across distance in dialogue and through large-scale public multimedia installations (online and on site), created by the interdisciplinary cohort of topic experts. 

This live online conversation invites Q&A from the community, with the premise that creative responses to global injustices and threats emerge when people with different worldviews come together to seek sustainable solutions.

Event link coming soon.

This event is part of Syracuse Symposium’s year-long series on “Futures.”

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