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Upcoming Events

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Food and Identity - Out Here: A Documentary Film about Queer Farmers in the U.S.

Mar 28, 2017, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Heroy Auditorium

The Food Studies Program in Falk College hosts this screening and Q&A with filmmaker Jonah Mossberg.


Additional support comes from these SU units:

  • Sociology
  • Women's & Gender Studies
  • Anthropology
  • LGBT Studies & Brain Feeders FST student organization
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

The Welikia Project: Discovering a Natural Sense of Place in New York City

Mar 30, 2017, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

100 Falk

a photo related to the event

In this presentation by Dr. Eric Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society, we'll learn how he and his many collaborators have rediscovered the enormous richness and diversity of nature of the place that, through a long process of social-cultural-and natural transformation, has become New York City.  Sanderson describes his process of discovery and how these findings are being used by teachers, government officials and everyday citizens to transform their experience of place, not just with respect to what was, but with an eye toward what can be.

Additional support for Sanderson's visit comes from the SU Departments of Geography, Religion, Ska-Nonh Great Law of Peace Center, and Sustainability Initatives.

PHOTO CREDIT: Historical view: Markley Boyer / The Mannahatta Project / Wildlife Conservation Society; Modern view: Yann-Arthus Bertrand / CORBIS

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Onondaga Lake: Visualizing the Natural/Historical Continuum

Mar 31, 2017, 9:00 AM-3:30 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

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This workshop explores digital methods and tools to visualize the natural and historical continuum of the indigenous, industrial, and post-industrial history of Onondaga Lake. Participants will come away with ideas for how to use digital technologies to layer together and tell stories about seemingly incompatible features, such as the sacred spaces, post-industrial wastebeds, and lost, secret, effaced or poisoned landscapes that make up Onondaga Lake. Includes a visit to Onondaga Lake and Ska-Nonh Great Law of Peace Center.  Participants may choose to attend all day, just morning or just afternoon sessions.

Please contact Jane Read (443-4279) by March 24 to register for the full or half day workshop; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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The Place of Religion in Film: Son of Saul

Mar 31, 2017, 2:00 PM-6:00 PM

Newhouse

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Ray Smith Symposium

June Hwang (University of Rochester)
Sara Horowitz (York University) 

Presented as part of the Ray Smith Symposium, this two-day “Place of Religion in Film” conference (March 31st - April 1st) this public plenary features York University Professor Sara Horowitz and University of Rochester Professor June Hwang discussing Jewishness, trauma and memory in their lectures on Lázló Nemes’s 2015 film, Son of Saul.

  • 2 - 3:45 p.m., Film Screening, 141 Newhouse 3
  • 4 - 6 p.m., Plenary lectures with Professors Horowitz and Hwang, 141 Newhouse 3
  • 6 - 7 p.m., Reception, Lobby, Newhouse 1

View or download the official event flier.  


Primary sponsors include the Syracuse University Humanities Council, Humanities Center and Religion Department. 

Additional Syracuse University sponsors include the Jewish Studies Program; Office of Research; Graduate School; English Department; Television, Radio & Film Program; Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Department; and Philosophy Department.

Joaquim Pinto’s plenary session is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts’ 2017 Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds Grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Speculation in Latin America

Apr 1, 2017, 9:30 AM-4:30 PM

Demotte Conference Room in the Campus, IC, Cornell University

Speculation in Latin AmericaSpeculative fiction provides complex reflections on the changes that are produced in the subject and society by technological advances.  For information, please contact Debra Castillo.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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The Place of Religion in Film: What Now? Remind Me

Apr 1, 2017, 1:30 PM-5:30 PM

Watson Auditorium

Ray Smith Symposium

Joachim Pinto (Director)

A two-day “Place of Religion in Film” conference (March 31st - April 1st) culminates with Portuguese director Joachim Pinto introducing and facilitating a talkback on his 2013 documentary, What Now? Remind Me, a film that intimately reveals life with HIV, and offers poetic reflections on medicine, human evolution, art, and religion.

•    1:30 - 4:15 p.m., Film screening, Watson Auditorium
•    4:30 - 5:30 p.m., Plenary featuring Joaquim Pinto, director, and Nuno Leonel, cinematographer, Watson Auditorium

View or download the official event flier.


Primary sponsors include the Syracuse University Humanities Council, Humanities Center and Religion Department. 

Additional Syracuse University sponsors include the Jewish Studies Program; Office of Research; Graduate School; English Department; Television, Radio & Film Program; Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Department; and Philosophy Department.

Joaquim Pinto’s plenary session is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts’ 2017 Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds Grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes.

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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Places of Resistance: Simulation and Dissimulation in Modern Italian Provincial Literature

Apr 4, 2017, 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library

Simulation and dissimulation are two rhetorical practices that – despite the more common negative acceptation – hold also positive traits. In "Places of Resistance...," Mauro Novelli (University of Milan, Italy) explores how characters who inhabited the peripheral places of the Italian province during the Fascist years were able to fight the oppressive political regime thanks to dissimulation of their intents.
Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

Meet The Scholar Coffee Hour

Apr 5, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

Tolley Library / Tolley 304

Mauro Novelli (University of Milan, Italy)

This casual gathering provides an opportunity to meet Mauro Novelli, visiting SU for a 3-day series of classroom discussions and a public presentation related to his work focusing on the Fascist years in Italy.

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Problem-Posing as a Way to Assess Writing with Students

Apr 6, 2017, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Kililan Room, 500 Hall of Languages

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Asoa Inoue (University of Washington - Tacoma)

Professor Inoue’s workshop explores issues of race, the importance of responding to student diversity in our classrooms, and the assumptions that undergird our assessment practices.  

Contact kjohnson@syr.edu for information or to request accessibility accommodations.


Additional support comes from Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics and Communications and Rhetorical Studies.

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Doing Antiracist Assessment: Confronting Our Own White Supremacy in the Judgments of Writing

Apr 6, 2017, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM

Kililan Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Asoa Inoue (University of Washington - Tacoma)

Dr. Inoue offers a brief history of the racism and white supremacy inherent in dominant academic discourses and dispositions of teachers toward language. From this history, he explores possibilities for antiracist writing assessment practices in college classrooms. 


Additional support comes from Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, and Communications and Rhetorical Studies.

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THATCamp CNY 2017

Apr 7, 2017, 9:00 AM-4:30 PM

Lower Level, Bird Library

THATCamp CNY 2017 is a day-long "un-conference" open to any interested undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. THATCamp ("The Humanities and Technology Camp") provides a great opportunity for humanists and technologists of all skill levels to learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot. Register online or contact jpwill03@syr.edu for information, or to request accessibility accommodations.
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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Teaching in Real Time: A Participatory Workshop on Teaching in Music and the Humanities, with Eric Usner

Apr 7, 2017, 9:30 AM-12:00 PM

309 Bowne Hall

This collaborative dialogue aims to foster reflection and lead to renewed resolution about what we are as music educators and why we are called to the work we each do. The goals are thoughtful listening, spirited dialogue, and further collaborative and dialogic pedagogical techniques (concrete activities) and strategies (ideas and theories that techniques enact) to transform our classrooms and courses into encounters in real-time.

 “Humanism is not about withdrawal and exclusion. Quite the reverse: its purpose is to make more things available to critical scrutiny as the product of human labor, human energies for emancipation and enlightenment, and, just as importantly, human misreadings and misinterpretations of the collective past and present.” - Edward Said, Humanism and Democratic Criticism, 22.

What is the work you do? What does it mean to teach? Should our teaching be engaged, site-specific—responsive to the lives of our students, resonating with local, national, and global realities? Perhaps, but only if it has curricular relevance? Or do our responsibilities as teachers extend beyond curricular concerns? Do events beyond the “ivory tower” compel a change in how we act in our roles within? What is higher education’s responsibility in the present moment—in how we arrived here and how we progress? Amidst the constant noise of crises of civil society, democratic governance, forced global migration, continuous war, environmental ruptures, is there a moral imperative to examine why and how we do what we do?

If the humanities are expressions of the human condition, we study them to understand what it has meant to be human, to use them as resource and inspiration in our specific individual and collective explorations of universal questions. What does it mean to teach them—to teach perhaps the most profound expression of all—music. How can music respond to our daily lives, while continuing to foster moments of transformation and hope that nurture the individual and communal capacities to live our lives?

This workshop will not be a lecture, but a collaborative dialogue between participants and guest professor Eric Usner that fosters reflection and leads to renewed resolution about what we are and why we are called to the work we each do. The goals are thoughtful listening, spirited dialogue, and further collaborative and dialogic pedagogical techniques (concrete activities) and strategies (ideas and theories that techniques enact) to transform our classrooms and courses into encounters in real-time. This event is organized primarily by and for those who teach in music, but is open to anyone working in the arts and humanities. We will meet over brunch; reservations required.

 To reserve space or request disability accommodations, please contact Professor Sydney Hutchinson.

ERIC USNER
A teacher, writer, and ethnographer of expressive culture, Eric Martin Usner earned a BA from Dickinson College, an MA from University of California-Riverside, his Ph.D. from New York University. He held a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago and has taught at Riverside & NYU as well as at Sarah Lawrence College, the University of Vienna, the University of Chicago, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University, and in Departments of American Studies and Music at Franklin & Marshall College where he is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Music. He has designed surveys of Western Art, World, American, & popular music, and an array of seminars from a cultural-historical and ethnographic approach to music that integrate fields of musicology, ethnomusicology, jazz studies, and American music. He has also developed courses on critical food studies, the US food system, and material culture within an American Studies curriculum.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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School-based Mindfulness Interventions for At-risk Youth

Apr 14, 2017, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

123 Sims Hall

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Dr. Joshua Felver hosts this "brown bag" presentation providing a background in the use of mindfulness-based interventions in public school settings.

Teenagers raised in high-poverty neighborhoods are less likely to succeed in school and are often exposed to maladaptive social behaviors such as community violence and crime. Emerging research suggests that school-based mindfulness practices improve academic and social-emotional outcomes, offering exciting directions for supporting the needs of at-risk youth. This "brown bag" presentation provides a background in the use of mindfulness-based interventions in public school settings and will illustrate these practices by detailing the results from a randomized-control trial of a mindfulness curricula being delivered to Syracuse City School District high school students.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

DH Lunch Talk: How to #Decolonize the Digital Humanities

Apr 14, 2017, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM

Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester

Dorothy Kim (Vassar College)

This talk seeks to make space for broader perspectives in DH and to bring otherwise marginalized voices to the fore.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Comparison as Relation: From World History to World Literature

Apr 18, 2017, 3:30 PM-6:30 PM

214 Hall of Languages

Shu-mei Shi (UCLA)

Contemporary globalization has spurred new conceptualizations of the objects of our research in terms of both scope and scale across the humanities and the social sciences. World literature, as one of the disciplines in the emergence of what can be called global or world studies, is one such example. This lecture will explore how certain world historical approaches would be useful to think along for world literature, and offer relational comparison as a method to better theorize and study world literature.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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2nd Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 18, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

The Humanities Center celebrates SU faculty/staff authors whose humanities-related publications were released in 2016.  Save the date; additional details coming soon.
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An Evening of Poetry with Gabriel Ramirez

Apr 19, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Maxwell Auditorium

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Acclaimed spoken-word poet Gabriel Ramirez comes to Syracuse for a public performance (and a writing workshop) on affirmation as a form of resistance. His work has been featured in Huffington Post, Vibe Magazine, and at a TEDxYouth Conference. Ramirez uses powerful language to tackle controversial subjects such as white privilege and what it means to be Afro-Latino.

Requests for accessibility accommodations should be directed to pwberry@syr.edu by April 6.


Additional support comes from:

  1. Writing Rhetoric Student Organization
  2. Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  3. Creative Writing Program
  4. Harvey Teres, Dean's Professor for the Public Humanities in English
  5. Verbal Blend

 

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I Am Here: Affirmation as a Form of Resistance

Apr 20, 2017, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM

319 Sims Hall

WORKSHOP WITH POET GABRIEL RAMIREZ

Writer, poet, playwright, educator, and activist Gabriel Ramirez conducts a small-group session to follow his evening of poetry (April 19). Ramirez is the 2012 Knicks Poetry Slam Champion and a member of the 2012 Urban Word NYC slam team. Featured in an off-broadway production of “Black Ink” he debuted “Sankofa” a one-man show he wrote and acted in himself, collaborating with award winning choreographer and director, Nicco Annan. Gabriel has performed on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre, United Nations, New York Live Arts, Lincoln Center, Apollo Theatre and other venues & universities around the nation. He has also been featured in the Huffington Post, Vibe Magazine, Blavity, Upworthy and at a TEDxYouth Conference.

Space is limited: please RSVP to pwberry@syr.edu by April 6. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Additional support comes from:

  1. Writing Rhetoric Student Organization
  2. Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  3. Creative Writing Program
  4. Harvey Teres, Dean's Professor for the Public Humanities in English
  5. Verbal Blend
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Part of the Syracuse Symposium series!

YOU ARE HERE: Expanding the Concept of Place [Gallery Reception]

Apr 20, 2017, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Special Collections, 6th floor - Bird Library

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries presents an opening reception for the exhibit, "YOU ARE HERE: Expanding the Concept of Place." 

For most, the term “place” refers to a specific location or a singular state of mind. However, a shift in perspective can redefine “place” to include a vastly wider vocabulary that encompasses displacement, migration, and ways of moving through spaces that connect specifically to the Syracuse community: as in the geographical relevance of the Erie Canal and the imagined destination of the Underground Railroad. The physical manifestation of these historical events and social reform movements are often recorded and defined through handwritten notes, surveyor’s maps, personal photographs and journals. The exhibit “YOU ARE HERE” utilizes rare books, pamphlets, maps, manuscripts, photographs and other artifacts from the permanent collection of the Special Collections Research Center at the Syracuse University Libraries to reframe and expand the notions of what this “place” is, was, and what it can be.


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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Screening Singapore, Booktalk and Workshp

Apr 20, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

374 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University

Sophia Harvey presents from her forthcoming book Screening Singapore: Sensuous Citizenship Formations and the National. The "Aromatic Images” talk engages with articulations of sensuous citizenship formations that emerge from the inter-sensorial dialogue between the distanced senses of sight and sound and the proximal senses of touch, taste, and smell.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Foucault to the Second Power: The Posthumous in the Present

Apr 21, 2017, 8:30 AM-5:00 PM

A.D. White House, Cornell University

This 2-day conference (April 21-22) proposes taking a closer look at the remarkable relevance of Michel Foucault’s posthumous work in relation to contemporary society.

For more information, please contact Timothy Campbell.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Sounding Identities: Media and the Sonic Signification of Difference

Apr 21, 2017, 2:00 PM-5:00 PM

Humanities Center, Conference Room D, University of Rochester

Meina Yates-Richard (Syracuse University)

This mini-seminar will focus on the ways in which sound and media have inflected perceptions of differences, whether of race, ethnicity, class, gender, or sexuality.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Foucault to the Second Power: The Posthumous in the Present

Apr 22, 2017, 8:30 AM-5:00 PM

A.D. White House, Cornell University

This 2-day conference (April 21-22) proposes taking a closer look at the remarkable relevance of Michel Foucault’s posthumous work in relation to contemporary society.

For more information, please contact Timothy Campbell.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Humanities NY Graduate Public Humanities Fellows Presentations

Apr 28, 2017, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

Tolley 304 / Sainsbury Library

Jesse Quinn (Ph.D. candidate, Geography )
Kishauna Soljour (Ph.D. candidate, History)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss the experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects with refugee communities in Syracuse and environmental groups in the Adirondacks.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

Digital Spaces: 2nd Annual Cornell Graduate Student Digital Humanities Symposium

May 5, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 701, Olin Library, Cornell University

This half-day conference features roundtable panels, discussions and workshops, with an optional second-day co-working session (Saturday, May 6) in the new Olin Digital CoLab at Olin Library.

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Funded, at least in part, by the CNY Humanities Corridor[/system-asset]

CNY Ancient Philosophy Spring Workshop

May 6, 2017, 10:30 AM-6:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Jessica Gelber (University of Pittsburgh)
Krisanna Scheiter (Union College)
Ian Hensley (Cornell University)

This semi-annual workshop features presentations and in-depth discussion of current research on a variety of topics in ancient philosophy. Contact cinoble@syr.edu for information or to request accessibility accommodations.

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Local and Global Contexts of World Englishes

Jun 30, 2017, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Syracuse University

Conference June 30 - July 2, 2017

This conference features lectures and workshops on a broad array of topics drawn from a variety of interdisciplinary fields ranging from Information Studies, Computer and Electrical Engineering, Linguistic and Cognitive Sciences to International Business, English, Composition and Rhetoric, Media, Global Affairs and Policy Studies. Link to complete details at the conference website.


Support comes from the Humanities Center in addition to these Syracuse co-sponsors:

Office of the Chancellor
Office of the Vice Chancellor and Provost
College of Arts & Sciences
Office of Research
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications
Newhouse Center for Global Engagement
IAWE
Kiebach Cener for International Business Studies
Moynihan Global Affairs Institute (The Maxwell School)
Center for Advanced Systems and Engineering
Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
Asian American Studies
Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
Latino/Latin American Studies Programs
Communication and Rhetorical Studies
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Department of Psychology
SU Abroad and the Associate Provost for International Education
South Asia Center
Linguistic Studies Program