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Recent coverage of the Syracuse Humanities Center...

‘Books in the Humanities’ Celebrates University Writers

April 28, 2021

Article by Ellen de Graffenreid

More than 40 Syracuse University authors and editors—some with multiple works—are being showcased in the sixth annual Books in the Humanities celebration, hosted by the Syracuse University Humanities Center, in collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Research and the Syracuse University Libraries...

Read the full article at SU News.

Curating the Bigger Picture: Evan Starling-Davis Approaches Literacy from Multiple Entry Points

Starling-Davis is a Humanities New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellow (2020-21)

Starling-Davis is a Humanities New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellow (2020-21)

April 5, 2021
By Ellen de Graffenried

Evan Starling-Davis is a narrative artist, curator and producer. More precisely, he names himself a digital-age “griot”—a term used for traveling poets, musicians and storytellers who maintain a tradition of oral history derived from the African diaspora’s culture and history...

Read the full story at SU News.

Bringing an Earlier Era of Activism to Digital Life

P. Gabrielle Foreman, founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, is the 2021 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor of the Humanities. (Submitted photo)

P. Gabrielle Foreman, founding faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project, is the 2021 Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor of the Humanities. (Submitted photo)

January 28, 2021

Article by Dan Bernardi

Bringing seven decades of nineteenth-century Black organizing to digital life is the mission of the Colored Conventions Project (CCP). Co-founded by faculty director P. Gabrielle Foreman, the CCP is a scholarly and community research project focused on digitally preserving Black political activism from the 1830s to 1890s, some of which occurred in this region, near Syracuse University and across Central New York...

Read the full article at A&S News.

Skepticism of Masks, Vaccinations Isn’t New: Ph.D. Candidate’s Research on 19th-Century Britain Provides Lessons for Today

AY20 Humanities Center Dissertation Fellow, Haejoo Kim

AY20 Humanities Center Dissertation Fellow, Haejoo Kim

December 8, 2020

Article by Brandon Dyer

Haejoo Kim, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English, is currently researching and writing her dissertation “Medical Liberty and Alternative Health Practices in Nineteenth-Century Britain.” She is exploring 19th-century British anti-vaccination periodicals and pamphlets to examine the rhetoric. “When the pandemic first hit in early spring, I was thinking I should have been working on epidemics and contagious diseases instead of alternative health practices,” Haejoo says. “And then people started to protest against mask wearing, and vaccine refusal resurfaced with full force..."

Read the full story at SU News.

A Vital Space: CNY Humanities Corridor Offers Unique Resource to Writers

December 9, 2020

Article by Dan Bernardi

Collaboration can be a key element in the process of taking a book from rough draft to print. It often takes many sets of eyes to provide the necessary clarity writers might not see on their own. To gain such valuable feedback, it helps to find a trusted group of peers who have knowledge of a book’s subject matter and who are committed to a collaborative, give-and-take research ethos. Thanks to support from the Central New York Humanities Corridor, scholars are connecting with colleagues from across the region who specialize in corresponding areas of study...

Read the full article at A&S News.

Bringing Personal Stories to Life

Rayan Mohamed (left) and Felone “Abigail” Nganga work on an assignment with their video cameras. Photo courtesy of Brice Nordquist.

Rayan Mohamed (left) and Felone “Abigail” Nganga work on an assignment with their video cameras. Photo courtesy of Brice Nordquist.

November 12, 2020

Article by Jay Cox

Through the Narratio Fellowship, refugee students immerse themselves in filmmaking that reflects their unique perspectives. Felone “Abigail” Nganga arrived in the U.S. with her sister in November 2019 following a harrowing journey that began several years earlier at their home in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their father was assassinated by government forces, and they lost touch with their mother after she fled...

Read the full story at SU News.

Sarah Workman’s Role Helps Humanities Professors Across Campus

Sarah Workman, Assistant Director for Proposal Development

Sarah Workman, Assistant Director for Proposal Development

October 8, 2020

Article by Brandon Dyer

As assistant director for proposal development, Sarah Workman applies her academic background to help Syracuse University humanities faculty develop research proposals and find funding and support to make their ideas a reality. “I’m constantly looking at what’s out there in terms of funding, especially as it pertains to the humanities faculty..."

Read the full article at SU News.

Glimmers of Possibility for a More Just World

September 29, 2020

Article by Dan Bernardi

As we collectively navigate through a global pandemic, pursue social justice on multiple fronts, and seek answers to the global warming crisis, “Futures,” the theme of this year’s Syracuse Symposium hosted by the Syracuse University Humanities Center (SUHC), offers a series of events to broaden people’s perspectives, inspire change and encourage ethically based action...

Read the full article at A&S News.

Two Virtual Syracuse Symposium Events Focused on Disability and Future

Hilary Weaver (University at Buffalo)

Hilary Weaver (University at Buffalo)

September 29, 2020

Article by Robert Conrad

The Burton Blatt Institute (BBI), housed within the College of Law, and the Syracuse University Humanities Center, whose home is the College of Arts and Sciences, are hosting two virtual events on disability and future thinking...

Read the full article at SU News.

Human Rights Film Festival moves online to adapt to COVID-19

"Coded Bias” by Shalini Kantayya is about the biases that exist in our everyday technology.

"Coded Bias” by Shalini Kantayya is about the biases that exist in our everyday technology.

September 24, 2020

Article by Linh Le

The documentaries featured in this year’s Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival, which centers around the theme of “Futures,” include “Coded Bias” by Shalini Kantayya, “Landfall” by Cecilia Aldarondo and “Yeh Freedom Life” by Priya Sen. The films will cover both international and national civil rights, along with social justice issues...

Read the full article at the Daily Orange.

 

Career Mentoring for Humanities Grads

September 15, 2020

The Graduate School and the Humanities Center are pleased to announce the launch of the Humanities Graduate Mentoring Program. There are many rewarding career paths that humanities graduates can follow...

Read the full article in the Graduate Student Newsletter.

18th Annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival Is Online for 2020

September 4, 2020

The 18th annual Syracuse University Human Rights Film Festival (SUHRFF) is online from Sept. 24-26 due to COVID-19 restrictions. The film festival is part of Syracuse Symposium 2020-21: FUTURES and is presented by the Syracuse University Humanities Center in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Newhouse School of Public Communications...

Read the full article at SU News.

Point of Contact Gallery Announces Opening of ‘Rewriting History’ by Fabiola Jean-Louis

photo credit: Hedspeth Art Consulting

photo credit: Hedspeth Art Consulting

August 20, 2020

See works by Haitian-born artist Fabiola Jean-Louis, Sept. 7 through Nov. 20, at Point of Contact Gallery. Admission is free and open to the public, with guided tours available virtually or on site, by appointment. Point of Contact will also host a virtual artist talk and discussion panel for “Rewriting History,” on Nov. 12 at 6:30 p.m...

Read the full article at SU News.

University Lectures 20th Season Features ‘1619 Project’ Creator Nikole Hannah-Jones

photo credit: James Estrin (NYT)

photo credit: James Estrin (NYT)

August 19, 2020

Article by Kevin Morrow

The University Lectures series celebrates its 20th season this fall with a stellar line-up, to include Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of The New York Times’ acclaimed “The 1619 Project,” on Oct. 8...

Read the full article at SU News